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lovinforkful
11-17-2012, 10:38 AM
After playing around with a Kala mahogany baritone at my local music shop earlier today, I have a bad case of baritone UAS (I'm going back Monday). I've only ever played and owned sopranos, so please tell me what I need to know about playing a baritone ukulele and whatever else you'd like to say about baris.

blue_knight_usa
11-17-2012, 10:41 AM
You'll need to learn all your new chords you make with the same chord shapes, thus a G on a GCEA Soprano won't be a G on a Baritone. All different, so you'll need to have two chord sets in your head for each chord. One for GCEA and one for DGBE tuning if your using the standard baritone tuning. I love the sound of the Baritone, I just can't get my head around learning all the new chords all over again such as remembering a C is really a G on a Baritone (I think), and such. Good luck, Bari's are awesome with other ukes to fill in that lower end beyond tenors.

Lalz
11-17-2012, 11:04 AM
You'll need to learn all your new chords you make with the same chord shapes, thus a G on a GCEA Soprano won't be a G on a Baritone. All different, so you'll need to have two chord sets in your head for each chord. One for GCEA and one for DGBE tuning if your using the standard baritone tuning. I love the sound of the Baritone, I just can't get my head around learning all the new chords all over again such as remembering a C is really a G on a Baritone (I think), and such. Good luck, Bari's are awesome with other ukes to fill in that lower end beyond tenors.

Or you could just pretend to still be playing in C and use the same chord shapes as usual. As long as you don't need to be in a specific key (e.g. playing with others or needing to sing in a specific key) you can do whatever you want. Good luck!

mds725
11-17-2012, 11:39 AM
I have several baritones and I love the way they sound. The key of the instrument is the same as the name of its third string, so sopranos, which are typically tuned GCEA, are said to be in the key of C, while baritones, when tuned DGBE, are in the key of G. As others have said, both tunings use the same chord shapes, but a C chord on a soprano (C tuned instrument) is a G chord on a baritone (G tuned instrument). When I first started playing baritones, I used GCEA chord shapes, which meant that whenever I played the C chord shape, I was playing a G chord, whenever I was playing an F chord shape, I was playing a C chord, etc. (One of the benefits of this, incidentally, is that you can play the same song in two different keys using the same shapes.)

I've since been training myself to learn the names of the chord shapes when played on a baritone, and that hasn't been all that difficult once I realized that I can "count" on my fingers to determine the chord name or shape. For example, to determine the baritone name for the GCEA C shape, I make C my thumb and count up (D is my index finger, E is my middle finger, F is my ring finger, and G is my pinkie. For each chord shape, I go thumb to pinkie to get the baritone name of that chord shape. If I know the chord name but need to determine the shape, I make the chord name my thumb and count up to my ring finger. For example, to figure out what shape to use to play D on a DGBE baritone, I make D my thumb, E my index finger, F my middle finger, and G my ring finger. The chord shape for D on a baritone is the same as the chord shape for G on a GCEA ukulele.

You can also have a baritone ukulele strung GCEA, but unless you get octave lower GCEA strings (Guadalupe Strings in LA makes them) you end up with an ukulele that sounds a lot like a tenor, with probably a little more resonance at the lower end.

anthonyg
11-17-2012, 11:41 AM
I have ukulele's tuned to every step FROM DGBE and GCEA and sometimes I even use ADF#B! When your playing solo it doesn't matter and I use pitch change as a transposition tool. Don't like the key a song is in? Change it. I'm only thinking of two starting chord positions but honestly, when you start playing barre chords its EXACTLY the same issue. You have several positions for the same chord all over the neck.

Anthony

drbekken
11-17-2012, 11:50 AM
Baritones are wonderful. That's all there is to it.

Patrick Madsen
11-17-2012, 02:40 PM
I play a'62 Martin baritone. They're tuned like the bottom four strings of a guitar. The tuning is 5 steps down from a uke. So the c fingering in uke tuning is a g in bari. tuning. The way we play an f is a c in bari tuning. Pretty straightforward once you get the hang of transposing the chords. You can also put a capo up 5 frets and it'll be tuned like a c tuned uke.

For myself, I like the lower tuning of my Martin. It is a special sound only a bari can produce. It really adds depth when playing with a group. Congrats. on thinking about a bari.; they're a blast to play.

coolkayaker1
11-17-2012, 02:58 PM
You can also have a baritone ukulele strung GCEA, but unless you get octave lower GCEA strings (Guadalupe Strings in LA makes them) you end up with an ukulele that sounds a lot like a tenor, with probably a little more resonance at the lower end.

I have two baritones, and I found the DGBE unappealing to me. It's the same chord shapes (different names) as the sopranos, concert and tenors--I just didn;t dig the bari tone. ;lol So, Hilo standard GCEAs on both now---lovely! As mds725 says, it does sound like other ukes in tuning only; it's the same tuning. But, it sounds no more like other ukes than a tenor does to a concert does to a soprano. It does have more bass resonance, so sounds "deeper" even with GCEA tuning, and the long strings truly add to the sustain. Fabulous sustain!
http://pohakushop.com/?product=hilo-baritone-g-c-e-a-string-set

They all sound different. I think my baritone GCEA sounds more different than the tenor than does a tenor from a concert. Why? The body of a baritone is much bigger than a tenor. Not a little--a lot. So, I strongly advise anyone to have a baritone in GCEA, at least one.

You will experience some major adjustment with the widened fret spaces. An issue, sometimes, when barre chording above the fifth or sixth fret (unless you have giant hands). So, it's always a fit question, to some degree.

Enjoy!

itsme
11-17-2012, 03:04 PM
I play a'62 Martin baritone. They're tuned like the bottom four strings of a guitar.
No, no, no! A bari is tuned like the TOP four strings of a guitar, DGBE. If it were tuned like the bottom four, it would be EADG.

Urgh!!! Sorry, but it just gets my goat to see so many people here constantly refer to top and bottom (or 1st and 4th) strings incorrectly.

On a standard GCEA or gCEA uke, the A is always the top/1st string, the g/G (re-entrant or linear) is always the bottom/4th string.

/rant over. We now return you to your regularly scheduled programming. :p

coolkayaker1
11-17-2012, 03:11 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0xnNs56GsI

Itseme, see this video at 5:50 min. The are tuned like the physical bottom four strings of a guitar. They sound like the top (highest notes) of a guitar.

Now back to helping original poster./

OP, please read all the posts carefully, but my last one tells you that you have GCEA options. The DGBE option is, as you hear it from Aaron in the video above, sweet also.

BlackBearUkes
11-17-2012, 03:39 PM
Baritones are meant to be tuned DGBE. That is the tuning the instrument is made for, but being uke players, folks just can't seem to leave things alone. Now there are strings designed for the higher tunings some folks can be lazy and not adapt to a different tuning and "Oh no, you mean I have to learn new chords"! The uke has now so many different configurations in body sizes, necks, strings arrangements and players, that it has become a simple four string monster. That is just the way it is and that is why folks like it. You would think with 5 different ukes scales that it would be enough, I guess not!

itsme
11-17-2012, 03:44 PM
Itseme, see this video at 5:50 min. The are tuned like the physical bottom four strings of a guitar. They sound like the top (highest notes) of a guitar.
No, they are not. The guy from HMS is just plain wrong. Another perpetuation of misinformation that people tend to accept as fact because someone else said so.

If they were physically tuned like the bottom four strings of a guitar, they would be EADG. You can't "physically tune" a bari to EADG and have it sound like DGBE.

Note that there is a half step difference between the 2nd/3rd strings in the two configurations.

coolkayaker1
11-17-2012, 03:59 PM
lovingforkful: I found this video to be helpful with various tuning options for a baritone. Professional musician/luthier Aaron K. describes first the typical baritone tuning, and then alternative tunings. Check it out!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXvMXx0tWiE

Bottom line: get that baritone, and know that you have many options for tuning. Notice, although they may be "called" different things, to play the same sound with each tuning, Aaron uses exactly the same fingering. (as poster said below, when playing alone, just use same fingerings that you have learned on your soprano).

