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View Full Version : My New Kanile'a is Here!!!



Immelman
11-24-2008, 07:54 AM
I received my Kanile'a K-1 Concert from MGM Friday afternoon. I wondered how hard it might be to learn uke chords after playing guitar all my life, but no problem. It's a gorgeous instrument--sounds good too. Just one little problem. Is it typical of Kanile'a frets to be a bit rough? All of mine have sharp edges. They seem to be correct length; they don't extend past the fret board. It just feels like they are sharp where the angle is cut. I'm not sure if I'll try to correct it myself or not take chances and take it to a luthier and have him knock off those edges. Oh, one other thing that seemed a bit strange--the neck smells fairly strongly of polyurethane (or whatever they finish it with). Hopefully that will fade after a little while. Overall though, I'm having fun with the new baby. Nice case too.

Kanaka916
11-24-2008, 08:17 AM
Never noticed that on the Kanile'a's I've played. You may wanna address your concerns with Mike. As far as the finish goes, Kanile'a uses two, Satin (http://kanileaukulele.com/satinFinish.php?osCsid=8e0b93e25fc6fd703f83a804818 c16cb) finish and a UV (http://kanileaukulele.com/uvCured.php?osCsid=8e0b93e25fc6fd703f83a804818c16c b) finish.

ke leo
11-24-2008, 08:18 AM
Congrats! Looove my Kanile'a!!!! My edges are a little sharper than normal too. It doesn't bother me enough to mess with it though.

Lawn Jockey
11-24-2008, 08:20 AM
Congrats!!!!

Good information to know as I am a lifelong guitarist myself.

My Poe should be here tomorrow.

Do the fret ends display the symptoms we guitarists refer to as "fret sprout" due to a dry instrument?

In my experience with finish odors (even nitro) on new instruments is that they will fade. As a matter of fact I've even been told by Morris Mandolins to hang my instruments (after I received them from him) for up to two weeks......and not to put them in the case to help the finish cure and let the odor fade.

Good luck either way.....and enjoy!!!

Immelman
11-24-2008, 08:52 AM
No--it's not fret sprout. They seem to fit just right. As I run my finger along the side of the fretboard I can tell the frets are nice and flush. It's the top corner of the frets where they are cut. Every one is the same all the way up the neck. It's like they skipped a step in their process. It's not worth asking the company to do anything about it. I'd be better off asking my luthier to correct it than going through the trouble of sending it back to Hawaii.

Mine has the high-gloss UV finish. It's only the neck that smells though. I wonder if they use a different finish on it. I'll try to keep it out of the case as much as I dare. The air has been quite dry lately.

wearymicrobe
11-24-2008, 10:27 AM
No--it's not fret sprout. They seem to fit just right. As I run my finger along the side of the fretboard I can tell the frets are nice and flush. It's the top corner of the frets where they are cut. Every one is the same all the way up the neck. It's like they skipped a step in their process. It's not worth asking the company to do anything about it. I'd be better off asking my luthier to correct it than going through the trouble of sending it back to Hawaii.

Mine has the high-gloss UV finish. It's only the neck that smells though. I wonder if they use a different finish on it. I'll try to keep it out of the case as much as I dare. The air has been quite dry lately.

A few of mine have that, specifically the older ones but I digress. Its more then likely just a change in you hands from using guitar frets to ukulele width frets. I not that as well when I go back and forth from electric guitar to ukuele.

grappler
11-24-2008, 10:51 AM
congrats on the new uke!

experimentjon
11-24-2008, 02:10 PM
Hmm, I own one with the UV finish, but it had been airing out in the store for a while before I got it, so it didn't smell. Can't say the same for the case for my Kanilea...that thing was funky smelling. I just threw a box of bounce fabric softener in there, in place of the uke, and in a few days it smelled fine again. I guess your uke will air out with time too.

As for the frets, I've played several kanileas and have never run into that problem. I did have a problem with sharp frets on one of my cheaper Leolani ukes, just sanded that one down myself. But I hope you fix that, since Aquilas don't like sharp edges...and aquilas are expensive.

Waterguy
11-24-2008, 02:34 PM
Kanile'a K-1 tenor is my first foray into the high end of ukulele's. I know nothing about guitars except that every time I tried to learn to play one, I gave up in frustration in under a month. For whatever reason, I connect with uke. I seem to end up playing my uke for a minimum of an hour a day. That time seems to be extending since the K-1 arived, it just sounds so pretty.

