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Tailgate
10-10-2012, 02:00 AM
Are there any other natural leftys who play righty? I'm left handed and write, eat, throw the ball, etc left handed. In learning guitar as a kid, my teacher taught me to play right handed. So today I play the frets with my left and strum/pick with right. I have no trouble with my chords and notes, but have very little rhythm ability with my right hand.

Anyone else with similar affliction?

If you're right handed did you have more trouble playing the frets with your left and an easier time with the right hand strumming/picking?

Just curious... :confused:

BigSkyUkuleleGirl
10-10-2012, 02:23 AM
I am a lefty that plays righty - my childhood instructor thought it was better as my stronger hand was the one fretting and had more dexterity.

Play golf righty as well, my left side is the stronger one pulling thru the shot. Phil Mickelson is a righty that plays golf lefty. Of course, back in my day left handed guitars/golf clubs were not as widely available as they are today.

I saw a guy who plays the guitar left handed but strung right handed. Us leftys understand when he says he didn't know you could restring so he just learned to play a standard guitar. I think of that every time I use a ladle - the little point for pouring is always on the wrong side...;)

FiL
10-10-2012, 02:28 AM
I'm another lefty that plays righty. I have no idea of that hurts or helps me, but I noticed that anytime I'm inclined to play "air guitar", I play lefty.

I have a lefty friend who plays right-handed guitars upside-down. I never know what he's doing, but he gets great sounds.

- FiL

Pukulele Pete
10-10-2012, 02:32 AM
I'm a Lefty who plays guitar and uke correct handed. (right handed). This left/right playing stirs up alot of comments. I think playing correct handed ( right handed) is the way to go. Just because a uke or guitar can be set up non standard doesnt mean that is the right way for leftys. If that were true you would see left handed pianos,accordians, saxophones,etc. It is just easier to convert a standard string instrument than these other instruments. Leftys assume they need to play the non standard way. I think it all comes down to practice.Practice practice practice.

BigSkyUkuleleGirl
10-10-2012, 02:37 AM
Agree with PP - also, violinists learn to play in the standard position. I actually always thought that the way I played guitar/uke WAS the left handed way - I wonder who decided to flip the guitar over and restring? Growing up I just always adapted to the right handed world.

Kem
10-10-2012, 03:11 AM
A slightly different perspective that doesn't really answer the question at hand but may offer a different way of looking at it:

I'm in a strange position: I'm naturally right-handed, but when I was a baby, the nerve in my right arm was damaged. Ever since, my right hand has been slower and weaker than my left. I write with my right hand (fine motor skills) but open jars and throw balls with my left (gross motor skills); since I'm actually right-handed, and my left hand SHOULD be weaker than my right, this has given me the appearance of unusual clumsiness and lack of strength. With instruments, I've always played right-handed. The one real problem with this is that in most instruments I play, it's the right hand that needs to be the quickest and strongest one. On an instrument such as the flute on which both hands have to do approximately the same amount of work, I'm held back by both the fact that my right hand is a little slow and the fact that my left hand is not dominant. On the ukulele and other stringed instruments, as well as the piano and the accordion, I sometimes feel as if I am pushing my right hand through mollasses. The type of picking I do (with all four fingers at once) gives me the illusion of the sort of speed I am otherwise physically incapable of attaining. However, I am also hyper-aware that my left hand has its own job to do, and that requires speed and dexterity as well, a fact that becomes apparent when I play plectrum instruments such as the mandolin. The left hand's job, on stringed instruments, is often more fiddly than the right's. In other words, when I play stringed instruments, my natural inclinations are reversed; I use my right hand and arm for the job that involves strength and speed and my left for the job that involves manual dexterity.

Long story short: with almost any instrument, both hands have a job to do. I do think that part of the reason I don't have a problem reversing the natural inclination of my hands when I play stringed instruments is that I see music as moving from left to right: on the page, up the piano keyboard, up the fretboard. Left is low, and right is high (the exception here is in wind instruments, in which right is low, and left is high). Even though my left hand is stronger, I couldn't use it to strum or pick because I would see that as backwards and get confused. Genuinely left-handed people may see music as running from right to left (I couldn't say), but considering the orientation not only of almost every stringed and keyed instrument but of music on the page, they may not. Maybe it depends on one's musical background; a lefty trained in piano and/or written music may be more inclined to succumb to the right-handed view of the musical world.

(These are just random thoughts. Please forgive any ignorance in the above.)

staylor
10-10-2012, 04:15 AM
I'm a left-handed player who can't keep time with my right hand, so I have no choice. Some of us are made that way. I have to look a little harder for instruments, sometimes modify right-handed ones and have few choices in most music stores, but I'm happy with my little collection of guitars, ukes and mandolins. I don't believe there's a correct or incorrect way to play any instrument as long as the sounds you're making are musical to you, you're having fun and not hurting anyone else.

Patrick Madsen
10-10-2012, 04:43 AM
I'm another old timer that is left handed and plays right handed.

fitncrafty
10-10-2012, 06:18 AM
Looks like we are not alone. I am also a lefty that plays right handed. I do everything else left handed, It is the natural way I picked it up. So I went with it.
I have 2 boys that are both left handed and play guitar lefthanded. I bought them both left handed guitars because they naturally turned the guitar hero guitar upside down. MY youngest doesn't try to play the ukuleles in our house. My oldest gets a inclination to play occasionally, he is a natural (darn him) and he turns it upside down. He can read the tab and everything plays fantastically that way...
I just did what felt comfortable and natural to me.. I wonder if there are any right handed people that fret with their dominant hand?

