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Bevelsnob
09-07-2012, 06:35 AM
Hi all,

I own a nice Collings Tenor, and love the uke. But I find the Peghed tuners to be imprecise. In fact, I'm surprised Collings chose to use them. They're a nifty concept, with the gears hidden and all, but their accuracy leaves a lot to be desired IMO.

Am I the only one who doesn't like them?
I'm wondering if there's another better product on the market that I could replace these tuners with.

Ideas? Thoughts?

Thanks,
Scott

janeray1940
09-07-2012, 06:39 AM
I just recently encountered Pegheds for the first time on my DaSilva custom, and honestly, I LOVE them. LOVE!! I use an electronic tuner (my ear is not that sophisticated at this point) and this uke rarely even goes out of tune. I can't vouch for how accurate it is, but I think my uke instructor could, and he's never mentioned that I've been out of tune yet.

kirbo
09-07-2012, 06:39 AM
I apologize for going off topic, but dang, your uke is stunning!

Newportlocal
09-07-2012, 07:33 AM
Maybe this

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?69804-New-Gotoh-peg-tuners-from-HOSCO&highlight=Gotoh

hammer40
09-07-2012, 07:44 AM
I'm far from an expert but I feel the same as you. I have had one experience with them and didn't really care for them. They feel "cheap" because of the plastic and I didn't care for the 4:1 ratio, it's more difficult to be precise than a 14:1 tuner. I know the friction tuner "look" is what a lot of folks love, but I don't care for it. I can't vouch for how they stay in tune, but others do say they do that well.

coolkayaker1
09-07-2012, 08:05 AM
I owned a ukulele with Pegheads, and mine stayed in tune, but despite the many who love then, I found them ugly, disproporionately long ooking, frail (if uke slides onto them, they'll break) and they look cheap on an expensive ukulele. That's my take.

Gotoh has the new planetary geared friction style tuners and there's a couple threads on em on UU now. I'll be getting those, without question.

Ukeval
09-07-2012, 08:09 AM
I have some pegheds on my new tenor Glyph, they are precice, accurate and smooth. (and they are made in boxwood, not plastic...)
And I hate the "mickey ears" of some geared tuners...

weerpool
09-07-2012, 08:13 AM
never liked them. too violin-y looking, too plastic-y

wconley
09-07-2012, 08:13 AM
My Donaldson has Peheads and while not as precise as 14:1 geared tuners, I think they're more precise and easier than peg tuners I believe they are designed to replace. Until I learned how to properly tighten them, they didn't stay in tune. I've thought about putting them on my Flea even though they are almost the same price as what I paid used for the Flea. That being said, my Koaloha has quality peg tuners that I find relatively easy to tune and it stays in tune.

ukeeku
09-07-2012, 08:14 AM
I'm far from an expert but I feel the same as you. I have had one experience with them and didn't really care for them. They feel "cheap" because of the plastic and I didn't care for the 4:1 ratio, it's more difficult to be precise than a 14:1 tuner. I know the friction tuner "look" is what a lot of folks love, but I don't care for it. I can't vouch for how they stay in tune, but others do say they do that well.

I love mine, best tuners I have ever used. yes I agree they are a little fast on getting up or down, but I have had better luck with them over any geared tuner. I love how lite they are (Actually weigh less than most friction tuners). Now the cheap buttons issue; mine are ebony, and they can be made out of almost any wood. Check this site out
http://www.pegheds.net/peghed-picturesdetails.html
http://ukeeku.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/pegheds_ebony_button.gif
To each their own. this is my 2 cents.

janeray1940
09-07-2012, 08:20 AM
Oh golly, you mean I could have opted for real wood Pegheads instead of plastic? Huh, didn't know... filing this info away for the next custom :)

OldePhart
09-07-2012, 08:30 AM
Yeah...wood buttons would make them maybe tolerable - I can't stand the plasticky look of the ones I've seen. They look like those tuners on plastic TV Pal ukes... :)

Seriously, I love friction tuners and don't understand all the fuss about having gears. Once you get used to them good friction tuners are no less accurate and no more difficult to use than geared tuners. And, when it comes time to change strings, give me friction tuners every time - even with a string winder geared tuners are annoying to change strings on.

