PDA

View Full Version : The electric ukulele: a new instrument



Skrik
07-30-2012, 01:00 AM
A ukulele is an acoustic chordophone of certain dimensions that has four (courses of) gut (or equivalent) strings. Sticking an acoustic pickup in a ukulele doesn't essentially change things. Giving it a solid body to control feedback is a greater change, but the instrument still sounds and feels like a ukulele.

Slap some steel strings on the thing, however, so that you can use an induction pickup in the manner of an electric guitar, and you have changed the nature of the instrument. The sound changes, the way it plays changes, and the way it looks changes.

What it has changed into, I'm not sure -- I consider it closer to a mandolin than a ukulele.

I've been thinking about this for a while, and I understand that I am being somewhat controversial, given that there are other instruments in the ukulele family with steel strings (the tiple, for example). I don't mind the advent of a new instrument, but I have difficulty thinking of the steel-stringed electric ukulele as a ukulele.

Anyone else want to throw in their $0.02?

dkcrown
07-30-2012, 01:39 AM
Well said Shrik. I couldn't agree more. But then again, what do I know? If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it's a duck. But if it doesn't, then is it really a duck?

I'm sure that kissing will respectfully disagree. But there are many different types of guitars,(acoustic, electric, classical to name a few), but they are all still called guitars.

SweetWaterBlue
07-30-2012, 01:39 AM
My solid body Eleuke tenor is a different instrument than my acoustic tenor, but also the same. It has a lot cleaner sound, but less complex overtones, than my acoustic. It also has less sustain. I don't have a steel string electric uke, but I think the additional sustain would be nice. As to whether the electrics are different instruments entirely, I suppose you could say that, but they still play like ukuleles (fingerings etc), which is nice.

WhenDogsSing
07-30-2012, 01:57 AM
A ukulele is an acoustic chordophone of certain dimensions that has four (courses of) gut (or equivalent) strings. Sticking an acoustic pickup in a ukulele doesn't essentially change things. Giving it a solid body to control feedback is a greater change, but the instrument still sounds and feels like a ukulele.

Slap some steel strings on the thing, however, so that you can use an induction pickup in the manner of an electric guitar, and you have changed the nature of the instrument. The sound changes, the way it plays changes, and the way it looks changes.

What it has changed into, I'm not sure -- I consider it closer to a mandolin than a ukulele.

I've been thinking about this for a while, and I understand that I am being somewhat controversial, given that there are other instruments in the ukulele family with steel strings (the tiple, for example). I don't mind the advent of a new instrument, but I have difficulty thinking of the steel-stringed electric ukulele as a ukulele.

Anyone else want to throw in their $0.02?

I agree completely. I have trouble referring to a steel string solid body electric instrument as a ukulele.

Nuprin
07-30-2012, 02:13 AM
A ukulele is an acoustic chordophone of certain dimensions that has four (courses of) gut (or equivalent) strings. Sticking an acoustic pickup in a ukulele doesn't essentially change things. Giving it a solid body to control feedback is a greater change, but the instrument still sounds and feels like a ukulele.

Slap some steel strings on the thing, however, so that you can use an induction pickup in the manner of an electric guitar, and you have changed the nature of the instrument. The sound changes, the way it plays changes, and the way it looks changes.

What it has changed into, I'm not sure -- I consider it closer to a mandolin than a ukulele.

I've been thinking about this for a while, and I understand that I am being somewhat controversial, given that there are other instruments in the ukulele family with steel strings (the tiple, for example). I don't mind the advent of a new instrument, but I have difficulty thinking of the steel-stringed electric ukulele as a ukulele.

Anyone else want to throw in their $0.02?

Hmmm...interesting point. I have a steel-string solid body and I do consider it a ukulele due to the tuning (re-entrant GCEA), the number of strings, the scale, and the width of the fingerboard.

For instance, I used to own an Epiphone Mandobird. It had 4 strings and I tuned it re-entrant GCEA (although I later changed it to low G). The problem was the fret spacing was very different and the fingerboard width was much, much smaller. Therefore it didn't play like a ukulele, so I didn't consider it one.

The one I have now doesn't sound anything like an ukulele, but it plays like one (just one with steel strings). So, as I consider it a uke, I guess the playability of the instrument is more of an identifying factor to me than the sound. That probably shouldn't be the case, but as Dana (dkcrown) mentioned, there are different types of guitars (acoustic, electric, classical, etc.) but they are all still considered guitars. Guess I feel the same about ukes.