I love my Kanile'a and am having a hard time understanding the fact that someone could find fault in this intrument, but I also understand that you are not playing the same instrument that I am. What I can tell you is that MGM's customer sevice is kind of legendary around here so if you have any issues with any instrument you purchased from him you should let him know. He will do whatever he can to make it right.

tozan
11-24-2008, 03:45 PM
Congratulations on the new Kanile'a! I received my K-2 Tenor from MGM last week. We were probably eyeballing the same ukuleles on his website.
I didn't have the fret-end problem with the Kanile'a but I did have one with the Ohana I got. Initially it was fine but as someone mentioned the fret board dried out and the fret-edges became more noticeable. It doesn't bother me enough to pay to have it fixed and I'd probably wouldn't take a file to it myself. Kanile'as are beautiful sounding/looking instruments and MGM is an ace.:cool:

OrangUke
11-24-2008, 04:10 PM
Congrats on the new K1. I've had mine for about 3 months now and it still brings a smile when I lift her out of the case. The fret ends on mine are finished quite nicely - no rough or sharp edges. This is a high end instrument - I'd discuss with MGM.

uluapoundr
11-24-2008, 05:02 PM
Congrats on a great uke! I'm sure you're waiting for your cashback like me. I would clean up the frets so you don't run into string wear like others mentioned, plus, it really should feel good in your hands.

Post some pics when you got the time!

UkuLeLesReggAe
11-24-2008, 05:10 PM
congrats!!

i want a new uke :(

Kekani
11-24-2008, 07:08 PM
This is a high end instrument - I'd discuss with MGM.

This is about $1500 shy of a being a high end instrument. The frets are done as most manufacturers do on their rack instruments, they're beveled evenly.

I've yet to see an `ukulele off the rack with dressed frets.

Dressed frets should be expected on high end instruments, but not something off the rack. Of course, I would still expect them to be clean, and not extending past the edge.

I'm sure if you order a custom from Joe (through MGM), you'll see better dressed frets. If you don't, then you'll have something to discuss with MGM.

-Aaron

experimentjon
11-24-2008, 07:54 PM
This is about $1500 shy of a being a high end instrument. The frets are done as most manufacturers do on their rack instruments, they're beveled evenly....


Jeesh. Well, I'm with OrangUke and Waterguy on this one, and I still consider my off-the-rack Kanilea, Kamaka, and KoAloha to be high end ukes. I mean, maybe my ukes aren't the Bentleys, Maseratis, or Rolls Royces of ukes, but I don't think you can discredit the equivalent of a Benz, Lexus, or Audi uke.

Basically, even if cars from those makers aren't the far upper echelons of expensive cars, I think most would still consider them to be high-end cars. So even though these ukes may not be at the level of customs (at which point, you're paying mainly for look,) they're still rather expensive for most people, myself included.

uluapoundr
11-24-2008, 09:43 PM
I don't mean to hijak this thread but I believe the term "high end" is used by some to reference ukes that are custom, usually costing $1500+. Others may call "high end" ukes those that cost more than a Kala or Lanikai, say an off-the-rack Kamaka, Kanilea, or Koaloha. Perhaps it's a matter of semantics.

I do agree with Aaron that most off-the-rack ukes don't have frets that are dressed. When you pay for a custom uke, especially one that is $1500+, it's expected that the frets would be dressed. Usually, more time is put into a custom uke, which may mean a finish that has taken more time such as multiple coats of nitrocellulose or french polishing. Sure you pay for figured koa and inlays for looks, but along with that you also pay for a quality build that may include a finely shaped nut and saddle, upgraded fretboard material, polished and dressed frets, bracing unique to each uke, tuning of the soundboard,, higher end tuners, action that is adjusted for playablility and intonation, tight fit joints, and an uke that perhaps is tailored to your request.

The off-the-rack Kanilea are great ukes but there is an obvious difference between it and custom, higher priced ukes both in looks, playability, and even sound.