John

Bevelsnob
09-07-2012, 08:31 AM
I apologize for going off topic, but dang, your uke is stunning!

Thanks. It's never off topic to publicly drool over nice wood.

ancient
09-07-2012, 08:45 AM
I have five Collings ukes and love the tuners. I have had no problem with them.Specs and Options: Collings Geared Ukulele Tuners by Pegheds



Featured on Collings Ukes, these new tuners are incredible, once you understand how they work. At first glance, they appear to be standard friction tuners... beneath the surface, however, they are very technologically advanced, with* a patented planetary gear system providing legendary smoothness and precision.

The 4:1 gear reduction allows strings to be tuned more easily and accurately than traditional wood pegs (or Caspari-type mechanisms which require screw drivers or special keys). Tune confidently and securely with the left hand while playing open strings; even during performance!* PEGHEDS tuners return the fine-tuning function to pegs. Strings slide more freely over the smooth, wide nut than over the comparatively sharp edge of the bridge, where stress is concentrated and equilibrium of tension on either side is more difficult to achieve.

PEGHEDS* have a brake mechanism with variable friction. Push in to increase resistance, pull out to decrease; exactly like a traditional wood peg.

savagehenry
09-07-2012, 10:29 AM
I love the pegheads on my Sailor brand, they stay in tune, are easy to use and I think that they look great. I would recommend them to anyone considering them.

stevepetergal
09-07-2012, 11:21 AM
I've never had them. My top priority for tuners is accuracy. I don't care so much about looks. If they made 200 to 1 ratio tuners, I'd probably get them. But some people want the look of the old fashioned peg tuners and the Pegheds offer a very good compromise. Better accuracy than old standards and vintage looks. I can understand the people who love them so much.
As to the length of them, I understand they are now making shorter ones specifically for small instruments like ukuleles.

Dan Uke
09-07-2012, 11:40 AM
I love them...When I first started playing the uke, I cared so much about intonation that I was constantly checking it. As I got better, I'm not as concerned and I don't need the 18 to 1 gear ratio. I realized that the note can change by how hard I press it, accidentally bending the note, etc. Now I enjoy the uke more than ever as I just play!!

If you really care about being in tune, you wouldn't use a Snark but one that is much more precise.

ksiegel
09-07-2012, 11:41 AM
I've got Pegheds on my Fluke and Firefly banjo uke.

They will be on an upcoming custom uke, as well.

I was amazed by how well they work, and the precision and accuracy.

I've got some geared tuners that are great,and some that are "meh". I've got 5-ster planetary tuners on my 5-string (One of which won't hold tight after 25-30 years Doesn't anything last? [haven't called StewMac about it yet, however.]) Keeping in mind that your mileage may vary, I find the PegHeds the best bang for my buck, and intend to stay with them for the long run.

I haven't really been able to get the hang of too many friction tuners as of yet, but have no doubt that if/when I do, I'll be happy with them as well.



-Kurt

bearbike137
09-07-2012, 11:50 AM
I have five Collings ukes and love the tuners. I have had no problem with them.Specs and Options: Collings Geared Ukulele Tuners by Pegheds



Featured on Collings Ukes, these new tuners are incredible, once you understand how they work. At first glance, they appear to be standard friction tuners... beneath the surface, however, they are very technologically advanced, with* a patented planetary gear system providing legendary smoothness and precision.

The 4:1 gear reduction allows strings to be tuned more easily and accurately than traditional wood pegs (or Caspari-type mechanisms which require screw drivers or special keys). Tune confidently and securely with the left hand while playing open strings; even during performance!* PEGHEDS tuners return the fine-tuning function to pegs. Strings slide more freely over the smooth, wide nut than over the comparatively sharp edge of the bridge, where stress is concentrated and equilibrium of tension on either side is more difficult to achieve.

PEGHEDS* have a brake mechanism with variable friction. Push in to increase resistance, pull out to decrease; exactly like a traditional wood peg.