The Big Kahuna
07-30-2012, 02:52 AM
An instrument is defined by scale length, tuning, number of strings and the way it's played.

Take a 4 string Ukulele, change the body from hollow to solid, change the string material from nylon to steel and fit a pickup and you have an electric 4 string Ukulele.

kissing
07-30-2012, 03:53 AM
Here we go again.
A steel string electric ukulele is an ukulele.

It is not a Mandolin.
Mandolins have steel strings, and can have 4 or 8 strings.
But if you actually hold one in your hands, it is completely different to any ukulele.
The neck is a lot thinner, and traditionally they are tuned in 5ths, not 4ths. It is also played completely differently, typically with a plectrum.

It is not an electric guitar.
Electric guitars generally have 6 strings, and the strings are closer together, and the scale length and dimensions are completely different.
To call an electric uke an electric guitar is the same as calling an acoustic ukulele a classical guitar.

As stated by the Big Kahuna just above, an electric ukulele has the same scale length, tuning, number of strings and playability as an ukulele.
They are made by ukulele manufacturers with the intention of being an ukulele, to be played by ukulele players after an electric sound.

Just like how many non-Hawaiian makers of ukulele make acoustic, short-scale, 4-stringed instruments and market them as "ukuleles" for ukulele players.

Wicked
07-30-2012, 07:29 PM
"A steel string electric ukulele is an ukulele."

Amen!

We have beaten this dead horse many times. The ukulele is a "folk instrument", there is no one way to build or play them. Let the violinists debate ludicrous parameters, and leave my chunk of wood with four strings alone.

Paul December
07-30-2012, 07:34 PM
You make a D chord 2220 on one...
...it's a ukulele!

G Hill
07-31-2012, 12:20 AM
An instrument is defined by scale length, tuning, number of strings and the way it's played.

Take a 4 string Ukulele, change the body from hollow to solid, change the string material from nylon to steel and fit a pickup and you have an electric 4 string Ukulele.

I agree 100%
I like the idea of an electric solid body steel string ukulele. I don't play guitar but I like the sound of electric guitar.
I play ukulele, and having an option like this gives me the opportunity to play rock/blues songs in an electric guitar style.
I'm toying with the idea of having a baritone scale electric uke made specifically for this purpose :)
Just my two bobs worth.....
Cheers
Gary

The Big Kahuna
07-31-2012, 12:37 AM
I'm toying with the idea of having a baritone scale electric uke made specifically for this purpose :)


http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?67951-FS-Jupiter-Creek-Baritone-Telecaster-Ukulele

G Hill
07-31-2012, 12:44 AM
Thanks for the link BK
I've had a look at this and its very nice. Problem I have is that i'm a Lefty.
I really fancy something in the style of a Gibson 335, so I reckon i'm going to have to
go down the luthier route.
Cheers
Gary

savagehenry
07-31-2012, 01:09 AM
Thanks for the link BK
I've had a look at this and its very nice. Problem I have is that i'm a Lefty.
I really fancy something in the style of a Gibson 335, so I reckon i'm going to have to
go down the luthier route.
Cheers
Gary

Check with Kamoa, maybe they make a lefty Evolve, if not you could always change the nut. It has a nice 335 shape. Probably could even put a little pickguard on it.

kissing
07-31-2012, 01:49 AM
Thanks for the link BK
I've had a look at this and its very nice. Problem I have is that i'm a Lefty.
I really fancy something in the style of a Gibson 335, so I reckon i'm going to have to
go down the luthier route.
Cheers
Gary

For what it's worth, the Eastwood tenor electric guitar is very similar to a baritone uke, and also has a lefty version.
I have one (right handed version), and love it to death.

Have it tuned DGBE, plays like a dream.


However, it's more like a telecaster than a Gibson.


The thing to note that the string spacing is a bit wider than the typical uke, sorta like classical guitar spacing (which is different from most tenor guitars).
And the scale length is a bit longer. Other than that, it feels "right" in the hands of a uker (more roomy fretboard). Great for fingerpicking


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viwZeezJOsU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viwZeezJOsU

kissing
07-31-2012, 01:56 AM
If you do go down the luthier route, I think Mann would be a great option:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DeoD4DXcNDw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DeoD4DXcNDw

http://www.manndolins.com/new_page_10.htm

cheekmeat
07-31-2012, 06:52 AM
You make a D chord 2220 on one...
...it's a ukulele!