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
11-17-2012, 04:28 PM
I was convinced I'd be a soprano-only uke player forever---until I discovered the mellow, deep sound of the baritone uke, that is. I got a baritone uke (Kala KA-B) this past March. Love it! I use standard baritone tuning, and I use a capo to transpose songs to keys that are friendly to my voice while letting me play easy chords.

connor013
11-17-2012, 04:38 PM
Some good advice here already, but for what it's worth:

I was a soprano guy, got bit by the baritone bug, bought a baritone, dug it, still dig it (kind of), and am now again a soprano guy. (The bari lives at school for uke club.)

For me, it's a nice departure from what I consider a regular uke tone. But, for me, what it really solidified was just how much I love that clean soprano tone.

Just to be (un)clear: you should snag a baritone.

bariukish
11-18-2012, 04:47 AM
My wife and I LOVE our baris. We got these because we couldn't handle the six strings of guitars anymore. We love the rich base sound of the DGBE tuning. A month ago I got curious and bought a tenor just for comparison and to be able to more easily utilize the ukulele resources that are readily available online. I'm about as musically talented as a fence post but me all of a week to be able to learn the names of the cord shapes on both ukes. If I can do it you can probably do it faster. Now I'm a fan of both. Here's why: We have built a songbook of over 150 songs from the internet that contains multiple genres. Some sound better with the baris ( folk, country,etc) and some sound better with the tenor ( Jimmy Buffett, railroad songs,etc). Bottom line, get both, take a few days learning the names of the chord shapes and enjoy a much richer musical experience. Added bonus: you'll be very proud of your accomplishment.
Enjoy!

tejastani
11-19-2012, 03:08 AM
I found a string set and tuning that really work for me on baritone. On my dad's 1956 Silvertone solid mahogany bari I have been using dGBE tuning (d is re-entrant or an octave higher) and Worth brown florocarbon strings. The high d string sounds more uke-like and the lack of wound strings really cuts down on noise. I play bottleneck slide on this uke to combine ukulele fingerstyle and Sol Hoopii steel licks. I find I'm playing it more than my Ohana and LoPrinzi concerts.

Ondrej
11-19-2012, 11:30 PM
You can also have a baritone ukulele strung GCEA, but unless you get octave lower GCEA strings (Guadalupe Strings in LA makes them) you end up with an ukulele that sounds a lot like a tenor, with probably a little more resonance at the lower end.

I attach youtube show how sounds baritone ukulele GCEA tuning an octave lower.
The slow songs are the best.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEITmRg9tpc&feature=bf_prev&list=UUgAsFDORpIRCjiJ-7lIPG2Q
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8LQvDlq4OKY&feature=BFa&list=UUgAsFDORpIRCjiJ-7lIPG2Q

Ben_H
11-19-2012, 11:47 PM
I love both sopranos and baritones but i treat them as two different instruments rather than one just being a bigger version of the other. Sometimes it's a mood thing, other times I can't be bothered to transpose when playing with others. Unless you're going to play with others don't worry about learning new names for old chord shapes. (or use a capo as recommended above).

Doug from Southcoast will give you some interesting options on tunings and strings if you email him. For a while I was playing my baritone at home in Bb tuning with linear, flatwound strings (no squeak from the metal strings) but with a Shuub capo on the second fret when in company. Just play the songs as you would your soprano.

Warning - if you click with a baritone they're just as addictive as sops. You will want one with low D and high d, possibly one in a further tuning of Bb or C and if you're like me will be investigating opportunities for an 8 string before too long.

ukulelecowboy
11-20-2012, 12:05 AM
Baritones are meant to be tuned DGBE. That is the tuning the instrument is made for, but being uke players, folks just can't seem to leave things alone. Now there are strings designed for the higher tunings some folks can be lazy and not adapt to a different tuning and "Oh no, you mean I have to learn new chords"! The uke has now so many different configurations in body sizes, necks, strings arrangements and players, that it has become a simple four string monster. That is just the way it is and that is why folks like it. You would think with 5 different ukes scales that it would be enough, I guess not!

I take exception to this. Lazy? I spent a long time developing my playing skills and a significant part of it was working through the ukulele sizes to find what worked best for me. As it turns out, the baritone suited my physical size and finger stretch and happened to be a perfect match. I wanted the instrument to still maintain the tonal nuances of it's smaller brothers without sounding too much like a small guitar.

It had absolutely nothing to do with "learning new chords," etc.

I am a Baritone Ukulele Player. This is my collection and every one is tuned GCEA (low G tuning.) And I want to thank Dirk Wormhoudt at Southcoast for developing such a fine set of strings.

2012 Graziano Custom Baritone (build in progress)
'12 Ko'olau CE-1 Baritone
'11 Pono Acacia Deluxe Baritone
'09 Pono Mahogany Deluxe Baritone
'08 Pono Macassar Ebony and Cedar top Baritone
’64 Gibson BU1
'64 Guild BU-1 Baritone
'64 Favilla B2 Baritone
'72 Yasuma Model 51 Baritone
'75 C.F. Mountain Model 51 Baritone
'53 Vega Arthur Godfrey Solo Lute
'52 Vega Arthur Godfrey Baritone (deluxe)
'55 Harmony Model 695 Baritone
'65 Harmony Model 695 Baritone
'65 Airline Baritone
'59 Biltmore Short Scale Baritone
'71 Bobby Henshaw Baritone
'55 Kent Carmencita Baritone
'55 Kustom Kraft Baritone
'68 Lyra Baritone
'70 Giannini Baritone
'66 Aria Model 1255 Baritone
'10 Eleuke Mahogany Baritone
'72 Regal Spruce top Baritone
'68 Silvertone Baritone
'09 Kala KA-B Mahogany Baritone
'11 Cordoba Cuatro (as Baritone)
'09 Jupiter Creek Telecaster Steel String Baritone
'09 Oscar Schmidt OU55CE Koa Baritone
'70 Maccaferri Islander Plastic Baritone

drbekken
11-20-2012, 12:06 AM
I found a string set and tuning that really work for me on baritone. On my dad's 1956 Silvertone solid mahogany bari I have been using dGBE tuning (d is re-entrant or an octave higher) and Worth brown florocarbon strings. The high d string sounds more uke-like and the lack of wound strings really cuts down on noise. I play bottleneck slide on this uke to combine ukulele fingerstyle and Sol Hoopii steel licks. I find I'm playing it more than my Ohana and LoPrinzi concerts.
I agree wholeheartedly with this. A re-entrant baritone gives you the very best of both the tenor and the baritone ukulele - all rolled into one. The further up the fretboard you go, the more tenor-ish it sounds; and you get the deep, mellow baritone sound in the first positions or with open strings. I absolutely love it.

mm stan
11-20-2012, 12:52 AM
Aloha All,
I play my baritone dropped a half step to 2 half step lower...tha is either in F or F# ...it gives the baritone a much richer sound which I like....
To be clear music is about no boundries and what your preference is....the longer you play, the more you will learn and know what you want..

pabrizzer
11-20-2012, 12:53 AM
Baritones are meant to be tuned DGBE. That is the tuning the instrument is made for, but being uke players, folks just can't seem to leave things alone. Now there are strings designed for the higher tunings some folks can be lazy and not adapt to a different tuning and "Oh no, you mean I have to learn new chords"! The uke has now so many different configurations in body sizes, necks, strings arrangements and players, that it has become a simple four string monster. That is just the way it is and that is why folks like it. You would think with 5 different ukes scales that it would be enough, I guess not!

Absolutely correct about the tuning.
But there is NOTHING WRONG OR LAZY with other tunings as long as you know you are playing a really big tenor (or concert or soprano).
But you are NOT playing a BARITONE ukulele - you are using your baritone to be something else.

