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Rollie
10-07-2012, 10:37 PM
Hi guys I just got my soprano uke recently, though when I am practicing I cannot do the F chord. When my index finger land on the G thread, it always touches the C thread. I tried to land my finger on it more vertically to the board, but still...

Is there a way to solve the problem? or I might need a concert uke?

Thanks

strumsilly
10-07-2012, 10:49 PM
the way t solve the problem is called practice. you have to teach you fingers the right place to be and then get out of the way. it will become automatic, and when that happens, and it will with enough practice, a large smile will come unbidden to your face.
and welcome to the wonderful world of UU

coolkayaker1
10-08-2012, 12:51 AM
Practice will make it come more easily.

And then you can buy a concert uke like we all do.

consitter
10-08-2012, 12:53 AM
Practice will make it come more easily.

And then you can buy a concert uke like we all do.

Or something with a tenor neck to make it even easier.

coolkayaker1
10-08-2012, 12:56 AM
Or something with a tenor neck to make it even easier.

And then something with a baritone neck to make it harder once again.

Pukulele Pete
10-08-2012, 01:06 AM
All it takes is practice. You dont need a larger uke. Anything larger than a soprano is cheating.

ukeshale
10-08-2012, 01:18 AM
Welcome to UU, Rollie. I don't know if you meant to say "index finger on the G thread" but if you did then try index finger on the E string and your middle finger on the G string. Putting your index on the G may be your problem. Good luck. Practise makes perfect.

cantsing
10-08-2012, 03:46 AM
Try index finger on the E string and your middle finger on the G string.
Also, be sure to arch your fingers so that you are touching the strings with the very tip of your finger, not the pad. This is hard to do if your wrist is tucked under the neck; let your wrist drop away from the neck.

chiefnoda
10-08-2012, 04:41 AM
I cannot do the F chord. When my index finger land on the G thread, it always touches the C thread.

Hello Rollie

What fingering are you using for the F chord? Your description sounds very strange (to me). The easiest form of the F chord is to play 2 0 1 0 (ie, 2nd fret on G string = closest to your nose); open on C string; fret 1st on E string; open on A string (closest to your toe). And you use the *middle* finger on the G string and index finger on E string, while you mentioned using index finger on G??? That puzzles me deeply and beyond.

Practice really helps, but some pointers should help. You are right about getting the fretting fingers perpendicular to the fretboard. At the same time, make sure that your ukulele is *not* tilted. A beginner's tendency is to rotate the ukulele toward your face so you can see the fretboard. It makes to very difficult to plant your fingers without touching adjacent strings. Watch some videos on YouTube and see how people are holding ukuleles.

And make sure your ukulele is set up nicely. High action makes fretting darn hard.

Do you have a big hand? If so, it might help to get a tenor or a concert. Try some at your local stores?

Have fun
Chief

coolkayaker1
10-08-2012, 04:47 AM
I found that, as a newer player, if I am tilting the neck backwards (skywards) to allow me to see what I am fretting, it makes it particularly hard to fret anything on the 4th or 3rd strings.

gyosh
10-08-2012, 04:53 AM
One last piece of advice. I have pudgy hands and when I play a soprano I have to make sure I have good technique with my left hand. Make sure the pad of your thumb is placed properly on the neck (middle-ish of the neck), it allows your fingers to move much more freely.

Uncle Rod Higuchi
10-08-2012, 04:57 AM
Also, besides placing your middle finger on the G-string, second fret, please place your thumb behind the second fret so that it is NOT visible from the front of the ukulele. Some players try to play and form chords with the neck of their ukes cradled in the web of their palm instead of placing their thumbs in the middle of the back of the neck behind fret 2 (generally). There should be quite a bit of space between the web of your palm and the neck of the uke :) (NOTE: 'should' as in 'you may find it helpful' vs 'must':) )

keep uke'in',

OldePhart
10-08-2012, 07:15 AM
Welcome to UU, Rollie. I don't know if you meant to say "index finger on the G thread" but if you did then try index finger on the E string and your middle finger on the G string. Putting your index on the G may be your problem. Good luck. Practise makes perfect.

Good eye...

Wow...I just tried fingering it the other way 'round and that is tough!

John

Rollie
10-08-2012, 05:24 PM
First I want to say thanks for the replies and suggestions!
Second I want to also thank the few friends here saw my typo, yes I meant middle finger on G (I need to carefully check this sentence). As a very beginner I understand I am going to have a lot of practice and hard times on it, but I am willing to try. Thanks again for the help, and sure I will be posting here if I face trouble again!:o

itsme
10-08-2012, 06:22 PM
...please place your thumb behind the second fret so that it is NOT visible from the front of the ukulele. Some players try to play and form chords with the neck of their ukes cradled in the web of their palm instead of placing their thumbs in the middle of the back of the neck behind fret 2 (generally). There should be quite a bit of space between the web of your palm and the neck of the uke :) (NOTE: 'should' as in 'you may find it helpful' vs 'must':) )
Classical guitar players keep their LH thumb behind the middle of the neck, acoustic/electric players are often known to do otherwise, who am I to argue with what works for them. But I do agree you get better range/ease of movement for your other fretting fingers if you do it the "proper" way.

marpole
04-24-2018, 06:04 AM
I am a beginner ukulele player, and initially learned the F chord in the usual manner (index finger on 1st fret on E string, and middle finger on 2nd fret on G string, but I find that awkward on my wrist to make and awkward in terms of transition to/from other chords, and have been finding that the converse (middle finger on 1st fret on E string, and index finger on 2nd fret on G string is easier for me (despite my hot dog fingers) and less likely for me to create string interference on the C string.

