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kodancer
10-22-2008, 11:15 AM
How would you lower a key? Ex: 3 half steps down from F C Em chords without playing lowest note on a higher octave.

Is the only of doing this is to lower the tuning to 3 half steps down?

mhh
10-22-2008, 11:25 AM
You can just play D#, A, and Dm chords instead.

uluapoundr
10-22-2008, 12:10 PM
Wouldn't it be D, A, and C#m?

seeso
10-22-2008, 12:43 PM
Wouldn't it be D, A, and C#m?

Yes it would.

To lower the key by 3 half steps, simply take every chord down 3 half steps.

If it helps you to look at your uke while doing so, go ahead. The first chord you want to lower is an F. Find the F note anywhere on your uke. An easy one is the 5th fret on the C string.

Count down 3 frets, and you're at the 2nd fret on the C string. What's that note? It's a D. So to lower the F chord 3 half steps, you must play a D chord.

Do the same for the other chords.

You can find a C at the 5th fret on the G string. Count down 3 frets and you're at A.

Etc.

freedive135
10-22-2008, 06:27 PM
Please excuse my not having a clue as to what you are talking about but......
What are you talking about????
And why would I want to do this "Lowering a Key"
Also what is a "half step"?

seeso
10-22-2008, 06:34 PM
Please excuse my not having a clue as to what you are talking about but......
What are you talking about????
And why would I want to do this "Lowering a Key"
Also what is a "half step"?

The two main reasons for lowering a key are one, to make it easier to sing, and two, to make it easier to play.

A half step is a semitone. G to G# is a half step up. Every fret on your uke represents a half step.

freedive135
10-23-2008, 06:43 AM
Thank you Seeso

SamWise
10-23-2008, 07:06 AM
The "key" refers to which scale the notes come from. In this example, the chords were originally in the key of C, which means that the notes of the melody would all be found on the white notes of a piano. After lowering, (or "transposing") it's now in A, and some of the notes (I can't remember how many!) will be on the black notes. The tune will start lower, and therefore it'll be easier to sing.

NukeDOC
10-23-2008, 07:35 AM
A - A#/Bb - B - C - C#/Db - D - D#/Eb - E - F - F#/Gb - G - G#/Ab - A
fret 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12



this is how i picture it in my head. those 12 notes are basically your twelve initial frets on a stringed instrument (like on guitar). so in this case, you have an A string so when you get to the 12th fret you are back to an A again.

but you can use this for transposing any chord without having to learn what key you are playing in. its more work, but will help you understand how to transpose.

so you started with F, C, and Em.

take your F. its number 8 on the line there. you want to transpose everything down 3 half steps. 8-3=5. so now all the F's in your song you are going to change to D's. if you have to, print it out, cross out all the F's and write in D's in place.

now C. its #3. 3-3=0. the 0 position, of course is A. so now all your C chords will be A chords.

now here is where it might get confusing. you have an Em. dont worry about the minor just yet. just take the E for now. #7. 7-3=4. now we have C#. now time to remember the minor. so all your Em's are now going to be played C#m.

if this is a chord pattern that takes up your whole song, then youre done. just remember instead of F, C, Em... now you are playing it D, A, C#m