I love my baritone and tune it as was intended. I use it as a brain test and often enjoy jumping from bari to tenor when playing the same songs. Tests the brain and the fingers.

ukulelecowboy
11-20-2012, 04:06 AM
Absolutely correct about the tuning.
But there is NOTHING WRONG OR LAZY with other tunings as long as you know you are playing a really big tenor (or concert or soprano).
But you are NOT playing a BARITONE ukulele - you are using your baritone to be something else.

I love my baritone and tune it as was intended. I use it as a brain test and often enjoy jumping from bari to tenor when playing the same songs. Tests the brain and the fingers.

Well, as a lazy, big tenor (or giant soprano) ukulele player, I would like to disagree. How many different tunings exist for a traditional guitar? If you vary from the "standard" EADGBE are you not longer player a guitar? Of course not.

The notion that the baritone was "meant" to be tuned DGBE is only built around the idea that it was a so called "transitional" instrument for migrating guitar players. Like Arthur Godfrey. String formulations for ukuleles were practically non-existant. In the instrument's infancy, how else would you tune it? Any attempt at loading higher octave strings would result in failure.

Lyle Ritz tuned his tenor ukulele, DGBE. Was he no longer playing a tenor but rather a small scale baritone?

pabrizzer
11-20-2012, 01:24 PM
Hybrids are fantastic things.
Because they are created for a purpose they are often better, faster, taller, tastier, sweeter smelling, smaller, bigger, longer lasting etc, etc than the original.
They are created by intelligent, thoughtful people - often to make life simpler or the world a better place.
They often are so good they eventually become more popular than the original.
But no matter how wonderful they are - they are hybrids.

coolkayaker1
11-20-2012, 04:25 PM
Aloha All,
I play my baritone dropped a half step to 2 half step lower...tha is either in F or F# ...it gives the baritone a much richer sound which I like....
To be clear music is about no boundries and what your preference is....the longer you play, the more you will learn and know what you want..

I do the same, Stan.

coolkayaker1
11-20-2012, 04:26 PM
How many different tunings exist for a traditional guitar? If you vary from the "standard" EADGBE are you not longer player a guitar?


True dat. If alternate tunings make a guitar not a guitar, then I guess Keef Richards is a xylophone player.:):)

J'Ukebox
11-20-2012, 06:12 PM
Hi, lovinforkful!

So have U made your decision/purchase yet? As U can see, it is a VERY personal choice, with many options available. Personally, i am a Bari girl all the way... if i had not stumbled upon the bari i don't think i would have stayed very long with the uke... the others just do NOT do it for me like the Bari does... I LIKE them, but I just don't resonate in the same way with them... AND, for the record, i am a traditional DGBE tuner, with a solid mahogany body & Martin strings, I have found the sound I LOVE! I have a total of 8 ukes, and i play the others every so often just for variety, so many varied voices & sizes are fun, but the sound i seriously groove with is the mahog. bari. I enjoy hearing OTHER folks playin' other sizes & tunings, but for myself, the Bari DGBE is so far the ultimate. Maybe it's due to coming from a very, very long ago guitar background, I don't know... but U totally owe it to yourself to check out the Baritone, as it COULD possibly be YOUR peak uke experience as well!!

Phooto
11-20-2012, 08:30 PM
"Barry", my Baritone ukulele is stung with low G CEA tuning. So, the benefit of a big sound and 'normal' tuning so that I didn't have to learn new chords. We christened this a "Brutulele" for the big sound.

Phooto
11-20-2012, 10:11 PM
I recently tuned my baritone to GCEA for about half an hour. It sounded great, but I did not like what the extra tension did to the top, so it is back to DGBE.
Aquila do have GCEA strings available for Baritone as well as a red low G, that's what I used, so tension is the same as regular strings on these.

Ben_H
11-20-2012, 10:19 PM
Southcoast will sell you strings specifically for GCEA so the string tensions are appropriate to a baritone body and neck.

On the subject of baritone tunings, unfortunately I cannot find the reference so not sure where I heard or read this but I was led to believe that the original baritones were meant to be in a slightly higher tuning but drifted into DGBE as they became popular with converting guitarists and started being marketed as a halfway house. The rest, as they say, is history.

Phooto
11-20-2012, 10:40 PM
I got mine all sorted from Omega Music in the UK. Link to the string are here - http://omegamusic.co.uk/buy/baritone-ukulele-strings - but Omega are going to offer this as a set up service to make a "Brutulele" on new instruments. I think it's great for beginner ukers like me who like the idea of the bigger sound, but don't want the hassle of learning all of the new chords - but understand the idea for Guitar players moving up to the ukulele.

drbekken
11-20-2012, 11:00 PM
This is an interesting thread, but I think the 'hybrid/not hybrid' discussion is totally futile. If anybody can show me an instrument existing today, other than the human voice, which isn't some sort of 'hybrid', I would be impressed. Instruments today are all results of cross-cultural,historical developement. None are 'purer' than others, in my opinion.

coolkayaker1
11-20-2012, 11:21 PM
If anybody can show me an instrument existing today, other than the human voice, which isn't some sort of 'hybrid', I would be impressed..

My kazoo is not a hybrid.

Phooto
11-21-2012, 12:01 AM
My kazoo is not a hybrid.

45611

I'm sorry, I did already make some kazoo kybrids.

drbekken
11-21-2012, 01:12 AM
My kazoo is not a hybrid.

Oh yes, it is. :-) However, I would suggest that a didgeridoo isn't. From then on, they're all 'hybrids'. As a musician, I do not care very much. I play the instruments I somehow came to love. What matters is the sound, feel and joy of music. Oh yeah.

Ben_H
11-21-2012, 02:06 AM
Oh yes, it is. :-) However, I would suggest that a didgeridoo isn't. From then on, they're all 'hybrids'. As a musician, I do not care very much. I play the instruments I somehow came to love. What matters is the sound, feel and joy of music. Oh yeah.

Feel the Love!

bariukish
11-21-2012, 04:06 AM
Oh yes, it is. :-) However, I would suggest that a didgeridoo isn't. From then on, they're all 'hybrids'. As a musician, I do not care very much. I play the instruments I somehow came to love. What matters is the sound, feel and joy of music. Oh yeah.

I have seen didgeridoos made out of plastic drain pipe that sounded quite good with proper circular breathing. I suspect that by changing the length and diameter of the pipe that one could create a surprano, concert, tenor, or baritone dige.
Wouldn't that make for a fun get-to-gather? :)

drbekken
11-21-2012, 04:09 AM
I have seen didgeridoos made out of plastic drain pipe that sounded quite good with proper circular breathing. I suspect that by changing the length and diameter of the pipe that one could create a surprano, concert, tenor, or baritone dige.
Wouldn't that make for a fun get-to-gather? :)
Wonderful!

Phooto
11-21-2012, 04:22 AM
How about this one? This slides and has chord markings on it, so is in tune. Often our bass line on our Tuesday night jams.
45615

J'Ukebox
11-21-2012, 04:36 AM
Originally Posted by drbekken View Post
As a musician, ... I play the instruments I somehow came to love. What matters is the sound, feel and joy of music. Oh yeah.


This! Precisely!! We all hear & experience sound & other aesthetics of any particular instrument UNIQUELY!!

OldePhart
11-21-2012, 04:49 AM
I've pretty much settled on reentrant DGBE on my baritone and I've discovered something convenient. Often a song that doesn't work for me vocally on a C-tuned uke works using the same shapes on the G-tuned baritone and vice versa.

Also nice, A and E are two very common keys in blues and blues-rock and the G-tuned baritone offers faster-playing chord progressions in both of those keys when compared to a C-tuned uke. After finally settling on a tuning for my baritone I'm beginning to appreciate why drbekken uses baritones so much...now...all I have to do is woodshed for a million years or so and I might be able to play like him!

