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Romanista77
10-08-2012, 07:17 AM
Hi Everyone,

I'm looking for some advice.
I'm a minimalist. Generally the less I have the happier I am. I'm often looking for ways to simplify my life.

During the summer I picked up a Koaloha Koa Soprano that I love. It's been my go to uke ever since. Now I'm seriously considering selling my Pono Mahogany Tenor.

I'm wondering if I'll regret not having the Tenor later on. I'm a average intermediate player and don't do much fancy playing at the moment, but I hope to get there.
I play everything from folk, Rock, and Classical.

Will I miss out only having 12 frets?

I have small hands and so far the Soprano has been easier to play.

The Tenor I have has a passive pickup and the Soprano doesn't. Not something I've ever used yet.


I'd love to hear your thoughts/suggestions!

luluwrites
10-08-2012, 07:19 AM
If it makes you happier to have one, have one. You can get a new tenor if/when your situation demands.

Mandarb
10-08-2012, 07:25 AM
You have a tenor which I assume you have played. When you play your soprano do you miss those extra frets? - it is not for us decide if you will miss them. It is personal preference - go with whatever will make you happy.

connor013
10-08-2012, 07:36 AM
With the caveat that this is obviously subjective, I say sell the tenor. Here's my reasoning:

1. Love the uke you play, and play it until it's sawdust. (This is part of the play-more-shop/covet-less theory.)
2. You can always buy another (or the same!) tenor, should your tastes change in time.
3. While the data is still being compiled, recent analysis suggests that the sole reason the economy hasn't floundered is because we, the good people of UU, keep buying, selling and trading ukuleles. It is therefore your civic obligation to adios the Pono.

In the interest of full disclosure: I own four ukes, three of which I play regularly. I have promised my wife I'll sell off at least one of them, but fortunately (thankfully!) the camera is out of batteries.

Good luck with your decision -- the marketplace greedily awaits it.

Roselynne
10-08-2012, 09:32 AM
Tough, deeply personal question.

Depending on your needs, your ukes could be seen as duplicates, or as two completely different instruments. Have your goals changed? Is the tenor too hard to play? Or, is it just a bit more challenging than the KoAloha? If one or both of the first two questions are "Yes," then maybe it's time for the tenor to move on.

Have you played the tenor recently, while you're trying to decide on selling it? The newer kid usually gets more play, at least at first (that's how it goes at my place, anyway). A planned "date" or two with the tenor might swing the decision either way.

peaceweaver3
10-08-2012, 09:48 AM
If it makes you happier to have one, have one. You can get a new tenor if/when your situation demands.
Agreed. Don't worry now about what you may/may not regret later... Worry takes the enjoyment out of the uke, whether you have one or many.

Newportlocal
10-08-2012, 10:03 AM
Good advice here. Play it today and if you still feel like selling it. Sell it. On a gut level do what makes you happy.

janeray1940
10-08-2012, 10:28 AM
Minimalist here too (although I have more than one uke, there is one that gets played 99% of the time). I've never once regretted selling a uke - if your instinct is telling you to sell it, it's time.

coolkayaker1
10-08-2012, 10:39 AM
I'd say to keep the Pono tenor. There's no reason or rationale to it. Your hands aren't likely to grow, your desire to play a tenor is not likely to change, and you probably aren't starved for cash or you'd not have bought it in the first place.

So, for reasons that are just as unclear to me as they are to you, I suggest you keep it.

Garydavkra
10-08-2012, 11:19 AM
I say keep the Pono as a spare. You never know when you might run over the new one laying in the driveway...or something.:D

strumsilly
10-08-2012, 11:26 AM
sell it to me really cheap. I don't have a Pono tenor, only a Pono baritone. now don't you feel sorry for me.haha . my advice[ which of course I don't follow myself] is if you don't play it , sell it and let someone else play it. most were not designed for being wall art.

OldePhart
10-08-2012, 11:59 AM
sell it to me really cheap. I don't have a Pono tenor, only a Pono baritone. now don't you feel sorry for me.haha . my advice[ which of course I don't follow myself] is if you don't play it , sell it and let someone else play it. most were not designed for being wall art.

That's what I love about this place...there are so many willing to sacrifice for the good of others... LOL

John

ScooterD35
10-08-2012, 01:29 PM
If you need the money, sell the Pono. If money's not an issue for you, find a friend that you trust and that is interested in learning and give them the Pono on "extended loan" with the understanding that you might want it back some day. (Or if they get really good and buy their own Koaloha you can then pass the Pono on to a new beginner.)


Scooter

OldePhart
10-08-2012, 02:13 PM
If you need the money, sell the Pono. If money's not an issue for you, find a friend that you trust and that is interested in learning and give them the Pono on "extended loan" with the understanding that you might want it back some day. (Or if they get really good and buy their own Koaloha you can then pass the Pono on to a new beginner.)


Scooter

Hi, I thought it was time I should introduce myself to the forum a little more formally. My name is Afriend That Youtrust and I'm interested in learning to play the ukulele... :)

John

joekulele
10-08-2012, 05:26 PM
It sounds like having two ukuleles is causing conflict with your minimalist lifestyle. If so, I'd say keep the soprano, sell the Pono and be happy!
-joe

Linho
10-08-2012, 09:51 PM
If you don't play it and don't want to keep it anymore, sell it. :)

I'm a minimalist, too: I only want one uke of each size. Except Bariton that I don't like.