Aww crap. I make a D chord 0003!

What have I been playing?

Mandarb
07-31-2012, 06:58 AM
Aww crap. I make a D chord 0003!

What have I been playing?

....C chord....

cheekmeat
07-31-2012, 07:13 AM
....C chord....

No, it's a D on mine...But I'm a little old-fashioned. ;)

Mandarb
07-31-2012, 07:23 AM
No, it's a D on mine...But I'm a little old-fashioned. ;)

Ahh - A D F# B tuning.

cheekmeat
07-31-2012, 07:35 AM
Ahh - A D F# B tuning.

Tee-Hee. Yeah. It's the way I learned, so I'm kind of stuck with it.

Mandarb
07-31-2012, 07:36 AM
Tee-Hee. Yeah. It's the way I learned, so I'm kind of stuck with it.

Hey - whatever works. Enjoy!

OldePhart
07-31-2012, 12:28 PM
For me the issue is not whether or not a steel string electric is a uke or not - it clearly is. For me it's an issue of why would I (as a guitar and uke player) want one? I can get much the same effect playing up the neck on one of my electric guitars and the tone will be much better. Playing high up the neck changes the location of the magnetic pickup relative to the vibrating string and gives a much smoother, rounder tone. So, playing the same pitch on a full-scale guitar as the open string on a uke is basically going to sound better.

Now, for somebody who wants an "electric guitar sound" and who plays ukulele but not guitar - go for it! It's certainly an easy way to add some new tricks to your pallette. For guys like me who play guitar and have a wall full of electric guitars I just can't get excited about an electric steel-string uke (even though the Kamoas look nice).

John

kevlarian
07-31-2012, 12:37 PM
I am currently looking to purchase a "silent" electric Uke so I can play at night when my family is asleep and not wake them... just saying. I love my Uke, but there is an advantage to change.

singh44s
07-31-2012, 05:15 PM
I am currently looking to purchase a "silent" electric Uke so I can play at night when my family is asleep and not wake them... just saying. I love my Uke, but there is an advantage to change.

The most common answers to this request are the Eleuke and the Risa uke families.

I'd like to add the Epiphone Les Paul concert uke (available through most big box/ mail order retailers). I had a chance to "play*" with one during the NY Uke Fest, and once more when I picked up my Vox mini, and it felt good without being overtly loud in acoustic mode.

*note: I still consider myself to be quite the beginner, and will likely never work out these "chord" things everyone keeps going on about.(>_<; )\

kissing
07-31-2012, 08:55 PM
Looks can be deceiving with the Epiphone Les Paul uke. Its actually quite a decently loud acoustic, as far as laminate acoustics go.

It just needs good strings. I have d'addario Pro-artes on mine, and it really sings. It sounds better to my ears than most other ukes of this price range

pulelehua
08-01-2012, 12:15 AM
I think there's a much better case to be made that a baritone isn't an ukulele than that a solid-body, electric re-entrant ukulele isn't an ukulele.

kissing
08-01-2012, 03:30 AM
I think there's a much better case to be made that a baritone isn't an ukulele than that a solid-body, electric re-entrant ukulele isn't an ukulele.

Let alone a baritone solid body electric with steel strings :D

khairijamian
08-01-2012, 04:45 AM
To call an electric uke an electric guitar is the same as calling an acoustic ukulele a classical guitar.

Great point there!

Skrik
08-01-2012, 05:13 AM
Thinking more about this, and taking in all the replies, I see that the electric ukulele is a ukulele in the same way an electric guitar is a guitar. However, electric guitars have a different timbre from classical, or even from steel-string acoustic guitars. I play things on an electric guitar that are simply impossible on an acoustic; and things that may sound great on an acoustic can sound naff on electric. The electric guitar is then, for all intents and purposes, a different instrument.

Is this not the case with ukuleles?

The Big Kahuna
08-01-2012, 05:21 AM
You can take an electric Uke, slap it through a selection of effects in Guitar Rig 5, and it'll come out the other end sounding like an acoustic Uke. Alternatively, I can plug a pickup-equipped acoustic Uke through the same system and make it sound like Rammstein. So what does that make it?