Am I asking for trouble down the road if I keep on with my variant manner of playing F, and would it be preferable to keep pushing ahead with the usual manner of playing?

Thanks for any thoughts.

ErnieElse
04-24-2018, 06:11 AM
FWIW I think you should definitely keep practicing the standard fingering and it will come.

ripock
04-24-2018, 11:01 AM
I am a beginner ukulele player, and initially learned the F chord in the usual manner (index finger on 1st fret on E string, and middle finger on 2nd fret on G string, but I find that awkward on my wrist to make and awkward in terms of transition to/from other chords, and have been finding that the converse (middle finger on 1st fret on E string, and index finger on 2nd fret on G string is easier for me (despite my hot dog fingers) and less likely for me to create string interference on the C string.

Am I asking for trouble down the road if I keep on with my variant manner of playing F, and would it be preferable to keep pushing ahead with the usual manner of playing?

Thanks for any thoughts.

I could write a treatise on all the stupid little stop-gap tricks in which I engaged while trying to learn E maj or Bb maj. Ultimately I abandoned them and they were nothing more than wasted time. I would suggest going back to the standard fingering, or try using your middle and ring finger (which will leave your index free for barre chords). To my way of thinking, the real problem is your arm. At least in my experience, whenever I had your issue, it was due to the arm. I had (have) a tendency to keep the arm immobile from the shoulder to the wrist. That means the hand itself has to do all the acrobatics. However, if you move your entire arm, then you can put your wrist in a more favorable position. Try moving your elbow around and see if you cannot find a better starting position for your wrist.

kitsunegarcia
04-24-2018, 12:20 PM
And then something with a baritone neck to make it harder once again.

Baritones are sometimes easier than tenors depending on music background and hand size! :D

Louis0815
04-28-2018, 09:19 AM
To my way of thinking, the real problem is your arm.
Not only the arm, it's usually the general posture and way of holding the uke.

My way of doing it: hold the uke up high (male players have some advantages here), hold it with the crouch of your right elbow and forearm against your chest - a bit like a baby. Point the neck upwards and have the headstock approximately on shoulder height. It should have a rather stable position even without using your left hand. Now bend your left elbow and put your left thumb behind the neck (middle-ish) and your fingers have lots of freedom to wander around the fretboard. Try not to turn the fretboard towards you for better visibility - sooner or later you won't need that anyway so better not start that habit at all.

Strumming is mostly a movement of the wrist, you hardly need your forearm for that - and the "best" strumming position is not over the soundhole but more where the neck is attached to the body (~12th fret)

Don't
- rest the uke on your lap like a guitar (use a strap when necessary)
- strangle the neck with your fretting hand
- press too hard on the strings, be gentle and press only as hard as necessary
- forget to have fun

YMMV

WaylonUkulele
05-04-2018, 04:09 AM
F Chord is pretty easy and one of the first ones I learned. Just take your time and keep practicing. It will come. I found, with muscle memory (and science supports this) that if you just do 20 minutes day, in a week you'll be a lot better than if you practice a lot in one day. Or just do 2 sessions over a week that are 3 hours long. Just be patient. It will come. We all had to start from nothing.

Boomershakalaka
05-09-2018, 02:39 AM
All it takes is practice. You dont need a larger uke. Anything larger than a soprano is cheating.

I don't follow you're comment. When you say "Anything larger than a soprano is cheating", do you mean those who prefer a concert and above are not true ukulele players? If that's your contention, I think you're mistaken. If not, please expound.

Pirate Jim
05-09-2018, 07:05 AM
I don't follow you're comment. When you say "Anything larger than a soprano is cheating", do you mean those who prefer a concert and above are not true ukulele players? If that's your contention, I think you're mistaken. If not, please expound.

Dude, Pete wrote that in 2012. I doubt he's going to get drawn into an argument over a throwaway comment he made on an internet forum six years ago.

Creb
05-26-2018, 10:54 AM
All it takes is practice. You dont need a larger uke. Anything larger than a soprano is cheating.

As somewhat of a soprano purist myself (I like the challenge, but more importantly I prefer the sound), I find this comment to be hilarious and somewhat tongue-in-cheek. OF COURSE the other sizes are also ukuleles. BUT, because some people trend to a larger size because they are apparently easier to play, the word cheating gets tossed around. I find it all in good fun with.. just a hair of truth. :)

Rllink
05-26-2018, 11:51 AM
As somewhat of a soprano purist myself (I like the challenge, but more importantly I prefer the sound), I find this comment to be hilarious and somewhat tongue-in-cheek. OF COURSE the other sizes are also ukuleles. BUT, because some people trend to a larger size because they are apparently easier to play, the word cheating gets tossed around. I find it all in good fun with.. just a hair of truth. :)Not always. It just depends on what your are doing. When I am playing chords where I have to stretch my fingers out there to hit all of the notes, I've found the soprano scale is a bit easier to reach them. I'm most definitely not a purist though. I'll play anything. Except maybe a baritone.

Creb
05-26-2018, 12:00 PM
Not always. It just depends on what your are doing. When I am playing chords where I have to stretch my fingers out there to hit all of the notes, I've found the soprano scale is a bit easier to reach them. I'm most definitely not a purist though. I'll play anything. Except maybe a baritone.
Good point on the stretchy chords sometimes being easier on the soprano. I find some barring on the soprano easier as well- like barring the G and C string with one finger while doing an E chord.