MGM
11-24-2008, 10:03 PM
Well with all the conjecture going on i can asssure you that every Kanilea I have seen has individully hand dressed frets. Every Single Kanilea made is dressed leveled and polished by one person BIll Griffin head luthier at Kanilea who has been doing it for over 30 years. .....That does not negate that this persons uke may be sharp or pokey somewhere but stop all the guesssing...They are dressed i see them do it every ukulele when i am at their factory...Some may or may not feel the same as others and again what is pokey to soom may not be pokey to others. many other factors occur that can cause a fret end to fell pokey to one ...from wood shrinkage or expansion to playing style....one is just your hands....I have very tough hands and skin that came with years of constrruction work and woodwooking and I tend to have leathery skin. Another may be a office worker or professional whose hands are baby soft and much more sensitive than mine. Also due to climate/ temperature humidity/pressure changes as when being shipped wheather severe or slight ....the condition of how a uke felt when it left the factory may not be the same as when one receives it.

Kekani
11-24-2008, 10:12 PM
You know, I had this whole response that I just deleted, which is great because uluapoundr responded best.

If you want well dressed frets, have them done. Nate Ching (Guitarsmith) does legendary "geometrically shaped" fretwork. There are others that will have you sporting semi-hemispherical frets, which is the new rage in custom guitars. Personally, I like a 4 angle job sanded and polished into a wider F/B with a beveled edge running into the binding. Depending on the level of detail, you can probably get this done for $25 - $75.

experimentjon
11-24-2008, 10:46 PM
I don't mean to hijak this thread but I believe the term "high end" is used by some to reference ukes that are custom, usually costing $1500+. Others may call "high end" ukes those that cost more than a Kala or Lanikai, say an off-the-rack Kamaka, Kanilea, or Koaloha. Perhaps it's a matter of semantics.

You're right. I was just put off by the way that the conversation went...it seemed to go something like:
A: This is a high end uke, you should be able to get that problem fixed.
B: Actually no, you haven't spent nearly enough on it; don't expect perfection.

Probably just magnified by this awful pitchbook and analyst report I'm working on now. Uggh. My brain.

Carry on merrily. :)

Immelman
11-25-2008, 05:25 AM
These frets were not dressed as described. They are sharp at the top corners where they are cut. I've played guitar for a long time and none of my guitars have ever been like this. It's not terrible, but an obvious oversight by someone. I'll knock off the sharp edges myself, or bring it to a luthier. It's really only noticeable when sliding a finger up or down the neck at the first and fourth strings. The frets are otherwise fine. I think they are probably just burrs that weren't knocked off after cutting. It's on every fret.

LoMa
11-25-2008, 06:27 AM
Sharp corners or burrs on the top of the frets are a no-no... that is not proper dressing and it can cut or graze your strings causing them to snap or wreck the intonation... it's not a humidity thing or a uke vs guitar frets thing, that's just improperly dressed frets. I play guitars and ukes both.

Kanile'a is a factory and like many factories, quality control isn't always as good as it should be, even if most of the time it is... some things slip through... I've owned and played several Kanilea's and all of them had finish, playability, or structural flaws of one kind or another, some significant and others not significant (ranging from an unevenly applied finish in spots, severe top bellying because they didn't use a bridge plate, poor intonation, the A string too close to the edge of the fretboard, poor routing for the purfling resulting in gaps). They all had a fine tone though and I never had a problem with their fret dressing. Anyway, it turned me off Kanilea's, even though I know others rave about their Kanilea's. I've probably just had bum luck and I've also heard they have better quality control with their newer ukes. My ukes were all 4 years or older.

Never had any problems with KoAloha's, Larrivee's, LoPrnizi's, or vintage Martin concerts and sopranos, all of which are mid-priced ukes in the the $400-$650 range (you can also get high-end LoPrinzi;s with a lot of bling too, and Larrivee's are more exensive than they used to be because they;re rare). But there's probably someone who has problems with these fine brands...

Anyway, if you're keeping the uke, you should have the frets dressed. MGM might cover the cost of a local luthier doing that since it would be cheaper to do it that way than back and forth shipping.

I hope you get the problem resolved and love that uke to all heck!

Immelman
11-25-2008, 06:45 AM
It's not a problem for the strings. The strings do not contact the sharp spots. It's just the top corners of the frets. The rest of the fret surfaces are fine.

upskydowncloud
11-25-2008, 09:08 AM
hey do we get to see a photo of your new uke? I'd like to see one!

