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Yestyn The Great
08-09-2012, 11:38 AM
I recently purchased a bruceweiart tenor ukulele of of e-bay for about 100 dollars. It has not arrived yet but after looking at the pictures a bit more I noticed that the bridge did not look straight. But after seeing a picture of a custom ukulele I noticed that the bridge on it did not look straight either. Is this normal. And if it is why dose my OS tenor have a straight bridge?

peewee
08-09-2012, 12:16 PM
Probably because the photos were shot with cheap lenses and not straight-on.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
08-09-2012, 12:34 PM
Agreed with the comment above.
A bridge should be perpendicular to the body. No exceptions that I'm aware of. Sometimes the saddle itself will be slanted to provide overall string compensation but that certainly isn't the case on the uke you mentioned. To find the correct bridge position, measure the distance between the leading edge of the nut and the middle of the 12th fret and multiply by two. Then a couple of mm for string compensation depending upon the action (string height) you choose. This will give you the distance between the leading edge of the nut and the center of the saddle.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
08-09-2012, 01:44 PM
Unless its a fan fret uke, which i never heard of someone doing.

Brad Bordessa
08-09-2012, 02:09 PM
Unless its a fan fret uke, which i never heard of someone doing.

I'm waiting... :iwant:

Yestyn The Great
08-09-2012, 02:53 PM
I would post pictures of bolth ukes but dose anyone know how to post on an I pod?

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
08-09-2012, 03:08 PM
I'm waiting... :iwant:

ill make you one :)

Brad Bordessa
08-09-2012, 04:20 PM
Is that a sponsorship offer?:)

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
08-09-2012, 04:25 PM
Unless its a fan fret uke, which i never heard of someone doing.

Nothing could be more ridiculous on an ukulele.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
08-09-2012, 04:26 PM
I'm waiting... :iwant:

And why would you want one?

Brad Bordessa
08-09-2012, 04:32 PM
And why would you want one?

I like the profile pic, Chuck. It's like mine and sends the "we're doomed" message.

I want one because it is an interesting concept. I can imagine the feel (I think) and it seems like something my fingers would like. Maybe "want to try one" is a better statement. Keep on keeping me honest...

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
08-09-2012, 04:43 PM
Nothing could be more ridiculous on an ukulele.

Indeed. It would look like a boomerang, one which I hope would never come back. I handled a fan fret guitar on the weekend for the first time. Strange things to look at but you dont really 'feel' the strangeness if you dont look at it. But this neck was still separate from the body.

I think a normal uke with an inlay of a fanned fret uke on it would be a good compromise ;) Equally strange though.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
08-09-2012, 06:10 PM
I like the profile pic, Chuck. It's like mine and sends the "we're doomed" message.

Not at all my intention. You really need to start watching AMC Brad.

maclay
08-09-2012, 06:30 PM
Maybe the sides were bent by hand.....If the builder doesn't do it properly, the body will be asymmetric making the bridge appear to be crooked.
Or they could have just glued it on wrong...I have seen it happen before.

AndrewKuker
08-10-2012, 03:30 AM
I want one because it is an interesting concept. I can imagine the feel (I think) and it seems like something my fingers would like. Maybe "want to try one" is a better statement. Keep on keeping me honest...

You could have varying degrees of fan . Like not so drastic but enough to compensate for the imbalance in string tension, especially for Plain Low G players. I too was surprised when playing a guitar with the Novak system how easy it was. And I always liked it on bass because of the Low b floppy issue but ukulele could use a little spread to perfect balance. Not ridiculous at all, or at least not the most ridiculous. But the fretboard slots would be insanely hard to calculate perfectly. that would take a hardcore geek session to math that out. fretless!! now thats more ridiculous already, even with a straight bridge.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
08-10-2012, 07:02 AM
http://www.ekips.org/tools/guitar/fretfind2d/

The fellow I spoke to used this method with the attached link-
Put in the different scale lengths, print it out full scale, lay it on some fret template material and carefully hand cut on the lines.

There is an articulated jig to make too, but that's another story.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
08-10-2012, 07:20 AM
Concepts aren't necessarily practical on an ukulele scale. Talk to the guy who's built and played one.

AndrewKuker
08-10-2012, 11:37 AM
Concepts aren't necessarily practical on an ukulele scale. Talk to the guy who's built and played one.

Who's that?

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
08-10-2012, 11:46 AM
Who's that?