The Big Kahuna
08-01-2012, 05:24 AM
a different instrument

No...same instrument, different sound. Soprano, Concert, Tenor and Baritone all sound different, but they're all Ukes. To stretch the point further: take 10 otherwise identical Ukes, all made from different woods and using different manufacturing methods. They'll sound "different" but they're the same instrument. You need to think of an "instrument" as a concept which encompasses all the similarities we've discussed earlier, such as number of strings, tuning etc, not the sound that comes out of it.

The Big Kahuna
08-01-2012, 05:26 AM
Here's another one. Take a Dobro, tune it to open G and play it with a slide. Is it a guitar, or something else? How about if you lay it across your knees and play it? Has it changed again?

The Big Kahuna
08-01-2012, 05:27 AM
My head hurts.

The Big Kahuna
08-01-2012, 05:28 AM
By the way...I totally get where you're coming from, and I think this has turned into an interesting debate. Your'e wrong, but thanks for your time ;)

Skrik
08-01-2012, 05:55 AM
A harpsichord is a piano.

A kettle drum is a djembe.

A diddly bow is a dulcimer.

A xylophone is a glockenspiel.

Discuss.

:p

The Big Kahuna
08-01-2012, 06:01 AM
I like the Eddie Van Halen Dolphin btw. I'm tempted to take a Flying V Uke, cover it in polka dots and make a Randy Rhoads tribute Uke'

kissing
08-01-2012, 06:07 AM
Thinking more about this, and taking in all the replies, I see that the electric ukulele is a ukulele in the same way an electric guitar is a guitar. However, electric guitars have a different timbre from classical, or even from steel-string acoustic guitars. I play things on an electric guitar that are simply impossible on an acoustic; and things that may sound great on an acoustic can sound naff on electric. The electric guitar is then, for all intents and purposes, a different instrument.

Is this not the case with ukuleles?


Well that's certainly one way of looking at it.
What is a guitar? You're saying that an electric guitar is a "different instrument" to a classical guitar.
Which is kind of true. But they are still both "guitars" as they share common properties, like standard tuning, number of strings, etc. A classical guitarist could pick up an electric guitar, and be capable of "playing" it at some competent level, and vice versa.

I guess then an electric ukulele is a "different instrument" to an acoustic ukulele.
But they're still both ukuleles.


Doesn't matter what you call it, or how you framework it. A solid body electric ukulele is what it is.
It's described as a solid body electric ukulele, and in my view, that's the best description.
It would be silly to call it something like a tiny-electric-guitar-with-4-strings-only-and-string-spacing-and-size-and-fretboard-profile-of-an-ukulele-but-it's-not-an-ukulele.

I think "electric ukulele" is a more fitting title than that.



And there seem to be some people who just assume that an electric ukulele sounds exactly like an electric guitar.
Newsflash, they do not! They share similar build and hardware (steel-strings, magnetic pickups), but the short scale length, string gauges, playability, etc.. all change the sound. A short-scale electric ukulele doesn't have quite the depth and sustain as a full-scale guitar, but it does have a crisper, sparklier quality to the sound.

Just as we attribute the different tone of an acoustic ukulele to a classical guitar, again due to shorter scale length, and smaller body size, playability, string gauges, etc.

cheekmeat
08-01-2012, 06:18 AM
A harpsichord is a piano. No.
A kettle drum is a djembe. It's the other way around.
A diddly bow is a dulcimer. These aren't real instruments to begin with.
A xylophone is a glockenspiel. I dare you to say that in front of a marimba!

Discussion settled.

Also I would like to apologize for my demure joshing earlier. It's time to take a stand!


You make a D chord 2220 on one...
...it's a ukulele!

No! You make a D chord by fretting 0003 on a soprano uke tuned aDF#B, or you may as well be playing a jaw harp.

Enjoy the rest of your day.

OldePhart
08-01-2012, 07:39 AM
A harpsichord is a piano.
Close enough for government work.


A kettle drum is a djembe.No, several differences in construction that also affect not only timbre but how the instrument is played.



A diddly bow is a dulcimer.

Diddly bow is not fretted, dulcimer is (unless you're talking hammered dulcimer in which case the differences are even more obvious).