This. I love the tuners on Collings ukes. Best I have encountered.

didgeridoo2
09-07-2012, 12:44 PM
I will always choose pegheads if given the chance. I have them on two ukes and love them. My William King has very nice gotoh sg381 tuners. I think they are 16:1. They are incredibly smooth and look nice on a oversized tenor, but I'd choose the lighter pegheads next time.

nix
09-07-2012, 03:09 PM
I'm another Peghed fan. I had them put on my Flea and haven't bought a uke without them since. I've even got a custom Boat Paddle in the works and it is going to have Pegheds. I think they are wonderfully accurate and they don't take forever to wind up when you need to put on new strings. I enjoy how light they are and I appreciate how unobtrusive their appearance is, even with the plastic buttons.

Nix

Markr1
09-07-2012, 03:22 PM
I really like the pegheads on my collings. Wouldn't change them for anything. They work perfectly.

erivel
09-07-2012, 04:58 PM
Got them on my concert and I think they're just ok. They're a little awkward. I prefer the Grover open back tuners on my tenors. Thought about switching them out, but I'll keep them on for now...

Tim Mullins
09-07-2012, 05:40 PM
I recently got a Collings UC-1, so add me to the Peghed lovers group. I really like the look of straight-through friction tuners, but after fifteen years of using them these Pegheds are just great--smooth, precise and stay in tune. They also go with the clean simple style of the UC-1 and they (and the uke) are very light. I also think that a four-to-one ratio is just about right for Nylgut strings.

Briangriffinukuleles
09-07-2012, 07:09 PM
I have chosen to install Pegheds on any uke I make unless a client chooses otherwise. I like their light weight allowing me to build a uke that balances, I love their 4/1 gear ratio, all anyone needs for a ukulele. I love the fact that if I make buttons of any wood I like they will install them without cost so you can have peg heads with koa, rosewood, ebony or whatever. I love their looks, traditional, classic, understated, They work great, hold their tune perfectly, easy to adjust. a bit pricey, a little challenging to install, maybe less rugged than a screwed on geared tuner, but they are my tuner of choice.

TheCraftedCow
09-07-2012, 08:41 PM
Perhaps there should be an instruction manual on my website www.pegheds.net on how to properly use them. The term plastic in the construction is limited only to the composite buttons prior to June of this year. There is a visible mold mark which can be removed with some 600 grit sand paper. A previous supplier would flap sander them , but charged $5 for each one for his time and effort. Since June of this year, the 7.5mm and 8.5 mm grips(buttons) look more like ebony because of the different shape and colour. The grips also come in rosewood, boxwood and ebony. The outer case is anodized aluminum. The inner shaft and hypoid gears are made of the same grade steel as expensive allen wrenches. PEGHEDS also come in two shaft lengths. Collins uses the longer of the two. One is 51mm from tip to tip and the other is 57mm tip to tip. There is a new chrome anodized unit with ivoroid buttons in development right now. There will also be a new 51mm unit within the next couple of months.
4:1 is an adequate ratio for nylon strings, and the lower wound ones. For long steel stringed guitars there is a 16:1 ratio PEGHED. That amount of leverage is not necessary for ukulele or banjo strings.
Did you know PEGHEDS are warranted to work properly or they will be replaced or repaired? I do question what "if a uke slides onto them they will break" means. The aluminum shaft will get jaw marks and go through the annealing if locking pliers are used on them, too. If an instrument is not in one's hands, it should be in its case or a bonified instrument holding stand. Your expensive ukulele will scratch and ding if you don't care for it properly. PEGHEDS are 5 to 7 grams per PEGHED as compared to the new Gotoh unit at 15 grams per tuner. That's 20 gms as opposed to 60gms. From $48 to $60 per set is less than the least expensive Gotoh. What is their warranty and internal material? We have makers who send their own buttons, and they are put on by the maker at no extra cost. If you want to know the specs that buttons must be to be mounted to PEGHED mechanisms, write to thecraftedcow@comcast.net and I will let you know. Dirk at Southcoast is one who has his units fitted with his own buttons.

I apologise to those who do not know how to properly set the unit to operate at its proper performance level. I will talk to the maker in South Carolina tomorrow morning and we will make couple of paragraphs which I will include in my website. Any place I advertise them for sale, and to everyone to whom I sell sets as an individual or as a builder, I will tell them instructions for optimum useage are available at www.pegheds.net . If you want to see a breakdown of what's inside, look at www.pegheds.com . AFTERTHOUGHT: Too much like a violin peg--- I have a couple of old Martin rosewood friction pegs. They are the same length as the 57mm long PEGHEDS used by Collins and Mya-Moe.