That's exactly my point. It's hardly practical on a ukulele.
Unless I'm misreading it I think the comment regarding fan frets was made in jest. I don't know of any builder that would invest the time to pursue such a thing on ukuleles, neither the money nor the demand is there. Can it be done? Certainly. I just don't think we're going to be seeing fan frets on ukuleles any time soon.
Then again, Beau promised to build one for Brad so who knows.

AndrewKuker
08-10-2012, 12:33 PM
Because it hasn't been done is no argument toward it being impractical. From a musical standpoint, or even the pursuit of lutherie, it could be more practical then all the time spent on fancy inlays. Personally I love beautiful inlays but practicality was never my first interest. A fan fret uke would be easy to play, and would most likely give a more balanced tension which would also improve the performance of an under saddle pickup. I'm rooting for Beau. You can do it! I will buy!

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
08-10-2012, 12:43 PM
You're correct Andrew, I never thought of it that way. Setting aside artistic fulfillment and enjoyment, inlay is impractical in a purely functional sense. It's only practical in my case because people seem to want it. I've been installing arm rest bevels in some ukes now and I see them pretty impractical as well. I guess there's something to be said for Apple for instance in creating something we never knew we wanted.

So go ahead Beau, I'm rooting for you too.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
08-10-2012, 01:21 PM
A fan fret uke would be easy to play, and would most likely give a more balanced tension which would also improve the performance of an under saddle pickup. I'm rooting for Beau.

Maybe. I don't know much about fan fretted string tension, but as the scale length changes, wouldn't that cause an imbalance in tension, an imbalance that is already there due to different string gauges??? But I like your searching attitude in pursuit of lutherie. Someone has to be Captain Kirk.


You're correct Andrew, inlay is totally impractical. It's only practical in my case because people seem to want it. I guess there's something to be said for Apple for instance in creating something we never knew we wanted.

And yeah, come on Beau, I'm rooting for you too.

HAHHA- My original fan fret comment was in jest and I only thought of it because I had handled my first one only 2 days before- But it was a very very very distant possibility of a slanted bridge.

As for fanned frets, I think it is the building equivalent of the tapping technique on a guitar-(like Steve Vai)- Basically, I don't think it is needed on a guitar or uke, and I think it down grades the aesthetics of the bridge area. Lastly and most importantly, so many excellent players have written such immortal songs on 'normal' fretted instruments as to not warrant it being invented. Indeed, whoever thought it up should have.....Let it be.

Having said that, If someone wants to pay me an EXTRA $1000 to get jigged up, make an (or more) experimental uke (the fellow i spoke to had to re angle all the braces to achieve a pleasing/desired sound), get the intonation wrong, make a new bridge...etc..... Actually, make that an extra $2000... :)

In the end, I just want to make great sounding, aesthetically pleasing instruments buts not everyone has the same aesthetics as me- and as Chuck said, Apple made a few $$$ by informing the world that we needed some products we never knew we needed.

Chuck- funny you mention arm bevels- since getting the new issue of American Luthiery, Ill be trying it out with a scoop similar to Pete's but bound everywhere.

Hawaii50- To my knowledge, arm bevels-like Manzer wedges- have always been a comfort thing, unless you put holes in the arm bevel then it becomes a comfort/sound thing.

But i've always wanted to do an R2D2 inlay. I'll do that job for free.

And thanks for all the rooting, its been a while ;)

hawaii 50
08-10-2012, 01:48 PM
[QUOTE=Moore Bettah Ukuleles;1015618]You're correct Andrew, I never thought of it that way. Setting aside artistic fulfillment and enjoyment, inlay is impractical in a purely functional sense. It's only practical in my case because people seem to want it. I've been installing arm rest bevels in some ukes now and I see them pretty impractical as well. I guess there's something to be said for Apple for instance in creating something we never knew we wanted.


>>>>>>>>>>
hey chuck when is your uke with the arm rest bevel going to be done? i would like to see what it looks like//are you going to have sound holes in it like kevin ryan guitars..if so you dont need the sideport?and are you doing in ebony or what kind of wood are you using? i was thinking about this subject lately..you think it more for comfort then better sound?

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
08-10-2012, 01:59 PM
[QUOTE=Moore Bettah Ukuleles;1015618]You're correct Andrew, I never thought of it that way. Setting aside artistic fulfillment and enjoyment, inlay is impractical in a purely functional sense. It's only practical in my case because people seem to want it. I've been installing arm rest bevels in some ukes now and I see them pretty impractical as well. I guess there's something to be said for Apple for instance in creating something we never knew we wanted.