A xylophone is a glockenspiel.Glockenwhat? - Watch your language, bub! :)


And in case there is any doubt...all of the above falls squarely in my "who gives a rat's patootie" category. :)

John

bazmaz
08-01-2012, 08:08 AM
Does it matter?

It's about the vernacular - if it's got four strings, tuned like a uke, scale length of the standard uke sizes, then to the majority of uke players, it's an electric uke. End of.

And it's that because that is what the majority will recognise it as.

The alternative is a whole new name.

And I don't agree that ukulele means it must have gut strings. By that logic, a Stratocaster isn't an electric GUITAR

The Big Kahuna
08-01-2012, 08:23 AM
Does it matter?

Not in the slightest, but we're having fun! :nana:

kevlarian
08-01-2012, 08:41 AM
Is an electric guitar any less of a "guitar" because it is not acoustic? No.
Then why should an electric Uke be any less of a Uke because it is not acoustic?

The Big Kahuna
08-01-2012, 09:26 AM
Even a solid piece of wood (or, indeed, anything) has acoustic properties. So all electric guitars are mis-named. They're solid acoustics.

pulelehua
08-01-2012, 12:26 PM
I was thinking about this thread, and that got me thinking about monkeys:

Spider monkey
Howler monkey
Squirrel monkey
White-faced saki monkey

These are all monkeys. We call them all monkeys. But no one gets bent out of shape if you insist, correctly, that they're all different. Likewise, no one gets bent out of shape if you insist, correctly, that they're all monkeys.

If they were all EXACTLY the same, we'd only need one word: monkey. The fact that they're not means that you need an adjective.

Soprano ukulele
Solid-body ukulele
Dulcimulele


Bang. Grammar.

Skrik
08-01-2012, 08:42 PM
Coming up: baritone ukulele and tenor guitar -- same instrument.

Brad Bordessa
08-01-2012, 10:20 PM
Coming up: baritone ukulele and tenor guitar -- same instrument.

Don't make me laugh!

kissing
08-02-2012, 02:14 AM
Coming up: baritone ukulele and tenor guitar -- same instrument.

I've got several baritone ukes and several tenor guitars.
I'll stop you right in your tracks and say that they are very different.

Other than to troll, what would be the point :p

Mim
08-02-2012, 02:33 AM
I think if you play ukulele, it is great that there are so many options to get differant sounds for the type of music you like to play, or... heck, just for fun! Steel strings are yet another alternative and a lot of fun.

Think of all the variations and their purpose! The 8 string is a blast! Nice full sound! The Eleuke is great for silent practice as well as for the stage so that people who play in bands can compete with the sound of other instruments when playing things like rock (I sold an Eleuke to a heavy metal Italian rock group... it is awe-some!). Banjo uke is great for people who love that country/bluegrass/tin-pan alley sound. Heck, the Kala pocket uke is like a functional toy. It plays music, yet is so teenie tiny!

Therefore I think the streel string Electric is just yet another option for ukulele players who may want a differant sound and honestly... why steel string? I submit to you... why not?

I embrace all variations of ukulele, because if it leads to someone having a great time playing music using the skills they already have... then... heck yeah! Uke On!

Wicked
08-02-2012, 06:21 AM
Coming up: baritone ukulele and tenor guitar -- same instrument.

Ha!.... I almost made the same comment, but thought it would put people into a rabid froth.

The Big Kahuna
08-02-2012, 06:49 AM
We should make this the official "UU Trolling Allowed" thread.

Unless we get a visit from the Soprano fanboys with their toy Ukes...

cheekmeat
08-02-2012, 07:22 AM
Unless we get a visit from the True Ukers with their Soprano Ukes...

We are already here.

I fixed your quote above to make it make sense, BTW, heathen.


You're welcome.

The Big Kahuna
08-02-2012, 07:37 AM
We are already here.

I fixed your quote above because it made me cry, BTW, heathen.


You're welcome.


Thanks m8, I appreciate it :)

Skrik
08-02-2012, 11:35 PM
Just so it's been said, this thread wasn't conceived as a troll. My next claim, however, will be that the only real ukulele is the soprano. All others are derivatives, fakes.

pulelehua
08-03-2012, 03:26 AM
...made by Madeiran furniture makers.