John

John

OldePhart
11-21-2012, 04:51 AM
45611

I'm sorry, I did already make some kazoo kybrids.

Okay...awesomeness!

Phooto
11-21-2012, 05:06 AM
Okay...awesomeness!
Thanks. But I have no hot water in my house now! :rolleyes:

drbekken
11-21-2012, 05:10 AM
I've pretty much settled on reentrant DGBE on my baritone and I've discovered something convenient. Often a song that doesn't work for me vocally on a C-tuned uke works using the same shapes on the G-tuned baritone and vice versa.

Also nice, A and E are two very common keys in blues and blues-rock and the G-tuned baritone offers faster-playing chord progressions in both of those keys when compared to a C-tuned uke. After finally settling on a tuning for my baritone I'm beginning to appreciate why drbekken uses baritones so much...now...all I have to do is woodshed for a million years or so and I might be able to play like him!

John

John

Thanks for the kind words, John!
The re-entrant baritone tuning (dGBE) is great for me. It brings out a ukulele sound, and it rolls the tenor and the baritone into one - as mentioned. Additionally, I can profit from my thirty-plus years of guitar playing. It becomes easier to remember chords, positions, barre chords etc... I love the soprano (a GCEA tenor is not my thing, and I have never ever tried to play a concert ukulele, incidentally...), but the baritone becomes more versatile for me. Other players may feel totally different. My private little rediscovery of the ukulele has been a miracle, almost. I played the soprano a bit when I was a kid, and forgot about it until about two years ago, when I saw a documentary about the ukulele on TV over here. I swear I didn't even know that baritone ukuleles existed until some time after that....maybe UU helped me discover it...
Anyway, I recommend all uke players to check out the wonderful sound of the baritone. If you for any reason don't like it; that's legitimate, and you can trade or sell it or give it to a friend.

OldePhart
11-21-2012, 05:17 AM
Okay, speaking of hybrid instruments and PVC didgeridoos...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZJNEF6iBNE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZJNEF6iBNE

John

Ben_H
11-21-2012, 05:30 AM
I have seen didgeridoos made out of plastic drain pipe that sounded quite good with proper circular breathing. I suspect that by changing the length and diameter of the pipe that one could create a surprano, concert, tenor, or baritone dige.
Wouldn't that make for a fun get-to-gather? :)

I used to go and see a local pub band called Trip n Stumble. Their percussionist had a didg made from u bends with a large funnel for comic effect at the noisy end which sounded great. He also played a home made theramin with a Zebedee glove puppet but that's another story.

Ben_H
11-21-2012, 05:37 AM
I've pretty much settled on reentrant DGBE on my baritone and I've discovered something convenient. Often a song that doesn't work for me vocally on a C-tuned uke works using the same shapes on the G-tuned baritone and vice versa.

This was one of the reasons I started playing a baritone in the first place as my vocal register is not suited to a lot of soprano music without transposition. Baritone = instant transposition

coolkayaker1
11-21-2012, 08:07 AM
John and DBekken, I want to try re-entrant dGBE on my baritone (I've already tried DGBE and GCEA). Can you throw out a couple brands that specifically make re-entrant bari strings? Danka.

drbekken
11-21-2012, 08:16 AM
Southcoast Heavy Gauge are made for baritones. They come in a totally non-wound set, which I use on my baritone. They are my favorites. Once again, go to my YT channel and look for the video SOUTHCOAST BLUES. That's a re-entrant baritone with the dGBE tuning. After trying those strings, I feel no immediate need to get any other brand in a loooooong time. (For the record, i'm not sponsored or anything. I just LOVE the sound they give my non-descript, inexpensive Richwood baritone ukulele.)

coolkayaker1
11-21-2012, 09:25 AM
Boom, done, DB. Bought exactly what you told me--two sets from SOuthcoast just now. If they sound anything like your Southcoast Blues video, which I have appreciated greatly even before today, then I will be thrilled.

BTW, your SouthCoast Blues video, which I have watched many times since you posted it, is exactly what I like about ukulele...just noodling around, find a pattern that works, then play off it and have it grow. I enjoy doing that, too. You do it expertly. Thank you for the advice. I'm going to have one bari re-entrant dGBE, and keep my other GCEA.

lovinforkful
11-21-2012, 10:24 AM
Ha, I love how the discussion in this thread totally took off!

I did go back Monday and get the Kala KA-B, and at a pretty sweet discount since I used to be a student there. Re-entrant DGBE tuning - not sure on the strings, DG are wound and BE may be Aquilas? I love that it is a guitar sound with better ease of playing (for me). I like busking and I think that I will stand out and be heard a little more with the baritone than my little soprano.

Thanks all!

drbekken
11-21-2012, 11:10 AM
Boom, done, DB. Bought exactly what you told me--two sets from SOuthcoast just now. If they sound anything like your Southcoast Blues video, which I have appreciated greatly even before today, then I will be thrilled.

BTW, your SouthCoast Blues video, which I have watched many times since you posted it, is exactly what I like about ukulele...just noodling around, find a pattern that works, then play off it and have it grow. I enjoy doing that, too. You do it expertly. Thank you for the advice. I'm going to have one bari re-entrant dGBE, and keep my other GCEA.

Thanks for the kind words! Hope you like the strings...good luck with the baritone!!!
I really enjoy to play the kind of improvised fingerpicked noodling you hear in that video. I used to do it on guitar, but I was never happy with the guitar...too big and cumbersome in a way. The baritone ukulele is a wonderful instrument. I'm glad I discovered it.

And yes, lovinforkful, this thread took OFF.
Cool.

itsme
11-21-2012, 11:34 AM
I did go back Monday and get the Kala KA-B, and at a pretty sweet discount since I used to be a student there. Re-entrant DGBE tuning - not sure on the strings, DG are wound and BE may be Aquilas?
Congrats on the new uke! I got my first bari recently (Ohana BK-20) and am loving it.

I've never heard of a wound 4th in a re-entrant set before.

The bari is the only uke I have wound strings on (not re-entrant) and last night I opened the case only find that the G string had come unwound and broke near the tuner end. :(

It came with Guadalupe strings with the fibrecore nylon wound trebles. While they sound great, I just can't get into the tactile feel and have been thinking about changing them. I do have a set of Southcoast plain linears I haven't tried yet, so will put them on when I get a chance.

Will definitely look into the Southcoast Heavy Gauge that drbekken recommended.

mds725
11-21-2012, 11:38 AM
Ken Middleton also sells his Living Water Strings in both re-entrant and linear all non-wound baritone sets.
http://www.kenmiddleton.co.uk/Pages/LWS.aspx

Ben_H
11-21-2012, 11:57 AM
Ken Middleton also sells his Living Water Strings in both re-entrant and linear all non-wound baritone sets.
http://www.kenmiddleton.co.uk/Pages/LWS.aspx

I have tried a set of the Living Water re-entrants and a set of the Southcoast heavies, I find them similar in tone on my Pono MB and both sets are excellent.

coolkayaker1
11-21-2012, 12:52 PM
I posted this earlier in this thread, but in case anyone missed it, Aaron K from Mya Moe demos four bari tunings, including re-entrant:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXvMXx0tWiE

Patrick Madsen
11-21-2012, 02:10 PM
I'm an old guitar player and picked up a baritone recently; tuned to a linear G. I like the extra 5 notes for intros into a run.

I have the bari, two tenors, rentrant Bb and Linear C and a Ubass right where I can reach them. It seems the bari is getting picked first more and more.

There's a Southcoast rentrant d string around here somewhere ....

This has been a good thread.

coolkayaker1
11-21-2012, 03:21 PM
Patrick, linear G is one of the varieties Aaron shows in the video, and I agree w/ you, it sounds nice. Dark and good. I see why you favor it.