The Big Kahuna
09-08-2012, 12:38 AM
Check your keyboard dude, there appears to be something wrong with the "P", "E", "G", "H", "D" and "S" keys.

Markr1
09-08-2012, 02:27 AM
I just checked out my "P","E","G"."H","D" and "S" keys and they seem just fine. Anyone else having trouble with theirs?

dkcrown
09-08-2012, 02:33 AM
I like em. But I like quality geared tuners as well. It depends on the uke.

peterp
09-08-2012, 05:33 AM
they might be a little tricky to use on a tenor. i have them on soprano and concert moore bettah ukes, and they don't slip much.

ancient
09-08-2012, 06:05 AM
They work great on my Collings Tenor ukes.

hawaii 50
09-08-2012, 07:18 AM
i thought the whole idea of the peghed tuners was to have an old school look with modern tech?i like these tuners for the old school looks,,the new Gotoh ones look like it should be on a banjo?

Plainsong
09-08-2012, 01:42 PM
No, you aren't the only one. I have them on my Sailor, and I really don't get how these beat a _good_ set of frictions, because they just don't. I'm glad I got them though, because now I know what I prefer. But yeah, really imprecise.

edit to add - No slipage, they stay in tune, but just aren't precise to dial in the pitch in the first place.


Hi all,

I own a nice Collings Tenor, and love the uke. But I find the Peghed tuners to be imprecise. In fact, I'm surprised Collings chose to use them. They're a nifty concept, with the gears hidden and all, but their accuracy leaves a lot to be desired IMO.

Am I the only one who doesn't like them?
I'm wondering if there's another better product on the market that I could replace these tuners with.

Ideas? Thoughts?

Thanks,
Scott

Hippie Dribble
09-08-2012, 08:24 PM
I think they're awesome. But I also think a good quality set of friction tuners can be awesome too, just takes a bit to get the hang of using them properly. Duane Heilman from Black Bear ukes is the go-to man for handcrafting gorgeous natural wood - or coloured plastic for that matter - tuning knobs for friction tuners. I do think pegheds are great because of their lightness, I have found them to be incredibly precise instruments to use and hold pitch extremely well.

The options, as mentioned, have increased on these devices now. The length chosen can be shorter, and natural wood is also now an option for the buttons.

Ukeval
09-08-2012, 08:47 PM
42743
Yes I have the "Strad" model with boxwood buttons. Looks fine and works perfectly.

bazmaz
09-08-2012, 10:05 PM
For me, an excellent quality set of frictions is hard to best, so don't see the point in changing mine. I have zero issues with those on my koaloha.

ScooterD35
09-09-2012, 04:43 AM
My tenor Koa Fluke and my FireFly (both bought used) both came with Pegheads and I like them just fine.

As far as your Collings, if you don't mind the look of traditional geared tuners, Waverly tuners are pretty much the best there is and well worth the money IMHO.

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Tuners/Ukulele_tuners/Waverly_Ukulele_Tuners.html?tab=Details


Scooter

mike hardee
09-13-2012, 01:14 PM
I have no problem tuning accurately with the Pegheds on my Collings tenor using a headstock tuner. They hold tuning just fine. You do need to push in or pull out while tuning to get the "feel" one prefers. Push in for a tighter tuner, pull out for less tension.

Since I was used to geared tuners I was concerned that the 4:1 ratio would be too low, but not at all. Less weight equals more sustain, and I think they look classy. And I don't have to use a winder when restringing.

If you are into high ratio geared tuners you could always use a set of Steinberger gearless tuners: http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Tuners/Guitar,_solid_peghead_tuners/Steinberger_Gearless_Tuners.html?tab=Pictures

wendellfiddler
09-13-2012, 01:20 PM
I love my pegheds - but they do take a little getting used to and you have to learn to adjust the tension by pushing or pulling them in or out - gently.