(Right now I own 5. With my purchase of a K brand Tenor next year my ukulele acquisition mission is completed.)

bazmaz
10-08-2012, 09:55 PM
Very personal question, but a few things to consider.

I own MANY ukes, but that's mainly because I write about them. How many do I play regularly? Three - one in each body size (exc baritone). I like the different tones they give and the extra space on the tenor. If I was forced to ditch one it would be the concert as they always seem neither one thing or the other to me. There is easy enough difference between tenor and soprano for me to justify / want to play both.

One other thing though. Do you play gigs or shows (and do you plan to do so?) - I would never go to a gig without a spare on hand. A string change mid set is the biggest pain!

Barbablanca
10-08-2012, 11:51 PM
.... recent analysis suggests that the sole reason the economy hasn't floundered is because we, the good people of UU, keep buying, selling and trading ukuleles.

I'll have to try that argument with my other half :rolleyes:

I generally think that if you aren't going to get more than what you paid for an instrument (or at least the same amount) then what is the point of selling it? You lose the potential of that other sound and only in exchange for a few dollars. However, if you live in a bedsit (single room apartment) and space is of premium, then there is an argument for getting rid of it. Or if you really take the Leonard Cohen principle to heart:

"I choose the room that I live in with care,
There's only one bed and there's only one chair.
Only one Uke that I play when you're not there"

OK... I made that last line up :cool:

Skinny Money McGee
10-09-2012, 02:23 AM
Hi Everyone,

I'm looking for some advice.
I'm a minimalist. Generally the less I have the happier I am. I'm often looking for ways to simplify my life.

During the summer I picked up a Koaloha Koa Soprano that I love. It's been my go to uke ever since. Now I'm seriously considering selling my Pono Mahogany Tenor.

I'm wondering if I'll regret not having the Tenor later on. I'm a average intermediate player and don't do much fancy playing at the moment, but I hope to get there.
I play everything from folk, Rock, and Classical.

Will I miss out only having 12 frets?

I have small hands and so far the Soprano has been easier to play.

The Tenor I have has a passive pickup and the Soprano doesn't. Not something I've ever used yet.


I'd love to hear your thoughts/suggestions!


I'm a minimalist too. How much for the Pono

kissing
10-09-2012, 03:40 AM
I'm a minimalist with 12 ukes, 4 bass guitars, 2 tenor guitars, 20 ocarinas and 6 amplifiers.

I am a minimalist, therefore I must have only one uke. It simply doesn't work that way.
It's more like, have a handful of ukes (eg: 12) that you will genuinely play out of the billions available out there.

In my opinion, you will miss your tenor.
From one minimalist to another, I would keep it :)
You ARE being extremely minimalist already by having two ukes, one soprano and a tenor. A perfect combination that covers both sides.
There are different pros and cons to sopranos and tenors. They complement each other perfectly as a minimalist duo of ukes.

cantsing
10-09-2012, 07:53 AM
I would describe myself as a minimalist too. I started out my ukulele adventure with a tenor size laminate (Kala), and when I decided to move up a level, I chose a concert size mahogany (Mainland). I found the smaller scale much easier for my small hands. I was sure I would never play the tenor again and I have been half-heartedly seeking a new home for it. Recently, however, after almost a year away, I pulled out the tenor. To my surprise I discovered that I am now much more comfortable with the longer scale. I sometimes think about investing in a nicer ukulele, and I was absolutely convinced I would want a concert size, but now, honestly, I'm not so sure.

Anyway, I guess that's my way of saying that you might want to hang on to your Pono. Your thinking might change over time.

Romanista77
10-10-2012, 05:26 AM
Hello Everyone,

Thanks for all the great posts!
There's some good and varied insight here and I really appreciate the input.

For the last couple of days I've been playing the Tenor. I definitely prefer the lightness and smaller neck of the soprano. Makes me wonder how I ever used to manage a guitar...
Something I have noticed is that my particular Soprano only has 12 frets and some of the classical pieces I'd like to learn go as high as the 15th fret.

One poster asked if money was an issue. And it definitely is. I think what I may do is sell both ukes and put the funds towards a dream soprano with at least 15 frets.

coolkayaker1
10-10-2012, 05:38 AM
I think what I may do is sell both ukes and put the funds towards a dream soprano with at least 15 frets.

aka a concert

OldePhart
10-10-2012, 06:56 AM
aka a concert

Eh? 15-fret sopranos with the standard 13" soprano scale are pretty common... My Mainlands, for instance, have 15 frets (12 to the body). I'm not sure how useful they are for someone with my sausage fingers, but they're there... LOL

(And let's not forget Janeray's 19-fret custom soprano...) :)

John

janeray1940
10-10-2012, 09:14 AM
Eh? 15-fret sopranos with the standard 13" soprano scale are pretty common... My Mainlands, for instance, have 15 frets (12 to the body). I'm not sure how useful they are for someone with my sausage fingers, but they're there... LOL

(And let's not forget Janeray's 19-fret custom soprano...) :)

John

Eh? was my reaction too. 15- and 16-fret sopranos are pretty easy to find; even 17-fret ones are out there. If looking for a "dream" soprano then Kamaka and Kiwaya are where I would start; maybe LoPrinzi as well.

Beyond the 15th fret though, in my experience intonation starts to become an issue with factory ukes, so a good set-up is pretty critical if you're playing that high up the neck.