I also see that going from re-entrant dGBE to dGBd is only a matter of downtuning the 1st string, like Aaron does...wondering is DrB or others have tried playing that "banjo style" tuning with any success? Sounds good when Aaron does it (as does everything he plays).

drbekken
11-21-2012, 07:28 PM
Patrick, linear G is one of the varieties Aaron shows in the video, and I agree w/ you, it sounds nice. Dark and good. I see why you favor it.

I also see that going from re-entrant dGBE to dGBd is only a matter of downtuning the 1st string, like Aaron does...wondering is DrB or others have tried playing that "banjo style" tuning with any success? Sounds good when Aaron does it (as does everything he plays).

Haven't tried that yet. Maybe I will in a while. Always enjoyed open tunings on the guitar.

Ben_H
11-23-2012, 03:37 AM
Ha, I love how the discussion in this thread totally took off!

Is it me or does the humble ol' baritone seem to be attracting a lot more attention all of a sudden?

coolkayaker1
11-23-2012, 03:48 AM
I remember a thread earlier this year where Mainland Mike said this will likely be the year of the baritone. I scoffed.

Now I own two.

mds725
11-23-2012, 04:37 AM
I remember a thread earlier this year where Mainland Mike said this will likely be the year of the baritone. I scoffed.

Now I own two.

Worth remembering next time you scoff. :) Congratulations on your entry into the baritone universe!

OldePhart
11-23-2012, 04:50 AM
I remember a thread earlier this year where Mainland Mike said this will likely be the year of the baritone. I scoffed.

Now I own two.

Is that how it works!

Quick, somebody tell me this is the year of the Mya Moe concert resonator so I can scoff... :biglaugh:

John

coolkayaker1
12-04-2012, 08:18 PM
I had to resurrect this thread to applaud the suggestion of a few, and specifically the Southcoast Heavy High Tensions as stated by Dr Bekken, for the baritone. Oh my LORD, this is good. On my Pohaku baritone I was using Hilo GCEA, which is familiar and good; I didn't like traditional baritone DGBE. Well, upon suggestions here, and specifically the SOuthcoast Blues video from DrB, I swapped to Southcoast High tensions (Pohaku uses string-through bridges, which is fabulous) re-entrant dGBE and this rocks now! Precisely as stated in Drb's post, it gives me familiarity with the re-entrant (rather than linear) organization of strings (like Aldine said in his video on low G: "I prefer re-entrant high G because, well, having two low notes is just confusing."), and yet it has the bass to move the baritone larger soundboard. Note: I have no idea if I got the dgbe nomenclature right, above.

Thanks so much for the tips. I really am digging the baritone big time now, and as Bill1 said, maybe as the uke popularity phase 3 peaks, more will join in.

One question: I have never had or wanted a radiused fretboard uke (but my Jan 2013 Mya Moe tenor will have one, I know), but for the first time, I;'m thinking it might help on the upper frets (7th upward) barre chords on the baritone. Hmm. Thoughts?

Pippin
12-04-2012, 08:38 PM
In the 1960s, when I first started playing ukulele, the baritone was the most popular uke size-- at least where I lived-- thanks to Arthur Godfrey's influence still being felt. I had a baritone and a soprano back then.

Ben_H
12-04-2012, 10:28 PM
I had to resurrect this thread to applaud the suggestion of a few, and specifically the Southcoast Heavy High Tensions as stated by Dr Bekken, for the baritone. Oh my LORD, this is good. On my Pohaku baritone I was using Hilo GCEA, which is familiar and good; I didn't like traditional baritone DGBE. Well, upon suggestions here, and specifically the SOuthcoast Blues video from DrB, I swapped to Southcoast High tensions (Pohaku uses string-through bridges, which is fabulous) re-entrant dGBE and this rocks now! Precisely as stated in Drb's post, it gives me familiarity with the re-entrant (rather than linear) organization of strings (like Aldine said in his video on low G: "I prefer re-entrant high G because, well, having two low notes is just confusing."), and yet it has the bass to move the baritone larger soundboard. Note: I have no idea if I got the dgbe nomenclature right, above.

Thanks so much for the tips. I really am digging the baritone big time now, and as Bill1 said, maybe as the uke popularity phase 3 peaks, more will join in.

One question: I have never had or wanted a radiused fretboard uke (but my Jan 2013 Mya Moe tenor will have one, I know), but for the first time, I;'m thinking it might help on the upper frets (7th upward) barre chords on the baritone. Hmm. Thoughts?

I have a set of the dGBE Southcoast's to go onto my custom Baritone when it is ready in the Spring.

I'm going to have a radiused fretboard on my 8 string tenor to help with barring.

Patrick Madsen
12-05-2012, 04:54 AM
Radiused fretboards are fantastic IMO. They help a lot for barring chords and working the upper part. I especially like 'em now that the ole hands are getting stiff.

I found the radiused fretboard when I got my Breedlove CM guitar many years ago, in fact it's the first CM made by Breedlove so is a little different than the the others and trustfully is a collectable.

I feel you'll love the radiused fretboard Cool. It really makes a difference.

coolkayaker1
01-23-2013, 11:19 PM
Baritones tuned dGBE are the cat's pajamas!

Why doesn't Koaloha or Kiwaya make a Bari?

OldePhart
01-24-2013, 06:39 AM
Baritones tuned dGBE are the cat's pajamas!

Why doesn't Koaloha or Kiwaya make a Bari?

My suspicion is that until recently there wasn't a lot of call for them and both of those companies can barely keep up with demand for what they do make. The baritone is also getting into guitar territory when it comes to the overall complexity of meeting the requirement to create a light, responsive instrument without having it collapse on itself after a few years. They would have to do a fair amount of research and experimentation to enter the market without jeapordizing their hard-earned reputations.

John

coolkayaker1
01-24-2013, 06:46 AM
Those are excellent points, John.

Conversely, they are companies with great reputations, and they are leaving profits on the table for Kamaka and other competitors. H

What bari's do you own again, John...just the new Pono? (You used to have a uke signature line, I thought, I could be wrong).

OldePhart
01-24-2013, 10:48 AM
Those are excellent points, John.

Conversely, they are companies with great reputations, and they are leaving profits on the table for Kamaka and other competitors. H

What bari's do you own again, John...just the new Pono? (You used to have a uke signature line, I thought, I could be wrong).

Nah, I've never had a uke signature line, I'd have to update it too frequently! LOL

Just the Pono and a Mainland mahogany right now. I have the Mainland set up reentrant with all fluorocarbon strings (yep, Seaguar fishing leaders). The Pono is strung linear G - the three treble strings are the same Seaguar leader as on the Mainland and the wound D is a .035 Thomastik-Infeld flat-wound guitar string. Considering ordering a Mya Moe Koa or Myrtle after UWC, assuming I still have any money left. Honestly, though, I would probably be pretty content with a Pono ABD.

John

pdxuke
01-25-2013, 05:17 PM
As the Aquila strings on my vintage tenor settle in, they slipped down to B tuning from C, and I find I'm enjoying the deeper rich tone, which indicates I'm gonna be a sucker for dGBE Bari tuning. I interviewed Dirk from Southcoast for an episode of UkeChat (which I must resurrect this summer) and that interview is here: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/ukechat/2011/03/26/uke-chat

One thing that is emerging from this thread is folks are finding real dollar value in these instruments: from inexpensive vintage beaters fixed with beads of glue, to pristine $500 Favillas and $1000+ Martins, to lovers of the humble Koloa and Kala all mahogany and even the laminate KB. Put a great pair of strings on it, set it up properly, and Baritone fun.

Do you think Baritones are more forgiving instruments than smaller scales?

Anyway: I want in. My journey will probably eventually lead to a vintage Martin, because that's the kind of crazy Martin freak I am, but while I get there I want in on the cheap.

Oh, what fun it all is!

OldePhart
01-26-2013, 04:20 AM
Do you think Baritones are more forgiving instruments than smaller scales?