Plainsong
08-04-2012, 12:24 AM
And no true ukulele has ears. The ones with ears are toy guitars.;)

(Count me in the electric ukulele is an ukulele crowd!)

ichadwick
08-13-2012, 06:03 AM
You make a D chord 2220 on one...
...it's a ukulele!
That makes a baritone uke a.... what?

ichadwick
08-13-2012, 06:14 AM
Just so it's been said, this thread wasn't conceived as a troll. My next claim, however, will be that the only real ukulele is the soprano. All others are derivatives, fakes.
The only real chordophone is a lute... all the others are derivative... ;-)

The Big Kahuna
08-13-2012, 06:44 AM
I'm just waiting for the emergence of a 140 year old Portagee with a claim for patent infringement.

Brad Bordessa
08-13-2012, 09:48 AM
Give me 120 years...!

Paul December
08-13-2012, 02:47 PM
That makes a baritone uke a.... what?

That's a dangerous question! ;)

Pondoro
08-13-2012, 03:27 PM
A tenor guitar purist will claim that a tenor guitar must be tuned in fifths, like a tenor banjo - CGDA. A more tolerant tenor guitarist will consider "Chicago Tuning" (DGBE) an acceptable alternative. Chicago tuning of a tenor guitar makes it similar to a baritone uke in tuning, but it still has a much longer scale. Since ukulele players tune sopranos, concerts and tenors identically but name them based on scale length then logically the tenor guitar should get a different name from the baritone uke - it would be a bass or a contrabaritone ukulele!

It is really crazy that we have numerous instruments with the same tuning but different names, guitarists would not do this. But there you have it.

I would prefer to name an instrument based on tuning and number of strings - so anything with 4 strings tuned gCEA would be a uke, regardless of body type or string material. But I'd still call it a banjo uke if it has a skin soundboard!

I don't know where this stops.

Skrik
08-14-2012, 02:12 AM
I don't know where this stops.

The bass "ukulele" is really a __________ ?

OldePhart
08-14-2012, 07:53 AM
The bass "ukulele" is really a __________ ?

...fretted viola?

Costo
08-14-2012, 01:38 PM
This is a real question : what makes the baritone uke a uke ?

The Big Kahuna
08-14-2012, 08:03 PM
Denial. :)

cb56
05-26-2014, 04:49 AM
67106I don't care what you call them, I'm still playing them BWwwaaahahahaha
http://i943.photobucket.com/albums/ad275/cblood1956/3Tenors_zpsc927009a.jpg (http://s943.photobucket.com/user/cblood1956/media/3Tenors_zpsc927009a.jpg.html)

kissing
05-26-2014, 05:23 AM
How many "ukuleles" do you see?

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y121/pactio_kiss/20140527_011904_zps90a49d0f.jpg (http://s4.photobucket.com/user/pactio_kiss/media/20140527_011904_zps90a49d0f.jpg.html)

Dane
05-26-2014, 05:33 AM
Is this still a violin? It has 5 strings and is electric. I think so.

http://www.gigasonic.com/images/nsnxt5vnsbf.jpg

Some purists might say that anything larger than a soprano and tuned in anything other than D (A D F# B) isn't an ukulele.

For me, it's all about the scale length and body sizing. It's the tuning and fretboard shape. It's the way it feels. It's the take it and play it anywhere feeling. I don't feel any of this when I pick up a guitar. If there is any size of ukulele to nitpick about being a proper ukulele, it would be the baritone. If we're tuning a baritone like a guitar... but it's just missing 2 strings, and has no high G..... why are we bothering?

I play tenor because it's the smallest size I can play without hurting my fingers, and I enjoy its tone the most. I've been playing a lot of guilele recently. I could play a whole song on just the 1-4 strings, it definitely "sounds" like an ukulele. But is it? Or is it a requinto guitar? But that has a different scale length....

An upright bass and a bass guitar are both called a bass... So what do you call a fretless bass guitar?............. Also are a bass, a cello, and a violin all that different?

Maybe an ukulele is really just a Braguinha, or a Rajao, and maybe there is no such thing as an "ukulele".

You can call it whatever you want but I'll still play it. The whole point of having sub-names under the ukulele heading is that they look, feel, play, and sound different. I don't care what you name it, so long as I can find what I am looking for on google with the proper keywords.

