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View Full Version : Jumping Flea Arpeggiator: Gradus ad Parnassum for the High G Ukulele



Gary Jugert
09-28-2012, 05:42 AM
I just finished a new book last night and I want you guys to have it. It's a compilation of 30 arpeggios in all of the keys for ukulele. I hope it will be a decent contribution to increasing the amount of intermediate-to-advanced literature for our ukulele repertoire.

The book itself is here:

http://mammothgardens.com/arpeggiator/pdf/JumpingFleaArpeggiator1stEdition.pdf

Print it out two-sided and put it in a binder.

The sound files for each song are here:

http://www.mammothgardens.com/arpeggiator/

Let me know what you think.

sillymonky
09-28-2012, 01:24 PM
Wow - I was just trying to figure out some basic music theory and was thinking how I really wanted to learn all the chords in certain keys. Thank you so much - your timing is totally perfect. This is so generous :)

itsme
09-28-2012, 10:41 PM
Wow is right! Gary, this is awesome, really awesome. I've only played thru a few pages so far, but these are excellent exercises for fingerpicking and learning theory and what chords go in a key.

Really impressive work and thank you so much! :)

beardco
09-29-2012, 02:21 AM
That's extremely generous of you. Much thanks.

janeray1940
09-29-2012, 07:12 AM
Gary, this is fantastic - thank you. Lately I've been trying to learn minor keys and this is going to make things a lot easier for me!

Lalz
09-29-2012, 08:21 AM
Amazing! You don't know how long I've been looking for something like this. THANK YOU!!!

pootsie
09-29-2012, 10:46 AM
Thank you for sharing your hard work on this. I look forward to using this in my journey!

sillymonky
10-01-2012, 08:19 AM
I just printed the booklet and realized that you're also the person who created the circle of fifths template I already have at the front of my uke binder. I wanted to thank you for that too - it's so clear and so detailed, I'm a noob (especially when it comes to theory), and that little document has totally changed my musical life! Thanks so much!

Loz
10-01-2012, 08:30 AM
This is incredibly generous - thank you!

Newportlocal
10-09-2012, 12:16 PM
Really great! Thank you so...much!

Roselynne
10-11-2012, 06:50 AM
Wow ... I really needed this. Many thanks!

Olarte
10-16-2012, 04:41 PM
Wow what a great collection of beautiful Etudes.

As a classical guitarist, I can tell you these are right up there with Sor and Gulliani...


Great stuff. Thank you so much for sharing this. :bowdown:

Both the scores and the sound files are marvelous! :shaka:

14twelve
10-16-2012, 05:41 PM
Thank you so much for sharing this! What great exercises for fingerpicking. I'm guilty of sticking pretty much with C and G, so this is going to be wonderful practice for other keys. Thanks again! :)

Gary Jugert
10-17-2012, 06:18 AM
Hi everyone. Thank you so much for the warm compliments. I really do hope the Jumping Flea Arpeggiator will be a helpful tool for anyone who wants to become a more accomplished musician. Please make sure your ukulele maddened friends have a copy of the pdf file. I have a dream that this file is on every ukulele player's hard drive ... waiting for the time when they just need an arpeggio to make it through the day. :)

VaGoddess
10-25-2012, 03:55 AM
I just finished a new book last night and I want you guys to have it. It's a compilation of 30 arpeggios in all of the keys for ukulele. I hope it will be a decent contribution to increasing the amount of intermediate-to-advanced literature for our ukulele repertoire.

The book itself is here:

http://mammothgardens.com/arpeggiator/pdf/JumpingFleaArpeggiator1stEdition.pdf

Print it out two-sided and put it in a binder.

The sound files for each song are here:

http://www.mammothgardens.com/arpeggiator/

Let me know what you think.


I'll definitely be printing this out! Thanks a lot!

Ondrej
10-29-2012, 10:40 PM
Great work Gary

MisterRios
10-29-2012, 11:14 PM
I just started on these yesterday, and they are awesome. Thanks so much.

Gänzo
10-30-2012, 06:04 AM
It is said that the greatest joy in learning, is found in the sharing of knowledge.

Much obliged good sir.

Louis0815
12-04-2012, 03:15 AM
Just found some remarks/corrections in the german Ukulelenclub Forum (http://www.ukulelenclub.de/Forum/UseBB/topic.php?id=13686) which I would like to share for further discussion/consideration:

Great stuff, but the closed minor chords are not always correct, e.g. Gm (first mentioned in Key of D minor on p. 8) is listed as 5765 which sounds a bit strange. Should rather be 0765, 7765 or 3765.
Similar problem with F#m (Key of A on p. 26): listed as 4654, should be 6654 (or eventually 2124).

Apart from that, excellent training for both hands and easy to learn with the included MP3s.

Cornfield
12-04-2012, 03:38 AM
This is very nice. Any chance of doing a version with low G?

Gary Jugert
12-06-2012, 01:45 PM
Just found some remarks/corrections in the german Ukulelenclub Forum (http://www.ukulelenclub.de/Forum/UseBB/topic.php?id=13686) which I would like to share for further discussion/consideration:

Great stuff, but the closed minor chords are not always correct, e.g. Gm (first mentioned in Key of D minor on p. 8) is listed as 5765 which sounds a bit strange. Should rather be 0765, 7765 or 3765.
Similar problem with F#m (Key of A on p. 26): listed as 4654, should be 6654 (or eventually 2124).