Immelman
11-25-2008, 09:30 AM
Sure. As soon as I figure out the camera and how to post, I'll get some shots. It's a pretty little thing.

Kanaka916
11-25-2008, 10:42 AM
Use an image hosting site such as Photobucket, Imageshack, etc. Once you upload your images, copy the image url provided and paste it into reply box of the forum.

wearymicrobe
11-25-2008, 06:30 PM
Kanile'a is a factory and like many factories, quality control isn't always as good as it should be, even if most of the time it is... some things slip through... I've owned and played several Kanilea's and all of them had finish, playability, or structural flaws of one kind or another, some significant and others not significant (ranging from an unevenly applied finish in spots, severe top bellying because they didn't use a bridge plate, poor intonation, the A string too close to the edge of the fretboard, poor routing for the purfling resulting in gaps). They all had a fine tone though and I never had a problem with their fret dressing. Anyway, it turned me off Kanilea's, even though I know others rave about their Kanilea's. I've probably just had bum luck and I've also heard they have better quality control with their newer ukes. My ukes were all 4 years or older.



If you think Kanile'a cranks ukes out like a factory then there is probably no convincing you but every one that I have played, built in the last ~3 years has been spot on. Quality control is Bill's job and he is one of the best in the industry. Now one might have gotten by when someone else was doing the setup but above a K4 I don't think anybody but Bill/Joe touches them.

Early kanile's old label/old bracing/thin headstock are not the greatest in the areas you described, mind you it was one guy and a room full of tools so that is to be a little expected. They have gotten better and have gone from a small brand to a much larger company so stuff happens.

Aside

Custom means you ordered it for yourself built to please, not ordered from MGM but from the builder or a distributer.

High end, if I had to give a number starts above 3K for a non bligy tenor for the major guys and 2K for the small run shops (10-12 a year)

OrangUke
11-28-2008, 03:56 AM
This is about $1500 shy of a being a high end instrument. The frets are done as most manufacturers do on their rack instruments, they're beveled evenly.

I've yet to see an `ukulele off the rack with dressed frets.

Dressed frets should be expected on high end instruments, but not something off the rack. Of course, I would still expect them to be clean, and not extending past the edge.

I'm sure if you order a custom from Joe (through MGM), you'll see better dressed frets. If you don't, then you'll have something to discuss with MGM.

-Aaron


Well Aron,
Yes and No - As far as where it falls in between the low end plywood jungle ukes and the top end abelone decked hand built museum pieces it may not be "High End". However, for many (probably most) of us who struggle to scrape together a few extra bucks for our hobbies after paying all the bills, it is definately "High End". When I spend over $500 for an instrument, I expect it to be a quality instrument. For the price of one Kanile'a, I could have bought two Ponos. (Not disparaging them, it's just the first name that came to mind. They are very nice instruments for the price.) Do I expect it to be twice a good - no. But I do expect a Kanile'a (or any other top quality manufacturer) to offer quality construction and materials of a higher order than a $150 box, which also classifies it as high end in my book. My Kaneli'a is not a $3000 instrument, but, frankly, I can't imagine a better built instrument than it already is. Adding in some fancy woods, binds and inlay would make a prettier uke, but not any more functional.

Frankly, if I spent over $500 for an instrument and it had sharp edged frets I'd discuss with the builder and/or retailer. The fret ends on my K1 are as they should be.

Cheers

upskydowncloud
11-28-2008, 06:43 AM
Well Aron,
Yes and No - As far as where it falls in between the low end plywood jungle ukes and the top end abelone decked hand built museum pieces it may not be "High End". However, for many (probably most) of us who struggle to scrape together a few extra bucks for our hobbies after paying all the bills, it is definately "High End". When I spend over $500 for an instrument, I expect it to be a quality instrument. For the price of one Kanile'a, I could have bought two Ponos. (Not disparaging them, it's just the first name that came to mind. They are very nice instruments for the price.) Do I expect it to be twice a good - no. But I do expect a Kanile'a (or any other top quality manufacturer) to offer quality construction and materials of a higher order than a $150 box, which also classifies it as high end in my book. My Kaneli'a is not a $3000 instrument, but, frankly, I can't imagine a better built instrument than it already is. Adding in some fancy woods, binds and inlay would make a prettier uke, but not any more functional.

Frankly, if I spent over $500 for an instrument and it had sharp edged frets I'd discuss with the builder and/or retailer. The fret ends on my K1 are as they should be.