What do you think they called this in the year 1670? Looks like a baritone Guilele to me. But I'm guessing that wasn't its name.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/70/Jan_Vermeer_van_Delft_013.jpg/524px-Jan_Vermeer_van_Delft_013.jpg

UkerDanno
05-26-2014, 06:43 AM
How many "ukuleles" do you see?

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y121/pactio_kiss/20140527_011904_zps90a49d0f.jpg (http://s4.photobucket.com/user/pactio_kiss/media/20140527_011904_zps90a49d0f.jpg.html)

I only see one ;-D

Kimosabe
05-26-2014, 07:19 AM
Show us what you play on the dang thing. It's the music that matters. I put South Coast classical metal strings on my Kanilea tenor and it sounded great. Did it stop being a uke? I don't care. Is Renaissance music not uke music? Is jazz not uke music? It's all words. The play's the thing in which we catch the conscience of the king.

JonThysell
05-26-2014, 07:31 AM
How many "ukuleles" do you see?

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y121/pactio_kiss/20140527_011904_zps90a49d0f.jpg (http://s4.photobucket.com/user/pactio_kiss/media/20140527_011904_zps90a49d0f.jpg.html)

I see five, but I haven't updated my prescription in a while...

iamesperambient
05-26-2014, 08:56 AM
I see five, but I haven't updated my prescription in a while...

the bean shaped rise is awesome i'd love to get my hands on one.

OldePhart
05-26-2014, 01:31 PM
How many "ukuleles" do you see?

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y121/pactio_kiss/20140527_011904_zps90a49d0f.jpg (http://s4.photobucket.com/user/pactio_kiss/media/20140527_011904_zps90a49d0f.jpg.html)

Eight...do I need a designated driver?

CeeJay
05-26-2014, 01:42 PM
How many "ukuleles" do you see?

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y121/pactio_kiss/20140527_011904_zps90a49d0f.jpg (http://s4.photobucket.com/user/pactio_kiss/media/20140527_011904_zps90a49d0f.jpg.html)

None .....I is immediately drawn to da Crunchy Nut Cornflakes ....hold it right there while I gets me bowl and sum milluk......wot are dese wooden fings dat are getting in da way.......???

Ramart
05-26-2014, 01:47 PM
Well said Shrik. I couldn't agree more. But then again, what do I know? If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it's a duck. But if it doesn't, then is it really a duck?

I'm sure that kissing will respectfully disagree. But there are many different types of guitars,(acoustic, electric, classical to name a few), but they are all still called guitars.

Your comment seems contradictory. Despite your agreement with Shrik, you go on to note that acoustic, electric, classical, etc., guitars are all still just "guitars" when any is referred to generically. Same with ukuleles, I'd think. Putting induction pickups on a uke doesn't make it a mandolin, whose standard tuning is different from ukes' standard tuning modes and whose four courses of strings are always doubled, unlike most ukes.

CeeJay
05-26-2014, 01:50 PM
Actually I'd quite like a go on a steel strung elecky uke...like electric guitars you don't just play the tool in your hand but the little black box on the other end of the wire .....

I'm an indifferent guitarist , I tried to play electric like acoustic and vice versa...the epiphany never really happened ...left me uke languishing in the shed for about
30 odd years ...but now it all starts to make so much more sense ...... ah well.....I'll leave you to your in-fighting and bitching (joke :rolleyes:) and argyooing about what are or isn't not ookooleleles...and go and have a strum.....or a twang ......

iamesperambient
05-27-2014, 10:22 PM
A ukulele is an acoustic chordophone of certain dimensions that has four (courses of) gut (or equivalent) strings. Sticking an acoustic pickup in a ukulele doesn't essentially change things. Giving it a solid body to control feedback is a greater change, but the instrument still sounds and feels like a ukulele.

Slap some steel strings on the thing, however, so that you can use an induction pickup in the manner of an electric guitar, and you have changed the nature of the instrument. The sound changes, the way it plays changes, and the way it looks changes.

What it has changed into, I'm not sure -- I consider it closer to a mandolin than a ukulele.

I've been thinking about this for a while, and I understand that I am being somewhat controversial, given that there are other instruments in the ukulele family with steel strings (the tiple, for example). I don't mind the advent of a new instrument, but I have difficulty thinking of the steel-stringed electric ukulele as a ukulele.

