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bombbuddy
07-15-2012, 10:54 AM
I have gone through all of the UU+ music theory classes and still want to learn more!! :D so are there any good books on music theory that you all would suggest? Thanks for your help! :cool:

Plainsong
07-15-2012, 02:22 PM
I think if you're thirsty for more, a college level music theory class you could audit, taught by a great professor, would really bring it all together. Maybe there's some open university or summer courses open to the public that might be available. It's worth checking out, since theory books are so dry, a good teacher can bring it together and make it enjoyable.

OldePhart
07-15-2012, 03:37 PM
I have gone through all of the UU+ music theory classes and still want to learn more!! :D so are there any good books on music theory that you all would suggest? Thanks for your help! :cool:

One of the best books I've ever read for the intermediate player who has learned basic tritone (chord) theory is "scales over chords" (I don't recall the author but I remember the cover of the book, a beautiful red translucent flame Strat on a white cover). It's primarily a guitar book but since it's mostly theory the information presented applies to anything even if the specific examples are guitar-centric. I wish I could find it (I have the feeling I lent it and never got it back) because I think I would get even more from it now than I did when I used it years ago.

John

katysax
07-15-2012, 03:42 PM
The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine: http://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Theory-Book-Mark-Levine/dp/1883217040/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1342399104&sr=8-1&keywords=music+theory+jazz is excellent. It helps if you have access to a keyboard as you go through it - you can use just about any keyboard. It's not geared to ukulele or any particular instrument - I used it to try to become a better saxophone player. It's not boring or dry. Even if you are not into jazz don't be put off by the title. Theory is theory. Jazz theory is applicable to all popular music.

mangorockfish
07-15-2012, 03:48 PM
Have you looked at Music Theory For Dummies? It's pretty good. I've been reading on it for awhile.

Arr4fun
07-15-2012, 03:56 PM
The Complete Idiots Guide to Music Theory is also good.

nix
07-15-2012, 06:39 PM
I have to second what Plainsong said. If you can find a college course nearby it is well worth it. I took music theory 100 at a local community college and it really opened things up for me. The ear training and learning how to "hear" a time signature helped me a lot. I also had a teacher who didn't laugh at questions like "what's the point of cut time?!?". The textbook was a whopping $100 but it is a good one and I still refer back to it sometimes.

Disclaimer: I'm a librarian at a community college. My college is too small to have music theory so I took it at a different community college but I wanted to let you know my bias.

Nix

bombbuddy
07-16-2012, 03:11 AM
Have you looked at Music Theory For Dummies? It's pretty good. I've been reading on it for awhile.
The music theory for dummies book was the first thing i thought of when I started looking for a music theory book. But before I got it I wanted to ask to see if there was anything bettor or more recommended then that book.


I have to second what Plainsong said. If you can find a college course nearby it is well worth it. I took music theory 100 at a local community college and it really opened things up for me. The ear training and learning how to "hear" a time signature helped me a lot. I also had a teacher who didn't laugh at questions like "what's the point of cut time?!?". The textbook was a whopping $100 but it is a good one and I still refer back to it sometimes.

Disclaimer: I'm a librarian at a community college. My college is too small to have music theory so I took it at a different community college but I wanted to let you know my bias.

Nix

I will defiantly go and look around and see if the community college by me has a music theory class.

and thank you all so much for the help! :D

BlueInGreenUkulele
07-16-2012, 03:18 AM
The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine. It covers just about every topic of jazz music theory. You can download through Amazon.

missameeames
07-16-2012, 03:24 AM
The Complete Idiots Guide to Music Theory is also good.

SIL teaches music theory at the college, and she recommended the Idiots book to me. She liked it better than the dummies book.

csibona
07-16-2012, 07:18 AM
I own both Music Theory For Dummies and Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine. I've only made it through the Music Theory for Dummies book thus far - but I do recommend it.

carolani
07-16-2012, 07:50 AM
One of the best books I've ever read for the intermediate player who has learned basic tritone (chord) theory is "scales over chords" (I don't recall the author but I remember the cover of the book, a beautiful red translucent flame Strat on a white cover). It's primarily a guitar book but since it's mostly theory the information presented applies to anything even if the specific examples are guitar-centric. I wish I could find it (I have the feeling I lent it and never got it back) because I think I would get even more from it now than I did when I used it years ago.

John

Found it on Amazon. It's by Wilbur Savidge.