Cheers

I agree. Let's remember that Aldrine plays a Kamaka HF-3 which you can pick up for $882, I can recall very few people with more expensive ukes sounding anywhere as good as he is. I'd rather have a ukulele that sounds good like that and looks plain as opposed to some ridiculous over-inlayed show piece that you're too scared to even take out the case let alone play.

uluapoundr
11-28-2008, 09:13 AM
I'm a little hesitant to respond as I don't want this thread on Immelman's Kanilea to now be a discussion on what to expect in a $500+ ukulele, but, the discussion is somewhat relevent, since Immelman commented that his uke had sharp frets and others stated a $500+ uke shouldn't have sharp frets.

Funny how the preception of the uke community on quality ukes has changed with the popularity of import ukuleles in the last few years. Today, one can purchase an import tenor for around $200 and expect it to sound and play pretty decent, this was unheard of 10 years ago. Granted, this is a good things for all of us. With that said, it seems that when some spend say $500 or $800, they are expecting a "custom" level instrument build. I'll keep saying again, there often is a difference in ukes that cost $800 to a custom one that cost $2000, and I'm not talking about only inlays, curly wood, and binding.

I feel a bit weird trying to prove my point, perhaps I should just save my breath. I guess I should say for those who don't see any difference in an $800 uke and one that is custom built, then great, you'll save yourself a lot of money. For others who can see, hear, and feel the difference, you know what I'm talking about.

Immelman, keep us updated on your Kanilea. I hope that despite the sharp frets that you're enjoying it.

Waterguy
11-28-2008, 03:30 PM
Ok, I am an early poster in this thread and I am going to admit right off the bat that I am no expert when it comes to uke building. I own 3 uke's. A yellow Mahallo, a Kala KA ST, and a Kanile'a K1 tenor.

I called my K1 my first foray into high end uke's,

I put a lot of thought into my purchase of my K1 because my family has 4 kids and one income. Spending near a grand on something that is not an absolute necessisty is not something I have done before I bought my K1. It caused a little friction between my wife and I but I do not regret my purchase. For those who think this is a "factory made" uke, I recomend spending some time going through this-

http://kanileaukulele.com/kanileaProcess_MillingProcess1.php?osCsid=cdccfe9c 2a5fa19666032da7b3c8527c

That may fit some poeples definition of a factory, but I see a group of individuals who take a certain amount of pride in doing thier job correctly.

I may be wrong. I can say this though. When I used to play my Kala along to Aldrine's lessons my sound never seemed to be there even when I was hitting all the right notes. When I do the same thing with my K1, I sound fine unless I make a mistake.

Now there may well be significant sound and playability improvements in a uke that costs 1500 more than my K1. In all honesty I will probably never know because I doubt I will ever handle one. For me, a Kanile'a K1 tenor is as high end as it is ever likely to get. I will add that I would bet real money that the majority of uke players would be a bit jealous that I had the means to buy one.

It's an unbelievably pretty sounding instrument with not one sharp edge on it.

This argument really needs to end. High end in an instrument is all perception. If you are someone who is struggling for every single meal, a Mahalo is an extravagence that you will never afford. If you are someone who looks at a Lexus and sees a cheap auto, a Kanile'a K1 will seem cheap. To me, a Kanile'a K1 is a barely affordable extravagence.

Arguing on this point just shows, for the most part, who has lots of disposable cash.

It's mildly interesting but in the end, not what this sight is about. The original poster had issues with a uke that costs near a grand. Any uke issue at that cost is wrong. The only real problem is that instead of talking to the seller or the manufacturer, the poster put the problem here. That sort of thing is almost guaranteed to bring out some feisty posts.

I could ramble longer but.... I'm guessing if Immelman had talked to either MGM or Joe Souza before posting that this post would never have reached page 2.

OK, done rambling

Kekani
11-28-2008, 04:46 PM
I typed this nice long response, then deleted. Waterguy, you mentioned a good word. . .perception. They differ, period.

That said, I've heard through the grapevine that Kanile`a does, indeed, dress their frets, on their rack instruments. So, Mr. Immelman, disregard anything I said in the posts above, because I'm wrong. Bring up your issue with Joe - I'm sure he'll take care of it.