In some ways, probably so. The longer scale means that minute differences in scale length or string tension don't affect intonation up the neck to the extent that they do on smaller instruments. Both of my baris are mid-priced instruments and they intonate very well up the neck with a variety of strings. The first fret is significantly further away from the nut then it is on a soprano, so again less tendency to pull sharp if the nut is a bit high. Also, I don't know about others but my pitch-sense varies with octave; I can ear-tune a soprano uke much more readily than one of my basses, for example.

Also, even an inexpensive baritone is going to compare favorably in volume with even quite expensive smaller ukes. I think if I refrained from ever playing a really expensive bari I could probably be quite content with baris in the Mainland to Pono range. I suspect the rub will come if I ever lay hands on a more expensive bari... :)

Although, now that I think about it, I suppose there are probably Mainland or Pono or Ohana baris that are the pick of the litter and every bit as good as far more expensive instruments. That seems to have happened with my Mainland mahogany soprano (it's "better" than my KoAloha) so I suppose it could happen with the bigger ukes, too.

John

coolkayaker1
01-26-2013, 04:48 AM
One thing that is emerging from this thread is folks are finding real dollar value in these instruments: from inexpensive vintage beaters fixed with beads of glue, to pristine $500 Favillas and $1000+ Martins.

Anyway: I want in. My journey will probably eventually lead to a vintage Martin.


I'm a buy vintage cheap and suki-grue the cracks (like a cream cheese schmear on a bagel) type of vintage owner. lol

Your uke chat is awesome!!! It's so cool. And you interviewed Dirk...we've never heard his voice! Thanksfor going off the maintream, to the bubbling and juicy "true underground" of ukuleles with your interview guest choices. Keep it up.

Obviously, if you get a bari, it must be Martin. I have to say, Thom, that the dGBE re-entrant tuning is so freaking fun, just noodling on blues riffs. Front porch, beer in the summer, type stuff.

pdxuke
01-26-2013, 05:35 AM
I'm a buy vintage cheap and suki-grue the cracks (like a cream cheese schmear on a bagel) type of vintage owner. lol

Your uke chat is awesome!!! It's so cool. And you interviewed Dirk...we've never heard his voice! Thanksfor going off the maintream, to the bubbling and juicy "true underground" of ukuleles with your interview guest choices. Keep it up.

Obviously, if you get a bari, it must be Martin. I have to say, Thom, that the dGBE re-entrant tuning is so freaking fun, just noodling on blues riffs. Front porch, beer in the summer, type stuff.

The ukechat was really fun, but blogtalk radio costs like $40 a month, and I wasn't in the mood to fork it out without a sponsor. Heck that's a lot of UAS money! But they offer a 30 day free trial--maybe they'll give it to me again since it was over a year ago and I can get a few more guests in. I'd just do a podcast but I loved the call in and listen live feature. It was fun.

dGBE sounds fun, and since I was a guitar player for 40 years I can pick a bit--not much, but enough so that every family reunion down in Virgilina VA I could keep up with the drunk uncles when we all made music. :-) It would be nice to use that again. And so cool not to have wound strings if I don't want them.

Also--I blush to admit--I've never really learned many of the chord names for uke. I think in the chord shapes, and I still in my head call them by their guitar names! 40 years of knowledge. I am beginning to learn that a D chord is actually a G chord on my uke, but I still kind of think that way. So a barry would be like--welcome home!

Yes, it will be a Martin. I may try and pick up a Favilla or Harmony as well. I've played an old Harmony and it was really cool. And I actually really loved the sound of the Pono, and was shocked at how good this sounds:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiXwYxmU3SY

I can't believe that Koola can be had for <$200. That may hold me until I find that right Martin--and then my son gets a barry present to keep with his tenor!

pdxuke
01-31-2013, 07:44 PM
Ok, a bump on this thread to report that I'm really digging my Kala cheapie, and I have all kinds of strings on order from Dirk, from the dGBE set to the linear C set. I also really like the traditional DGBE sound as well, but don't like the strings that came with the uke because to me the bass sounds muddy. Anybody try Martin barry strings?

And now the problem: if I keep liking all these tunings I'm gonna end up like cowboy with a bunch of baritones!

Ben_H
01-31-2013, 07:58 PM
Ok, a bump on this thread to report that I'm really digging my Kala cheapie, and I have all kinds of strings on order from Dirk, from the dGBE set to the linear C set. I also really like the traditional DGBE sound as well, but don't like the strings that came with the uke because to me the bass sounds muddy. Anybody try Martin barry strings?

And now the problem: if I keep liking all these tunings I'm gonna end up like cowboy with a bunch of baritones!

For DGBE try Living Water Strings, they're non wound and sound wonderful on my Pono. I really couldn't get to grips with wound strings, hated the squeaking and my fingers are too soft.

The Southcoast linear flatwounds in Bb were excellent but I bust a string and haven't got round to replacing it yet as I only have the one baritone currently and thought i would try something else from the string stock.

Patrick Madsen
01-31-2013, 09:01 PM
Had Martin 630's on my bari along with DGBE Living Waters and just put a set of Dirks ML-RW(650) in Bb. Wsn't impressed with the Martins. the living Waters were smooth and clear but thought they lacked a bit in volume and didn't have the tension of a wound string. The Bb's sound good so far and if I want to play in C I just have to put on a capo 2nd fret.

May go back to a linear G tuning if I can find a good string. May have to put the Martins on again for the wound strings.

coolkayaker1
02-01-2013, 01:55 AM
For DGBE try Living Water Strings, they're non wound and sound wonderful on my Pono. I really couldn't get to grips with wound strings, hated the squeaking and my fingers are too soft.

The Southcoast linear flatwounds in Bb were excellent but I bust a string and haven't got round to replacing it yet as I only have the one baritone currently and thought i would try something else from the string stock.

Thom, I got my Favilla 1955 with six inch side crack yesterday. 299 eBay. this thing is the bomb! It's reddish mahogany, and is so minty its silly except for the crack. Its gorgeous. I've already repaired it with thin CA, buffed it with 0000 steel wool, and put a little Tru Oil over it and I have to say, it looks like a giant repaired crack. Lol. But, I really dig this baby with dGBE High tension Southcoasts.

I am and will always be a re-entrant guy. Good luck with the stepping stone Kala.

OldePhart
02-01-2013, 06:34 AM
Had Martin 630's on my bari ... Wsn't impressed with the Martins.
:agree: The 630's underwhelmed me, too. Couldn't get them off fast enough. The aluminum wound string in the set was especially bad. IMHO the balance between the wound and unwound strings was quite poor.


May go back to a linear G tuning if I can find a good string. May have to put the Martins on again for the wound strings.
I am using a set of Seaguar fluorocarbon fishing leaders for the E, B, and G strings and a .035 Thomastik-Infeld flatwound classical guitar string for the wound D. I am very happy with this set so far on my Pono MBD though I'm considering trying a .030 Thomastik-Infeld flatwound D string for the G since I ordered one at the same time that I got the .035. Initially the balance between the wound D and the unwound G seemed a little off, but I quickly learned to adapt my right hand style so now it sounds fine. I really like having the unwound G because I do a lot of pattern picking and for some reason bringing the fingers up against a wound third string is very much noisier than the thumb down on the wound fourth string. I think if one was strictly strumming the wound G would probably be slightly more balanced. Edit: 2/6 - finally got off my rump and tried it - definitely more balanced for strumming and makes right hand technique less critical for pattern picking - the "up-pick" noise is still an issue - I think it's because the finger strikes the string at an oblique angle - but it's nowhere near as bad as with most wound strings.

Here is my baritone "formula" (note, you pretty much have to buy these leaders in 25 meter rolls so this isn't practical unless you have a lot of ukes to care for - the fluorocarbon strings last a long time compared to nylons and wound strings so a roll of leader will probably last a lifetime or more for most folks - although I have one size that gets used on everything from tenor to soprano and I was noticing the other day that it is almost empty).