I read those comments on the German forum a few weeks ago and planned to say nothing about them since they are (on the surface) correct ... however, since it's been brought up here too, I will respond. The notion that the chords are "not always correct" isn't musically motivated and leads to a false conclusion.

There are several minor-chord forms that I've simplified the spelling of the chord because it helps in understanding the role of the chord and the proper left hand shape to accomplish the arpeggio. My goal wasn't to create a scavenger hunt for ways to describe chord alterations, but rather to find acceptable left hand shapes that would produce the correct melody.

In the example quoted: I list 5765 as G minor. It functions as a G minor and it allows the proper notes in the melody to be produced without a complicated dance of the left hand.

Unfortunately, chord gurus, who seem to spend too much time looking at chords on paper rather than making music with them, would probably prefer that I would have named the chord one of the following: Bb6/9 or C7sus2 or most likely Gmsus4. While I would have earned points for adding complicated detail to the name of the chord, it wouldn't have changed what was intended in the melody or the best way to accomplish it in the left hand. The "strange" sound isn't an accident -- it's not strange at all -- it's what the melody requires. The suspended tone on the 4th string lays out nicely on the fretboard when fingered as described. The writer said it should be 0765 or 3765 ... which makes the name of the chord correct, but doesn't lay out conveniently when playing the melody at speed. The second chord listed by the writer has exactly the same "correctness" without being musically appropriate.

In a similar vein, I will point out that in a number of the tunes I use the chord "A minor" and use the fingering 0453. The correct name for this chord is probably Amflat7 depending on which mode of minor scale your brain is working in, but again, giving an unnecessarily descriptive name to the chord doesn't create any better music. It would have looked extra smart on paper, but it wouldn't have changed the altered A minor arpeggio required by the tune.

In summation, I don't quibble with the writer's conclusion, it is correct as far as it goes, and if you're in the business of memorizing chord shapes, you'd be better off looking at chord charts than playing music. With every note, it's possible to re-name the resultant chord, and that is fascinating stuff when you've decided to treat music academically rather than play it. But from a musician's standpoint, I think it is much more useful to follow the melody and accept the resultant chord alterations as part of the musical fabric. The chords create a framework, but melody makes the music.

On an unrelated note from a comment from MrEWorm, I will probably be doing a baritone series before I do any Low-G work. However, if you don't mind having the melody sound a little different than intended, you can play the tablature as written using a Low-G ukulele and it will produce a cool variation on the theme.

Barbablanca
12-06-2012, 03:13 PM
Thanks to the Push you gave this thread I have discovered it. Missed it first time around.... This is a very busy forum!!!

Anyway, I've downloaded it and when I get a moment I will explore it. Thanks!

23skidoo
12-07-2012, 03:25 AM
missed this the first time as well..... very glad to have found it! What a wonderful resource - thanks very much for your generosity. I've been working on teaching myself to sight read with guitar and ukulele and this will be invaluable.

HeWhoTalksLoudSayinNothin
01-13-2013, 04:27 AM
I am going to push this once again with a further question. While practising with it I got a bit confused if you are supposed to leave your left hand on the last chord mentioned or if there are parts where you don't use the chords mentioned before for the fingerpicking. I'll give an example as I am sure that sounds very confusing: In the first parts of the C Major sheet, you make a C chord, fingerpick while C chord is still held, then you switch to G chord, and fingerpick that, and it makes sense as the numbers match up with the frets.
Now on the next page of the C Major sheets (page 2) it starts again with a C chord, but the fingerpicking then includes a note not present in the C chord, 5th fret of the A string instead of 3rd fret. Same for the F chord that comes little bit after that, first you play the F chord but in between there is a pick for E string 3rd fret, which is not in the chord.
So my question again is, do I keep the chord shapes of the left hand at all times and fret these additional notes with free fingers or do I just fret away as needed?

Not a hugely important question, I know basically everyone can do this as they please, I was just wondering if the creator of these had something in mind with that :)

Gary Jugert
01-15-2013, 05:12 AM
Hi HeWhoTalksLoudSayinNothin ... hilarious handle by the way ... Thanks for giving the arpeggiator a try. You have already reached the correct conclusion, namely, play them as you please. However, I will tell you that my goal was to encourage players to think of melody outside of the chords. Through the first half of the piece, a player can grab their chord and successfully accomplish the melody, but in the second half of the song, I've added a variation into the melody which requires modification of the chord. This makes the melody more interesting and the music more challenging.

In your first example, reaching to the fifth fret, the motion should be do-able while holding your original chord. In the second example, it may be easier to release the chord entirely (however I play the G note with my pinkie and continue to hold the chord). Generally speaking in "finger style" playing, doing the least amount of movement is preferable, so if you can add a finger rather than removing one, you'll be more successful. That being said, there are places further into my book (and everywhere in music) where you'll have to completely abandon the chord to accomplish the melody.

I'm also very happy you've discovered notes that aren't in the chord. One of the problems with approaching music with a chord-first mentality is that we want all of the notes in the melody to be in the chord. Fortunately, music is much more complicated than that and adding non-chordal notes is where things become interesting. Chopin was a master of adding notes that didn't even belong in the same key! Jazz musicians are also wonderful at finding unusual notes outside of the chord to mix into the harmony.

Thanks again to everyone for your thoughtful comments and questions about this book.

HeWhoTalksLoudSayinNothin
01-15-2013, 08:20 AM
Hey Gary, thanks for taking your time to reply so thoroughly! Still a lot to learn for me then, which is good, one should never stop learning new things or life gets boring ;)