>>>>>>>>>>
hey chuck when is your uke with the arm rest bevel going to be done? i would like to see what it looks like//are you going to have sound holes in it like kevin ryan guitars..if so you dont need the sideport?and are you doing in ebony or what kind of wood are you using? i was thinking about this subject lately..you think it more for comfort then better sound?

PMed you........

AndrewKuker
08-10-2012, 04:29 PM
Maybe. I don't know much about fan fretted string tension, but as the scale length changes, wouldn't that cause an imbalance in tension, an imbalance that is already there due to different string gauges??? But I like your searching attitude in pursuit of lutherie. Someone has to be Captain Kirk.
Mostly referring to some of the fluorocarbon low G sets. Very loose at the G gradually very tight by the A. So it would definitely help that issue, but it was not on the top of my priorities either. I am interested though. The saddle has to slant but the bridge could be designed in a number of ways to still be pleasing aesthetically




Having said that, If someone wants to pay me an EXTRA $1000 to get jigged up, make an (or more) experimental uke (the fellow i spoke to had to re angle all the braces to achieve a pleasing/desired sound), get the intonation wrong, make a new bridge...etc..... Actually, make that an extra $2000...

Haha, I guess Chuck is right, we wont be seeing it anytime soon.

BlackBearUkes
08-10-2012, 04:38 PM
You could have varying degrees of fan . Like not so drastic but enough to compensate for the imbalance in string tension, especially for Plain Low G players. I too was surprised when playing a guitar with the Novak system how easy it was. And I always liked it on bass because of the Low b floppy issue but ukulele could use a little spread to perfect balance. Not ridiculous at all, or at least not the most ridiculous. But the fretboard slots would be insanely hard to calculate perfectly. that would take a hardcore geek session to math that out. fretless!! now thats more ridiculous already, even with a straight bridge.

I have built a couple of ukes with a fan fretboard. It used a soprano scale length on the treble A string and a concert scale length on the low G. I put the two scales together and the other string position just fell into place, not difficult at all. The sixth fret was the center of the fan and it played pretty good and sounded fine. It took a while to sell though, it frightened people.

AndrewKuker
08-10-2012, 04:50 PM
I have built a couple of ukes with a fan fretboard. It used a soprano scale length on the treble A string and a concert scale length on the low G. I put the two scales together and the other string position just fell into place, not difficult at all. The sixth fret was the center of the fan and it played pretty good and sounded fine. It took a while to sell though, it frightened people.

Awesome! Ya so you just marked off the bass side of the fretboard for concert scale and treble side for soprano scale, connect the dots and hand cut your fret slots? I'm sure you could do it for concert/tenor scale just the same. Did you alter bracing? What did you think of the overall intonation?

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
08-10-2012, 04:54 PM
I have built a couple of ukes with a fan fretboard. It used a soprano scale length on the treble A string and a concert scale length on the low G. I put the two scales together and the other string position just fell into place, not difficult at all. The sixth fret was the center of the fan and it played pretty good and sounded fine. It took a while to sell though, it frightened people.

Blackbearukes- You are Captain Kirk!

Any pics out of curiosity???

Now do an R2D2 inlay

BlackBearUkes
08-10-2012, 05:22 PM
Awesome! Ya so you just marked off the bass side of the fretboard for concert scale and treble side for soprano scale, connect the dots and hand cut your fret slots? I'm sure you could do it for concert/tenor scale just the same. Did you alter bracing? What did you think of the overall intonation?

The intonation was fine, just have to treat each string like its own scale and plan the nut and bridge accordingly. You can use any scale length you want, doesn't have to be any particular scale. Just lay out the A and G strings and connect the dots like you said. The slant can be slight or really wild, keeping in mind you have to be able to play the thing without too much strain. The bracing was a simple fan design with a slanted bridge patch under the bridge. The bridge did have quit a slant to it, but it worked out fine. I have some photos somewhere, but my scanner isn't working, maybe I can shoot a digital photos of them.

hawaii 50
08-11-2012, 01:49 PM
[QUOTE=hawaii 50;1015654]

PMed you........

thanks for the info chuck..how long did it take to sell your new tenor today? i missed it as usual..Lol

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
08-11-2012, 02:16 PM
[QUOTE=Moore Bettah Ukuleles;1015656]

thanks for the info chuck..how long did it take to sell your new tenor today? i missed it as usual..Lol

Less than a minute. :)

MGM
08-12-2012, 11:55 PM
I have played and seen several fan fret ukuleles. duane from black bear ukuleles made one about two years ago that i didn't win on ebay as well as several Hawaii custom builders. They were interesting to play but not something that i would want to try on a mass produced uke....more of a fun and neat novelty than a real improvement to playability.