The inventor of peghed tuners, Chuck Herin, will swap your plastic buttons for wood ones if you send him your uke (or go to the peghed facility in SC). More recent Collings ukes have the "improved" plastic pegs that look like ebony - earlier ones are more obviously plastic. But they all work the same.

Doug

Paul December
09-13-2012, 01:40 PM
Less weight equals more sustain
I can't believe there would be any measurable difference in sustain... can there?

coolkayaker1
09-13-2012, 04:55 PM
For me, an excellent quality set of frictions is hard to best, so don't see the point in changing mine. I have zero issues with those on my koaloha.

agree w/ bazmaz

The Big Kahuna
09-13-2012, 07:28 PM
Less weight equals more sustain


I can't believe there would be any measurable difference in sustain... can there?

As far as I'm concerned, more weight = more sustain, but that only really applies to the body & neck of an instrument. Nut & bridge saddle material are going to have the greatest effect on sustain.

The Big Kahuna
09-13-2012, 07:30 PM
And another thing...the only place for plastic on an instrument is edge binding on a cheap Ukulele. Not tuning heads.

SailingUke
09-13-2012, 08:06 PM
I really don't understand the 4:1 ratio of pegheds.
Much lower than a nice geared tuner, but I find them extremly easy and precise.
I have 3 sets and am a very happy camper.

coolkayaker1
09-14-2012, 12:08 AM
You stole my mug.

wendellfiddler
09-14-2012, 07:43 AM
And another thing...the only place for plastic on an instrument is edge binding on a cheap Ukulele. Not tuning heads.

So that would include all the plastic buttons on 90% of every non-friction tuner ever made - unless they were real pearl, wood or metal?

or the "tortoise" binding on high end guitars and ukes going back 60 years or more?

dt

TheCraftedCow
09-15-2012, 06:47 AM
I can understand someone not being excited about the flat black buttons on the PEGHEDS prior to 1 Juneof this year. since then, the 7.5 and 8.5 have a grip with no flash on the edge and an ebony-like colour. Not all ebony is jet black. A trip through the tuners drawer turned up the plastic grips from a Ukiyo Vita;a Giannini baritone; and three sets of SGH318 Gotohs which have Black, White and Amber PLASTIC buttons. So much for the cheap ukuleles and cheap plastic buttons myth. Does the person who considers plastic as inappropriate use steel or genuine gut strings only, or perhaps we would find one of the most significant parts on hhis ukuleles are plastic??
A little work with 320 grit smooths edges;0000 steel wool over edges and faces make everything ready for buffing with a little toothpaste and a buffing wheel on a hand held moto-tool. So, if someone wants a buffed set without doing it , the "A" buttons now have an option of matte or gloss. Gloss is $8.00 more.

wendellfiddler
09-19-2012, 03:56 PM
I love my pegheds - but they do take a little getting used to and you have to learn to adjust the tension by pushing or pulling them in or out - gently.

The inventor of peghed tuners, Chuck Herin, will swap your plastic buttons for wood ones if you send him your uke (or go to the peghed facility in SC). More recent Collings ukes have the "improved" plastic pegs that look like ebony - earlier ones are more obviously plastic. But they all work the same.

Doug

An update - seeing the new "improved" peghead grips and not liking the unimproved version on my older Collings tenor, I decided to try improving my older pegheds myself - no problem. It took a lot of persistent, careful work with 320, 400, 600 and 1500 paper and I did with them in place because I didn't want to disassemble them (there being no directions on how to do that - seemed best to do it in place) - but they came out great - dead ringers for a simple ebony friction peg grip. The Collings uke is so light that it was pretty easy to move it around and support the peg ends while I worked on it - I did it incrementally over a couple of weeks.

dt

The Big Kahuna
09-19-2012, 07:30 PM
So that would include all the plastic buttons on 90% of every non-friction tuner ever made - unless they were real pearl, wood or metal?

or the "tortoise" binding on high end guitars and ukes going back 60 years or more?

dt

I'm not talking about the buttons on the tuner, I was referring to the barrels.

wendellfiddler
09-19-2012, 07:48 PM
I'm not talking about the buttons on the tuner, I was referring to the barrels.

hmm - I don't understand. You know of some tuners that have plastic mechanical or structural parts other than the buttons or "grips"? If you were thinking of Pegheds, I don't believe the internal parts are plastic and the sleave that the mechanism rides is definitely not plastic. Maybe on a toy where they have plastic friction pegs - I've seen that.

dt

TheCraftedCow
09-19-2012, 08:11 PM
Good for you! I am glad that you are pleased with how you have made an improvement to them.