Plainsong
07-17-2012, 02:24 AM
I was thinking about taking an open university theory refresher course myself, but of course, they're not offering it this year! They also had this nifty music and cultures course at the same place. Do you think it's offered this year? Of course not, frakking Sibelius Academy.

If I remember correctly (and I may not), the book we used back in the day was Harmony and Voice Leading.

JamieFromOntario
07-17-2012, 02:34 AM
Was Harmony and Voice Leading the one by Aldwell and Schacter?

joeybug
07-17-2012, 11:49 PM
I echo Plainsong's advice about a course. But I also recommend Music Theory For Dummies, Ukulele For Dummies (it covers some music theory linked to the Ukulele) and Ukulele Fretboard Roadmaps, all three of which I have worked through (as well as the UU+ course) and found most helpful!

There is also a group here in the group section for working through Fretboard Roadmaps.

Hope that helps!

Plainsong
07-19-2012, 07:49 PM
Was Harmony and Voice Leading the one by Aldwell and Schacter?

It's been a very very long time, but I think it was. Not the most interesting of reads, but Dr. Hughes was awesome.

bazmaz
07-20-2012, 05:38 AM
We need a thread for non theory books......;)

(I'll get my coat.....)

Shastastan
07-20-2012, 11:05 AM
The Complete Idiots Guide to Music Theory is also good.


Bump! Mega Dittos!

pulelehua
07-21-2012, 03:33 AM
Sounds like someone needs to write a ukulele-specific theory primer................................

Doc_J
07-21-2012, 03:16 PM
I was thinking about taking an open university theory refresher course myself, but of course, they're not offering it this year! They also had this nifty music and cultures course at the same place. Do you think it's offered this year? Of course not, frakking Sibelius Academy.

If I remember correctly (and I may not), the book we used back in the day was Harmony and Voice Leading.

MIT has Music Theory in their OpenCourseware... and it is free!
http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/#music-and-theater-arts

Gwynedd
07-22-2012, 01:28 AM
Agree with the other posts here about taking a course; music theory is something that is more interesting when taught in a class (I learned mine from my piano teacher.) But for books, two suggestions, one is Barry Maz's new Uke book, (http://amzn.to/MvyxAQ) which is a combo of Book One and Two and includes some theory. You get uke info too, stuff that is particular to ukes that everyone needs to know. And The Complete Idiot (http://amzn.to/LGhNXW), which I prefer to the Dummies, though that is fine too.

pulelehua
07-22-2012, 10:30 PM
I suppose the reasons I was thinking of an instrument-specific book are:

1. I teach music theory, so have a pretty good grounding in it myself.
2. I haven't actually sat and applied everything I know about theory to the ukulele, and so sometimes get caught out. I was playing with a friend who was leaving my school last week, and he said, "Blues in C", which was fine. But then he said, "Solo!" And I realised I had never soloed in C blues on a ukulele before. It was fine, but I did feel much more hemmed in than usual. Blues in C around the 10th fret, and suddenly I was having to think and listen, rather than just intuitively know. Which was very good for me, but it did point out a gap in my applied understanding.
3. Some people are put off by MUSIC THEORY, and need some sort of welcoming gesture/helping hand. Saying, "This is theory for your instrument" might be the bridge some people need. It would also make it easier for them to apply what they were learning.

I totally agree that theory is universal, and that it's best understood as a universal. But I think some people need to get stuck into something specific before they can step back and see the elegant symmetry of it all.

Plainsong
07-23-2012, 02:37 AM
MIT has Music Theory in their OpenCourseware... and it is free!
http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/#music-and-theater-arts

That's a good link for anyone needing an online course. I was sort of preferring an actual interactive class, and since I have taken theory a million years ago I'm not in a huge need... But I bet someone around here is!

luluwrites
07-23-2012, 03:50 AM
I'm too big a dope to figure out how to use that Open Courseware. Are there class notes? Or just a syllabus and recommended texts?

Doc_J
07-23-2012, 05:40 AM
I'm too big a dope to figure out how to use that Open Courseware. Are there class notes? Or just a syllabus and recommended texts?

It has notes, assignments, exams, syllabus, readings, listenings, etc.

Here is a shorter link to the Intro to Music Composition.
http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/music-and-theater-arts/21m-065-introduction-to-musical-composition-fall-2005/

BJ1s
08-03-2012, 12:31 PM
Complete Idiots Guide To Music Theory is very good book.