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View Full Version : Uke Building Environment Ref. Humidity, Temperature, Relative Humidity?



Uke Whisperer
10-01-2012, 08:51 AM
Is there a "standard" that Luthiers use as far as humidity and temperature of their building shop and wood storage? Wouldn't the best environment for storing ones Uke be the same as the environment when and where it was built? Would relative humidity be the key factor or would actual humidity and temperature be required? Just wondering. Seems that a Uke built in very low humidity would best be kept in very low humidity and one built in very high humidity would best be kept in very high humidity.

Uke Whisperer
10-03-2012, 02:11 AM
I guess that means the answer is "no", or that it is a stupid question. I'll just consider it the latter.

No, I'll consider it as "no" and now ask "why is 40 to 45% seem to be the most recommended range for relative humidity for uke storage?

If mine are stored at 40% and one cracks, I'll assume that it was glued and clamped in a more humid environment.......

Sorry, I just wonder about these type of things....

Gmoney
10-03-2012, 02:52 AM
There's been lots of threads, but the search function is somewhat "results-impaired" - so, using your favorite search engine, use a search similar to:

http://www.bing.com/search?q=humidity+building+relative+site%3Aukulele underground.com&qs=n&form=QBLH&pq=humidity+building+relative+site%3Aukuleleunderg round.com&sc=0-13&sp=-1&sk=

Which finds a few appropriate threads... here's one:

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?68830-Building-for-a-dry-climate

Mahalo!

Uke Whisperer
10-03-2012, 07:59 AM
Thanks Gmoney.

I had not seen the UU post that was pretty much the same topic. I found it very enlightening that some "experts" shared their thoughts on the subject.

I guess that the HVAC companies pushing the relatively new systems with programmable relative humidity control can not only save one money in the long run's actual heating and air conditioning costs, but also in Uke repair/replacement costs. Perhaps luthiers would be an expansion market for them. I think it would be a good thing to see luthiers advertise that all their instruments were constructed in a 70 degree, 40% relative humidity environment or in the case of "top of the line" custom Ukes, having an option to allow the customer to specify their desired construction environment to best match their needs. Okay, I going too far, I'll "hush-up" now.



There's been lots of threads, but the search function is somewhat "results-impaired" - so, using your favorite search engine, use a search similar to:

http://www.bing.com/search?q=humidity+building+relative+site%3Aukulele underground.com&qs=n&form=QBLH&pq=humidity+building+relative+site%3Aukuleleunderg round.com&sc=0-13&sp=-1&sk=

Which finds a few appropriate threads... here's one:

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?68830-Building-for-a-dry-climate

Mahalo!

PedalFreak
10-03-2012, 10:57 AM
I know Taylor Guitars, and Gibson Acoustic Factories have a pretty intense Temperature and Humidity system. Both keep there factories around 70 degrees and 45% humidity. Relative humidity is based on temp and humidity. So when you hear that an instrument should be 45% Relative Humidity, that is usually based on 70 degrees. If the temp goes up the humidity should go down, if the temp goes down the humidity would go up. I've had my humidity as high as 70-75% in some dry midwest winters. You can get some hygrometers that will calculate the relative humidity also.