TheCraftedCow
09-19-2012, 08:29 PM
Your source of information of the material used in making the product is not factual.
The only part of genuine PEGHEDS which is not steel or anodized aluminum with aluminum oxide coating is the button. The outer shaft which screws into the body of the ukulele, is aluminum. The center shaft and planetary gears are made of the same metal the the company uses for high quality Allen wrenches. Compared to violins of concert grade, the most expensive ukulele you can buy is less expensive by far than even a premium grade bow. PEGHEDS are on many concert grade iolins,violas and cellos.

coolkayaker1
09-20-2012, 01:02 AM
Your source of information of the material used in making the product is not factual.
The only part of genuine PEGHEDS which is not steel or anodized aluminum with aluminum oxide coating is the button. The outer shaft which screws into the body of the ukulele, is aluminum. The center shaft and planetary gears are made of the same metal the the company uses for high quality Allen wrenches. Compared to violins of concert grade, the most expensive ukulele you can buy is less expensive by far than even a premium grade bow. PEGHEDS are on many concert grade iolins,violas and cellos.

Any chance they'll make the aluminum shaft anything other than black? A brushed silver aluminum with the wooden buttons would be spectacular looking, Cow. Thoughts?

Bevelsnob
09-20-2012, 03:52 AM
Obviously there are many folks who love their peghed tuners! I have no problem with the plastic . If I did, I wouldn't buy a Collings in the first place. My concern is more with the precision of getting the string in tune....and not keeping it in tune, which doesn't seem to be a problem. Being new to the ukulele, maybe the problem is with the string material itself? As opposed to the tuner.

Having not used the Waverly uke tuners, I'm not sure they would be an improvement. Perhaps some of the luthiers who use them could comment? But even so, I doubt I could put the wavs on my Collings, as I don't think there's enough room on the peghed.

wendellfiddler
09-20-2012, 04:03 AM
I play violin as well and I'm fortunate to have a couple of decent bows that I purchased many years ago when I was young and they were more affordable - Each of them is insured for more than the cost of a new UTK2. Of course, that's one reason I love Ukes - if you're able to, you can obtain fantastic instruments at low cost when compared to relative quality in many other instruments. And like violins, you can carry them on airplanes without a hassle!

wendellfiddler
09-20-2012, 04:08 AM
Obviously there are many folks who love their peghed tuners! I have no problem with the plastic . If I did, I wouldn't buy a Collings in the first place. My concern is more with the precision of getting the string in tune....and not keeping it in tune, which doesn't seem to be a problem.

Having not used the Waverly uke tuners, I'm not sure they would be an improvement. Perhaps some of the luthiers who use them could comment? But even so, I doubt I could put the wavs on my Collings, as I don't think there's enough room on the peghed.

Maybe this has been said by others already, but I have a uke with traditional geared schaller type tuners, and another with friction tuners - neither of them are easier to tune than the ones with pegheds - the friction tuners I have on an old Martin work ok - they're in good shape - but are frustrating both in terms of getting and keeping in tune - the screw tension is really hard to get right.

dt

RichM
09-20-2012, 05:15 AM
My concern is more with the precision of getting the string in tune....and not keeping it in tune, which doesn't seem to be a problem. Being new to the ukulele, maybe the problem is with the string material itself? As opposed to the tuner.


If you're new to nylon strings, you will find that they continue to stretch considerably after installed, and constant tuning is pretty much a given for the first few days, regardless of your tuners.

That being said, I have seen a few people in this thread complain that Pegheds are imprecise. What definition of precision are we using? Planetary gear tuners like Pegheds generally use a 4:1 ratio, which means it takes 4 turns of the button to turn the peg once. That fairly precise. Guitar tuners tend to 16:1, which is extremely precise (although it requires a lot of turning). Friction pegs are 1:1, which means they tune up fast, but it's pretty much up to you to find the magic zone between dead on and a few cents sharp.