-Aaron

MANDOLELE
11-29-2008, 03:50 PM
Aloha everyone -

I thought I'd better step in here as MGM was kind enough to bring me into this discussion - and quite rightly.

First things first - Immelman, I'm truely sorry that the fret ends on your Kanile'a aren't all you would wish for.

MGM is correct - I am responsible for the final set up on every instrument that leaves our shop - from bridge placement to fret dressing to final inspection.

I've done over 3,000 since coming to Kanile'a - and we've only had maybe a half-dozen complaints re: frets in all that time. That doesn't mean I couldn't have missed some sharp edges on yours, but let me state that my intention is that every Kanile'a be set up and play as if it were my own personal instrument.

For many years I worked at Cowboystar Guitars in Santa Barbara, CA as an instrument repair guy and I can tell you from experience that every player has his own idea of how his or her frets should be. You're coming from guitar - so it might be that the smaller frets we use (close to mandolin fret wire on our standard models) might feel a bit different to you - or maybe they're just sharp - I wouldn't know without seeing the instrument.

What I do know is I can only dress frets for what most players would deem reasonable - and as I'll never even meet most of the folks who will play our instruments that's how I approach it (although you're always welcome at our shop). I can tell you that any Kanile'a owner who comes to our shop here on Oahu with any concern will not leave dissatisfied with any aspect of the way their instrument plays.

You are certainly welcome to send your K-1 to us for further fret work, but my advise is to take it to a local guy you trust and have those frets made to feel the way YOU want them - it's really the best way to get what you want, and you won't have to risk the round-trip via the mail. It should be a 10-15 minute job at most.

As for your fretboard - it and your bridge are raw rosewood, without finish as is customary. Both are treated with a mixture of Linseed and Lemon oils to protect them from dirt and from drying out. Any odor should be short-lived. Fretboards and bridges should be "nourished" occasionally to keep them healthy.

Having said all that, the good news is that I really do listen to all feedback - and while it's always nice to hear positive comments, it's posts such as yours that always cause us to re-examine our methods in an effort to improve what we do - always.

Aloha and mahalo nui loa -

MGM
12-01-2008, 08:10 PM
Isnt it great when you can get an answer straight from the horses mouth rather than banter back and fourth the maybe and what if's thanks for replying Bill.

Waterguy
12-02-2008, 12:08 AM
I have a quick question about this part of MANDOLEE's post -

"Fretboards and bridges should be "nourished" occasionally to keep them healthy."

By that, do you mean hitting them with linseed and lemon oil ocaisionally and what period of time is "ocaisionally" representing.

I'd really apreciate a reply on this as my current plan for my K1 involves willing it to one of my unborn grandkids or great grandkids:)

MANDOLELE
12-02-2008, 08:23 PM
Waterguy -

Yes - I use about a 50% combo of the two oils - frequency depends on humidity where the instrument spends most of its time. I "feed" my fretbaords probably once a year and hit the bridge while I'm at it.

When you feel the need for new strings, remove the old ones and apply oil with a Qtip - then wipe off with paper towel or soft cloth. Notice the color comes back to the wood when you do this - and you'll learn what a dry fretboard looks like by comparison.

Aloha -

Waterguy
12-03-2008, 02:53 PM
I am once again resurecting this post, largely cause I am a little embarassed at my manners.

Welcome to the forums Mandolele.

Honestly, someone with your backround in ukulele building usualy gets a huge hello around here. I'm guessing it's cause your first post was at the end of a thread that was about to disippear. If you throw a hello post up and explain who you are I am sure you will get a different result.

I'm not just posting this cause I want to periodically want to be able to ask someone directly about any issues I have with my K1.

Well maby I am.

One last little question, is the linseed oil natural or boiled?

MANDOLELE
12-04-2008, 09:38 AM
Mahalo for your welcome Waterguy -

That would be Boiled Linseed - mixed 50/50 with Lemon oil.

Aloha -

nikolo727
12-05-2008, 06:59 PM
I have a Lanikai that has almost perfectly dress frets. They're kind of tapered, right toward the ends on the fret board and none of them even stick out a little bit. They arent sharp either.


just throwin that out there lol, just to point out that it all depends on the ukulele. Like Mandolele said, everyonce in a while there is a "bad" or "minorly flawed" ukulele, but thats life.


EDIT:I epic fail at spelling