KamakOzzie
10-10-2012, 06:49 AM
Add me to the list of leftys playing righty. I started with saxophone in elementary school and when I picked up guitar in the sixties, I don't think I even knew of left hand guitars. That was pre Jimi Hendrix. I gave up trying to play fiddle because the bowing was too awkward. I tried it left handed, but the fingering was even worse than the bowing. So now, mandolin, banjo, bass and uke are all right handed.

Bill

Plainsong
10-10-2012, 01:08 PM
Being a lefty was schooled out of me by my grandparents when I was little. Not that they were mean or anything, they just were consistently switching my hands around while eating, catching or throwing, learning to write. So now I write righty, but just about everything else, I don't have a side preference. Though I absolutely have to carry a bag on my left shoulder and the lead conducting arm is left.

We went back and forth when I learned guitar as to which side to hold it, but with uke I just started righty. I started righty, but when I air uke, it's always lefty. I'm not going to relearn it now, but it could be that I'd be a lot better if I played left. Who knows...

guitarman
10-10-2012, 02:15 PM
Another lefty playing righty! When I was learning guitar, I started to "correct" myself to avoid the inconvenience of having to look for a left handed instrument. I eventually got used to it. Glad to know there are other lefties here that play with their right. \m/

itsme
10-10-2012, 04:41 PM
I'm a righty to start with, but most instruments require dexterity in both hands. If anything, I'd think that fretting requires more effort than strumming, so a lefty probably actually has an advantage in fretting with their left hand.

joekulele
10-10-2012, 06:38 PM
I'm a lefty who plays right handed as well. I think it may have to be something said for first time learning. I taught myself how to play. I had never played a stringed instrument before, so I really had nothing to compare it to. All the teaching books, websites etc. that I used were oriented to right handed playing. I tried stringing one of my Fleas left handed once and it was way awkward.

On a side note, I remember seeing an old Tiny Tim (lefty uker) video where he is playing a guitar RIGHT handed, sets it down and starts a new song with his ukulele LEFT handed! Talk about the ol' switcheroo!

-joe

BobbyM
10-10-2012, 07:14 PM
Another lefty playing righty. I tried picking up the guitar when I was younger but got frustrated, everything being backwards and upside down. Learning the uke just shy of 2 months, I find myself struggling when I strum complex patterns. I feel so uncoordinated. I keep missing the strings on the up strum and hitting my index finger on the neck on down strums.

Pukulele Pete
10-11-2012, 12:59 AM
On a side note, I remember seeing an old Tiny Tim (lefty uker) video where he is playing a guitar RIGHT handed, sets it down and starts a new song with his ukulele LEFT handed! Talk about the ol' switcheroo!

-joe
From what I have read , Tiny played guitar and ukulele left and right handed.

Pukulele Pete
10-11-2012, 01:02 AM
Another lefty playing righty. I tried picking up the guitar when I was younger but got frustrated, everything being backwards and upside down. Learning the uke just shy of 2 months, I find myself struggling when I strum complex patterns. I feel so uncoordinated. I keep missing the strings on the up strum and hitting my index finger on the neck on down strums.
I dont think this has anything to do with being lefty and playing righty, i think it has to do with practice.

Plainsong
10-11-2012, 01:21 AM
Another lefty playing righty. I tried picking up the guitar when I was younger but got frustrated, everything being backwards and upside down. Learning the uke just shy of 2 months, I find myself struggling when I strum complex patterns. I feel so uncoordinated. I keep missing the strings on the up strum and hitting my index finger on the neck on down strums.

I think that's why I air-uke lefty. if I want to mimic some fast pattern, it feels better on the left wrist... even though that's the wrist I broke ages ago and really doesn't bend as much as the right one. Also, the left being my conducting arm, leaving the right for cues only, I'm more sure of the rhythm on the left wrist. But then actually holding a real uke... I go right. I think it'd be a pain to switch now though.

Bob-in-Alberta
10-11-2012, 06:41 AM
I'm another lefty that plays right handed. I took guitar lessons for a couple of years a long time ago and my teacher thought that it was just easier to adapt. We lefties are always adapting to other right handed things anyway. One more doesn't hurt.

gnordenstam
10-11-2012, 08:06 AM
I'm another lefty that plays righty. When I was buying my first string instrument, a mandolin, the shop owner suggested I try it as a righty for a couple of months and if it wasn't working out would get me a lefty. It worked out fine and makes it easier to pick up and try Ukes in the store or at a club meeting. Definitely a plus for me.

000Kanaka000
10-11-2012, 08:12 AM
My dad started me on guitar and there was only one *right* way to play
it in his mind so indeed learned to play the usual way. Can't say if my
strumming is worse or not due to the way it's worked out. Everything
else i do is left handed. i do play cajon and maybe that is helping the
right hand rhythm a bit. i put the guitar down for a lot of years but the
Uke is another matter am enjoying it and will stick with it.

Ukuleleblues
10-11-2012, 02:52 PM
My wife is left handed and plays a right hand uke, left handed. (chords look upside down and backwards to most folks) but she play the bass left handed with a left handed bass.