So I guess I don't get why people feel Pegheds (or any geared tuner for that matter) aren't precise. What am I not getting?

Dan Uke
09-20-2012, 06:04 AM
If you're new to nylon strings, you will find that they continue to stretch considerably after installed, and constant tuning is pretty much a given for the first few days, regardless of your tuners.

That being said, I have seen a few people in this thread complain that Pegheds are imprecise. What definition of precision are we using? Planetary gear tuners like Pegheds generally use a 4:1 ratio, which means it takes 4 turns of the button to turn the peg once. That fairly precise. Guitar tuners tend to 16:1, which is extremely precise (although it requires a lot of turning). Friction pegs are 1:1, which means they tune up fast, but it's pretty much up to you to find the magic zone between dead on and a few cents sharp.

So I guess I don't get why people feel Pegheds (or any geared tuner for that matter) aren't precise. What am I not getting?

Well said Rich. I said it before but even if you have it tuned perfectly, the amount of pressure and amount string bend that we exert when fingering a chord changes the pitch.

Secondly, most of the tuners we use are not that precise. I use a Snark tuner and I can turn the knob and it still says it tuned. After tuning with the Snark, I fine tune the strings with each other.

Anyways, I really like the newer version that is shorter. For non-slotted ukes, they are the tuners of choice for me.

Plainsong
09-20-2012, 08:16 AM
IMO there's not a huge difference between 4:1 and 1:1, if the friction tuners are good and track smoothly. I'm using a Peterson stroboclip, and it's at least as easy to dial in the frictions. The pegheads are handy if you don't want your tenor to have ears though.

wendellfiddler
09-20-2012, 10:50 AM
IMO there's not a huge difference between 4:1 and 1:1, if the friction tuners are good and track smoothly. I'm using a Peterson stroboclip, and it's at least as easy to dial in the frictions. The pegheads are handy if you don't want your tenor to have ears though.

Really? I think the original concept of the pegheds was to replace 1 to 1 violin tuners. I don't find 1 to 1 friction violin tuners easy to use at all (and mine are all set up professionally and work fine) - listen to any orchestra tuning up and you can hear how long it takes. Me, I use tailpiece fine tuners on my violins, but since I play jazz and folk music no one cares - Most people who play classical music seem to use the friction pegs alone (at least it seems so based on the way I see violins set up in the store). But when I'm at music camp where people have both systems I definitely find myself tuning faster than anyone using friction pegs. I don't even like the 1 to 1 friction tuners on my Martin Baritone - it really seems difficult to adjust when we're talking about a few cents, which if your really in tune is what is required.

doug

Plainsong
09-20-2012, 11:03 AM
I'm not sure what the ratio is on gotoh and the gotoh clone frictions, which both are what I have, and both are at least as easy. I don't know why, The pegheads hold the strings fine, but they're just not friendly to me. But they are light, and they are an option.

sukie
09-21-2012, 11:51 AM
Sorry you don't like them. I love them.

That's what great about the world -- something for everyone.

Plainsong
09-22-2012, 01:29 PM
Maybe it's a case of over-hype. On the one hand, they are a different system, they are light, they are a valid way to get longer scale ukes to go earless, and they do absolutely work.

On the other, maybe they're not the Best.Greatest.Only.Tuners.Evar either.

TheCraftedCow
09-22-2012, 08:55 PM
The shorter PEGHEDS are going to get a little shorter, and a couple of other changes. The designator AF will change, because the little cap (3mm) over the string spool will go away and the length will be 7mm just like the taller ones. They will be 48mm tip to tip. Buttons will come in a wide variety to include the new A version. There will be A1 and A2 . With any of the buttons, the left side holes will be .080 whilst the right side will be.0626.

If I knew how to import a picture, I would show all the new colour of shaft and button which are not yet ready to go up for sale. It will be chrome and a old fashioned "clover leaf shape".....very art deco in ivoroid.

The 16:1 steel guitar ratio is to offset the torque needed to pull steel strings up to tension. A cheap $2.50 string winder is a big help with new strings.