NoteDiameterLeaderComment
D (high).0319Blue Label 80#
G.0410Premium 130#Tension is a little lower than a wound G string. I had to make a slight adjustment to the truss rod on my Pono because the neck relaxed a little and I had to pull more relief back into the neck. However, I've used the same string on my Mainland (which doesn't have an adjustable truss rod) and experienced no problem.
B.0358Blue Label 90#
E.0319Blue Label 80#Also tried Blue Label 50# and 60# and both intonated poorly up the neck. Even this 80# intonates the most poorly of the set (about 4-cents flat at the 12th on both of my baritones) and it seems to want a higher tension string here even though this same material intonates better (about 2 cents flat) in the lower-tension D position. It's a mystery.


For linear (traditional low-D) tuning the Thomastik-Infeld .035 (classical guitar "A" string) Chrome Steel Flat Wound string (part CF35) makes an excellent D string. It intonates very well and is nowhere near as prone to squeaks and such as most wound strings. It balances quite well with the two treble strings and reasonably well with the unwound G above, though I suspect that some might be happier with a .030 Thom-In D string for the G (haven't tried it yet). Edit 2-6 - have tried it and love it. Definitely better for strumming and even for pattern picking though up-pick noise is a bit of a problem (not as bad as with most wound strings, though).

Another classical guitar string that works well for a low-D with the above Fluorocarbon strings (though it is not as squeak-free) is the D'Addario Pro-Arte heavy tension A string (.036" - J-4405 is the number for the single string). The companion J-4404 .030" D string makes a good G string for those prefering a wound G.

If I were forced to use "ukulele" baritone strings I would probably use the (presumably) Ko'Olau ones that came on my Pono; even though I wasn't especially thrilled with any of them I considered them all usable and the string to string balance was pretty decent.

John

DaleR
02-03-2013, 12:59 PM
My new Kala baritone is sitting at UPS for delivery tomorrow! Those Celtic sessions are going to be a blast and the bari has the keys I need and sound to keep up with the Jones', without just strumming a guitar. Plus, being a tuba player, I did fall in love with the sound when I played one.

coolkayaker1
02-04-2013, 08:54 AM
Baritone selection comment.

Ever notice how players are willing to pony up a tremendous amount of cash for a tenor ukulele ($1000-$2000+ range), yet when it comes to a baritone, even for tried and true bari players, they generally want to spend less than 500 bucks.

Seriously, this plays out every time. The poor bari gets no respect.

Why is that? :D

Ubutunes
02-04-2013, 09:24 AM
Just a few times through this thread and a few others and I was stricken. Kala SMHB now on order from HMS and I think the fever is subsiding. My first bari, heck I haven't played much uke for a few years, having focused on guitar and clawhammer banjo. But I'm greatly looking forward to this... Thanks for, um, encouraging me!
Mike

pdxuke
02-04-2013, 10:18 AM
Baritone selection comment.

Ever notice how players are willing to pony up a tremendous amount of cash for a tenor ukulele ($1000-$2000+ range), yet when it comes to a baritone, even for tried and true bari players, they generally want to spend less than 500 bucks.

Seriously, this plays out every time. The poor bari gets no respect.

Why is that? :D

It could be that Baris are much more forgiving, and so, less expensive ukes sound better than other scales. I find my Kala KB very pleasing, even though it's a cheapie that cost me <$150.

And in the 50s wave of ukes, the most popular scale was baritone. There were a ton produced and so they tend to be available as vintage instruments for less. The exception is a vintage Martin. Not sure how many were produced but they sell at a premium, and are likely worth it.

Today, the spendy one is a Kamaka. But I have to say that if the Kamaka baritone plays anywhere close to how well their tenor plays, it must be mine. I've heard that some prefer Kamaka baris even above Martin (Chuck Fayne is one.)

OldePhart
02-06-2013, 12:57 PM
Just a quick bump because I added some info to post #84 above.

mds725
02-06-2013, 12:59 PM
Thom, I got my Favilla 1955 with six inch side crack yesterday. 299 eBay. this thing is the bomb! It's reddish mahogany, and is so minty its silly except for the crack. Its gorgeous. I've already repaired it with thin CA, buffed it with 0000 steel wool, and put a little Tru Oil over it and I have to say, it looks like a giant repaired crack. Lol. But, I really dig this baby with dGBE High tension Southcoasts.

I am and will always be a re-entrant guy. Good luck with the stepping stone Kala.

What, no photos?

pdxuke
02-13-2013, 05:01 PM
Just a few times through this thread and a few others and I was stricken. Kala SMHB now on order from HMS and I think the fever is subsiding. My first bari, heck I haven't played much uke for a few years, having focused on guitar and clawhammer banjo. But I'm greatly looking forward to this... Thanks for, um, encouraging me!
Mike
OK, I'm very curious about this uke. Of all the modern ukes, I'm most curious about this all mahogany kala tenors and barrys. Years ago MGM told be it was the poor man's modern Martin (of course we all know it CAN'T sound like vintage wood for that kind of money). I have been so darn impressed with the Kala KB that I am really tempted by the SMHB. Always have been. I want to hear all about it!

LifesShort
02-14-2013, 03:37 AM
I ordered a new baritone yesterday. I was torn between the Kala SMHB from HMS and the Koloa from Elderly. I decided to get the Koloa simply because there isn't that much info out there about them. I found a couple of reviews that loved them and a demo on Youtube. The demo sounded great. Also, if it came from Elderly, is should have a decent setup.

I figured if I don't like it, I can always pass it on and get the Kala, or maybe a Pono, or maybe a vintage Harmony, or vintage Favilla.....

coolkayaker1
02-14-2013, 04:51 AM
4880248803488044880548806

Hi, Mark. Pics Favilla circa 1955! I like that the head emblem and inner label look like they were printed yesterday...vivid. Notice, through, that it's fifty years old, so it's been played, and is a player for me, too. Strum marks. Three of the four tuners have been replaced (not by me). It has that ghastly eight inch, lower bout side crack all the way to the waist that looks like the scar from open heart surgery...but a little thin CA and Tru Oil and it's great for me. What I've found recently is that with these vintage instruments--one becomes familiar with them over time. You know, Mark, you've got a couple as I recall. The unique markings make it your instrument...sort of like the carbon in diamonds that one can see with a jeweler's loupe. I'm digging that part of it. Plus that this cost me less than a new Kala bari!

I wonder if all Favilla mahogany baris were red like this. My Favilla soprano picnic uke is not.

Ubutunes
02-14-2013, 07:37 AM
OK, I'm very curious about this uke. Of all the modern ukes, I'm most curious about this all mahogany kala tenors and barrys. Years ago MGM told be it was the poor man's modern Martin (of course we all know it CAN'T sound like vintage wood for that kind of money). I have been so darn impressed with the Kala KB that I am really tempted by the SMHB. Always have been. I want to hear all about it!

I got the uke a few days ago. Have not played it enough to give it a full review, and it still has the stock strings on it (more arrive tomorrow, will be experimenting a bit). That said:

1) it is stunning, the wood is beautiful (could it be sapele and not 'hog, there is lots of striping on the solid top), cleanly and lightly built.

2) the body resonates well, tho I am in EBGD, which as we know from Southcoast is below the bari's resonance. I look forward to the correct strings arriving so I can crank it up to Bb

3) in current tuning and strings it is a little muted, very attuned to fingerpicking, which is what I bought it for. Solid top should open up a bit, but this is not spruce, so I do not expect too much change.

4) the string spacing is fairly wide. as a fingerpicker, that is a good thing. for strummer, barre chord mavens, maybe not so good.

5) did I mention how friggin gorgeous it is? I'll try to get some pics soon, but want them to be good when I post, not cell phone trash...