Anyone else want to throw in their $0.02?

I disagree. Than in this case the electric guitar is not a guitar, only gut strung classical guitars are real 'guitars' in fact
with this mind set the guitar is just a wanna be lute. All instruments evolve with innovation, experimentation and leads to new possibilities
and remember the uke is already an adaptation of another instrument.

iamesperambient
05-27-2014, 10:28 PM
This is a real question : what makes the baritone uke a uke ?

Size, technique, nylon strings, 4 string the fact that it was adapted from the uke.
Tenor's were originally designed for linear C tuning, baritone being a lower voice
than tenor if used in linear is 5 semi tones lower, if you look at the concept of voicing
in other instruments baritone is just the lower register in the ukulele family.

Kind of urks me when people crap on the baritone.

iamesperambient
05-27-2014, 10:30 PM
Just so it's been said, this thread wasn't conceived as a troll. My next claim, however, will be that the only real ukulele is the soprano. All others are derivatives, fakes.

I guess lyle ritz, jake and james hill all play 'fake ukuleles' now this has to be a troll sorry.

iamesperambient
05-27-2014, 10:33 PM
Coming up: baritone ukulele and tenor guitar -- same instrument.

Tenor guitar, tuned in 5ths, designed for tenor banjo players, longer scale metal strings (for acoustic's and electrics)
baritone uke shorter scale designed for ukers who want a lower register, has nylon strings, tuned in linear G
5 semi tones lower than a Tenor tuned in Linear C. Not the same instrument what so ever. sorry bro.

kissing
05-27-2014, 10:58 PM
I think most people who make blanket statements like "baritone uke = tenor guitar or electric ukulele = guitar/mandolin have not had much experience with these instruments.


I have owned a tenor guitar. I have owned electric ukuleles, mandolins... .. i also play classical, acoustic, electric and bass guitar regularly. they are all very different. I even had a banjo uke.. whats that?

The differences in scale, neck, width, etc makes a huge difference to how you play the instrument.

An electric ukulele "sounds" like an electric guitar, but the vehicle is an ukulele dimension neck/body/string tuning. You cannot describe an electric uke as a mandolin or guitar.. because electric ukulele will always be the best description for it.

iamesperambient
05-27-2014, 11:06 PM
I think most people who make blanket statements like "baritone uke = tenor guitar or electric ukulele = guitar/mandolin have not had much experience with these instruments.


I have owned a tenor guitar. I have owned electric ukuleles, mandolins... they are all very different. I even had a banjo uke.. whats that??

I have even had an electric mandolin from Epiphone and play electric guitar regularly

The differences in scale, neck, width, etc makes a huge difference to how you play the instrument.

An electric ukulele "sounds" like an electric guitar, but the vehicle is an ukulele dimension neck/body/string tuning. You cannot describe an electric uke as a mandolin or guitar.. because electric ukulele will always be the best description for it.

I agree. I have an electric steel stringed baritone ukulele. Its shaped like a big pineapple uke plays like a bari uke
and is designed for baritone ukulele players. Blue star also makes a 'mandoblaster' designed for mandolin players
which has the same specs spacing/size wise for mandolin players who are used to that instrument.

Its a factor about the size/dimensions but also about the tuning, and technique in which you play the instrument
and what instrument player was in mind when designing the electric version of the instrument.

The Baritone uke = tenor guitar is just pure ignorance of both instruments.

iamesperambient
05-27-2014, 11:07 PM
I think most people who make blanket statements like "baritone uke = tenor guitar or electric ukulele = guitar/mandolin have not had much experience with these instruments.


I have owned a tenor guitar. I have owned electric ukuleles, mandolins... they are all very different. I even had a banjo uke.. whats that??

I have even had an electric mandolin from Epiphone and play electric guitar regularly

The differences in scale, neck, width, etc makes a huge difference to how you play the instrument.

An electric ukulele "sounds" like an electric guitar, but the vehicle is an ukulele dimension neck/body/string tuning. You cannot describe an electric uke as a mandolin or guitar.. because electric ukulele will always be the best description for it.

not to mention electric guitar has a totally different register/texture and style in which it's played, and a mandolin being in 5ths has a totally different sound.
And the neck on a mandolin being so much thinner handles so much differently than a ukulele. It's not the same thing electric uke is exactly what it is.