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View Full Version : "All Around The World (Grits Aint Groceries)"



Hippie Dribble
06-07-2012, 04:16 PM
my hopeless fanboy version of the doc's mindblowing take on this Titus Turner song, offered up in utter self deprecation

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4SgwXzJm1Es

check this out if you really want to hear the blues played like it should be: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHHtfM3HtyY John, you're totally right mate, all else is pointless... :o

Camsuke
06-07-2012, 05:13 PM
Oh yeah! I'm lovin' that baritone sound mate, great work.

mm stan
06-07-2012, 09:22 PM
Aloha Eugene....thought it was Elvis...hee hee sounded great..and love your style with that sweet baritone...keep um coming...

vanflynn
06-08-2012, 03:11 AM
Thanks as always Jon, it looks like that Mainland sure likes its new home. It sings pretty for you.

BTW, you forgot your hat!

23skidoo
06-08-2012, 03:15 AM
Not sure if I like your's or Doc's better - such a great tune, and two great takes on it (and don't be all humble and modest about it either - you killed it). I like this thing, you guys doing the same tunes - it's almost as educational as it is entertaining.... and keep rockin that Mainland baritone - sounds great.....

ukuleledaveey
06-08-2012, 04:24 AM
Amazing as ever Jon, you really are such a great player and singer, and lovely chap :) loved the look of the vid , nice in black and white, and i like the hatless look. Really enjoyed it. Apart from the Uke being a accessible instrument to those of us with limited talent (meaning me lol) it has also opened up a whole new world of music, well i know it has in my case. I Hardly listen to anything new now, and i always considered myself to having my finger on the pulse of music.
But i really dont have much time now for the modern stuff, there is much to look up and discover from the days of past and there is some great musical archaeologists that point us in the right direction on this amazing community of ours. So thanks to you all, have a great weekend Jon and family, kindest regards from me :)

Hippie Dribble
06-08-2012, 01:47 PM
thanks guys for what you said. I'm embarrassed to even reply to this thread but oh well, I will, to say this...

I listen to a lot of music, it pretty much is my life. My musical heroes are Pete Seeger and Cliff Edwards, but I have to say that the doc and his music have inspired me at least as much as those two men. Hearing his take on these old tunes has widened my appreciation of music generally and enriched the landscape of my world in the past year, perhaps even more than those two. He has opened my eyes to the blues and jazz and the potential of the ukulele in amazing ways and I am so grateful for that. I am always hanging out for his next song as I know it will be something special and inspirational. His voice, his delivery are just amazing. I have a couple of his piano albums and they receive easily as much playing time as anything else in my collection.

Every now and then I can't help myself and have to have a go at one of his songs. This was one such time. Personally, John Bianchi is totally right...hearing the doc do this old blues stuff on the uke makes everyone elses attempts seem futile. But oh well, sometimes you just gotta do it anyway. For me it's about learning new ways of playing and improving as a singer and player. I think my take on this tune is very average but I keep striving because I want to be better at music and without the doc I would more than likely still be playing folk songs almost exclusively. I simply take a bow to the doc and thank him for doing what he does. His music has changed my life so much for the better.

:cheers:

drbekken
06-08-2012, 02:25 PM
thanks guys for what you said. I'm embarrassed to even reply to this thread but oh well, I will, to say this...

I listen to a lot of music, it pretty much is my life. My musical heroes are Pete Seeger and Cliff Edwards, but I have to say that the doc and his music have inspired me at least as much as those two men. Hearing his take on these old tunes has widened my appreciation of music generally and enriched the landscape of my world in the past year, perhaps even more than those two. He has opened my eyes to the blues and jazz and the potential of the ukulele in amazing ways and I am so grateful for that. I am always hanging out for his next song as I know it will be something special and inspirational. His voice, his delivery are just amazing. I have a couple of his piano albums and they receive easily as much playing time as anything else in my collection.

Every now and then I can't help myself and have to have a go at one of his songs. This was one such time. Personally, John Bianchi is totally right...hearing the doc do this old blues stuff on the uke makes everyone elses attempts seem futile. But oh well, sometimes you just gotta do it anyway. For me it's about learning new ways of playing and improving as a singer and player. I think my take on this tune is very average but I keep striving because I want to be better at music and without the doc I would more than likely still be playing folk songs almost exclusively. I simply take a bow to the doc and thank him for doing what he does. His music has changed my life so much for the better.

:cheers:

I can only say thanks for such praise. I'm glad someone enjoys my versions of these old songs. If I can be an inspiration that's just so nice. Honestly, I never thought I should hear something like that. I play old blues and jazz because I quite simply LOVE the music. It spoke to me when I was a kid, and has never stopped. Up here, and down on the continent, I've had the immense privilege of playing piano for visiting New Orleans artists. They have taught me so much about time, rhythm and delivery. I would not pretend that I am in their league; I am a guest in their world. My mother tongue is spoken by only about five million people worldwide, and the culture I come from is very different from New Orleans in a multitude of ways. However, what frozen Norwegians have in common with New Orleanians is a stubborn will to survive under near-impossible living conditions, and a knack for all-night partying that is second to none. We also have a folk music tradition with plenty of 'blue notes' and strange beats, which at times somehow corresponds to New Orleans music and blues. When Louis Armstrong heard the Hardanger fiddle on his first visit here in the 30s, he is reported to have said that it was just like blues. Jazz fiddler Stuff Smith said the same. I play the music I play, and I am sometimes very surprised by the positive feedback here on UU. As a uke player, I am learning all the time, and I am blown away by many of the videos here. Once again thanks for all the nice comments. I cherish them.

Hippie Dribble
06-08-2012, 02:38 PM
I can only say thanks for such praise. I'm glad someone enjoys my versions of these old songs. If I can be an inspiration that's just so nice. Honestly, I never thought I should hear something like that. I play old blues and jazz because I quite simply LOVE the music. It spoke to me when I was a kid, and has never stopped. Up here, and down on the continent, I've had the immense privilege of playing piano for visiting New Orleans artists. They have taught me so much about time, rhythm and delivery. I would not pretend that I am in their league; I am a guest in their world. My mother tongue is spoken by only about five million people worldwide, and the culture I come from is very different from New Orleans in a multitude of ways. However, what frozen Norwegians have in common with New Orleanians is a stubborn will to survive under near-impossible living conditions, and a knack for all-night partying that is second to none. We also have a folk music tradition with plenty of 'blue notes' and strange beats, which at times somehow corresponds to New Orleans music and blues. When Louis Armstrong heard the Hardanger fiddle on his first visit here in the 30s, he is reported to have said that it was just like blues. Jazz fiddler Stuff Smith said the same. I play the music I play, and I am sometimes very surprised by the positive feedback here on UU. As a uke player, I am learning all the time, and I am blown away by many of the videos here. Once again thanks for all the nice comments. I cherish them.
thanks for the insight doc. Interesting to read this, and of the connection between two cultures that on the surface at least, appear so different. Guess it reinforces the truism that music is really the universal language and a bridge between all peoples. Thing is, when it is played from the heart, with soul, and with every fibre of your being, who cares where you come from...it is bound to move people in some way because we instinctively pick up on someone who plays in an authentic way with real passion, as easily as we see through what is phony. The stuff that endures is what is real. That is how I have viewed everything you've done so far on your journey mate, it speaks to me with a voice of utter authenticity and your love for what you do is obvious. Thanks brother and keep on doin it.