YMMV!

we tigers
02-14-2013, 08:19 AM
Partly because of Thom's excellent topics on bari's, I'm developing a slight case of bari UAS... I found a Ashbury AU24B for a reasonable price (about 60% discount on the regular price), but I can't find any information about it. Is anybody familiar with this bar, or Ashbury in general? The AU24B is solid rosecherry and looks pretty good. Made in Vietnam.

Too bad it's virtually impossible to pick up a nice vintage uke for a reasonable over here in Europe.

coolkayaker1
02-14-2013, 06:16 PM
Too bad it's virtually impossible to pick up a nice vintage uke for a reasonable over here in Europe.

Hi, WeT. I don;t know about the model you mention--hope someone does so I can learn, too. But, doesn;t Europe have vintage European ukes? I know Bruko in Germany has vointage ukes up on eBay USA sometimes. And there are many other small and respected luthiers--like the English ones--that must have vintage instruments floating around..no?

pdxuke
02-14-2013, 06:18 PM
Hi, WeT. I don;t know about the model you mention--hope someone does so I can learn, too. But, doesn;t Europe have vintage European ukes? I know Bruko in Germany has vointage ukes up on eBay USA sometimes. And there are many other small and respected luthiers--like the English ones--that must have vintage instruments floating around..no?

I agree. Check for Brüko.

This looks like one to me:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/VINTAGE-BARITONE-UKE-UKULELE-SOLID-MAHOGANY-MADE-IN-WEST-GERMANY-NEW-STRINGS-/251173841437?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a7b20aa1d

You're sure to have them in Europe.

pdxuke
02-14-2013, 06:21 PM
4880248803488044880548806

Hi, Mark. Pics Favilla circa 1955! I like that the head emblem and inner label look like they were printed yesterday...vivid. Notice, through, that it's fifty years old, so it's been played, and is a player for me, too. Strum marks. Three of the four tuners have been replaced (not by me). It has that ghastly eight inch, lower bout side crack all the way to the waist that looks like the scar from open heart surgery...but a little thin CA and Tru Oil and it's great for me. What I've found recently is that with these vintage instruments--one becomes familiar with them over time. You know, Mark, you've got a couple as I recall. The unique markings make it your instrument...sort of like the carbon in diamonds that one can see with a jeweler's loupe. I'm digging that part of it. Plus that this cost me less than a new Kala bari!

I wonder if all Favilla mahogany baris were red like this. My Favilla soprano picnic uke is not.

Just got mine today, Steve. Does not seem overly red. Red-ish, I'd say.

coolkayaker1
02-14-2013, 06:42 PM
Just got mine today, Steve. Does not seem overly red. Red-ish, I'd say.

Gotcha. My soprano is not reddish either. My bari's probably a fake then.

pdxuke
02-14-2013, 07:05 PM
Gotcha. My soprano is not reddish either. My bari's probably a fake then.

Haha. Unlikely! Probably just a different finish used, different time period, or at worst an overspray or some sort of finish touch up. My guess tho, is the former.

Patrick Madsen
02-14-2013, 07:16 PM
I doubt it's a fake Cool. Favs, are known for that wonderful reddish finish. You're lucky to find one with it. It's one of the things I'm looking for in my next favilla bari.

pdxuke
02-14-2013, 07:23 PM
I doubt it's a fake Cool. Favs, are known for that wonderful reddish finish. You're lucky to find one with it. It's one of the things I'm looking for in my next favilla bari.

See Steve? It's supposed to be red.

And now Pat, you need to feed my barry obsession: your NEXT Favilla? how many do you have?

Oh--and tell me how you like that Martin Barry!

Patrick Madsen
02-14-2013, 07:52 PM
I don't have a Favilla yet but would like to find one. I feel they are probably one of the best deals out there. I'm looking and waiting for that special one to show up. Preferably with it's untouched reddish hue. I wish their necks was just a little slimmer like a Martin. But man, the ones I've played sound really good. Would also like to find an old Vega bari.; another well built instrument for a good price.

I love that Martin bari. The neck and low action has spoiled me. I'd like to find another but am leaning more towards a Favilla for a different tuning and it's cheaper price. I can always shave the neck down a bit if it needs it.

pdxuke
02-14-2013, 08:30 PM
I don't have a Favilla yet but would like to find one. I feel they are probably one of the best deals out there. I'm looking and waiting for that special one to show up. Preferably with it's untouched reddish hue. I wish their necks was just a little slimmer like a Martin. But man, the ones I've played sound really good. Would also like to find an old Vega bari.; another well built instrument for a good price.

I love that Martin bari. The neck and low action has spoiled me. I'd like to find another but am leaning more towards a Favilla for a different tuning and it's cheaper price. I can always shave the neck down a bit if it needs it.

Don't know if you've seen the Favilla I just got-- click on my sig for pics. Action is low, and neck is chunkier than a Martin but it's a great uke. I know what you mean about the Martin necks being oh so comfortable. The Tenor I have is that way, as is the Barry I played a few years ago, which I should have bought, because I'll never see THAT price again!

Do you mean that Arthur Godfrey vega uke?

Patrick Madsen
02-14-2013, 08:47 PM
I saw your photos which is making that bari UAS kick in. I go on Ebay just to check out and see if there's one like it there. I thought Vega put one out under their name. The Arthur Godfrey Vega Deluxe in incredible. The standard AG is just so-so. You got a good deal on your F.; no doubt about it. I'm sure in the coming months, the Favs. will be more costly.

coolkayaker1
02-15-2013, 05:02 AM
Patrick, you are right about the thick neck on the Favilla Bari. It really feels different coming from the perky and slender Martin soprano. My Bruko baritone has a thick neck, but not as thick as this Favilla. I guess it's the guitar=maker influence in Favilla. Yep, you know much about baris, and when you find that mint cherry Favilla, do post photos and scribe on this Bari UAS thread wso we can all see it (most of us can't do click signatures like Thom--he's a computer wizard, I guess). Thanks for your input on color, P.

That Favilla looks superb, Thom. It is older than mine, I think, right? That branded interior logo seems to reek of vintage authenticity. Mine said 1955, right in same spot as yours, but yours just seems more vintage, for some reason. It's a stunner, for sure. Now you have two baris, I think--Kala and Favilla. Great! (ps I did send you an email last night, hope you got it, T).

I'd be interested to hear what soupard, Scott, has to say about his Koloa. Please post photos and thought, soup. I've never seen on of those. Thanks.

pdxuke
02-15-2013, 05:31 AM
Patrick, you are right about the thick neck on the Favilla Bari. It really feels different coming from the perky and slender Martin soprano. My Bruko baritone has a thick neck, but not as thick as this Favilla. I guess it's the guitar=maker influence in Favilla. Yep, you know much about baris, and when you find that mint cherry Favilla, do post photos and scribe on this Bari UAS thread wso we can all see it (most of us can't do click signatures like Thom--he's a computer wizard, I guess). Thanks for your input on color, P.

That Favilla looks superb, Thom. It is older than mine, I think, right? That branded interior logo seems to reek of vintage authenticity. Mine said 1955, right in same spot as yours, but yours just seems more vintage, for some reason. It's a stunner, for sure. Now you have two baris, I think--Kala and Favilla. Great! (ps I did send you an email last night, hope you got it, T).

I'd be interested to hear what soupard, Scott, has to say about his Koloa. Please post photos and thought, soup. I've never seen on of those. Thanks.

Based on what Tom Favilla said, we pretty much peg this at between '54 and '59. Tom said the paper labels came on line in about 1960, so yours would be 60s's to 80s, I think.

I have four barry's now, haha, but only three in hand. I have a '69 Silvertone that's all mahogany. I have south coast linear set on that, CGEA. Lovely. Action needs to be adjusted, too high, probably at the nut. I have a spruce top Regal in transit. I will string that differently. I have the Kala strung with Lambchop's D'Addario method, or dGBE. Action is great. And then the Favilla, which Jack strung with Martin's, DGBE. I actually like the Martin strings. Action is low and slinky. Just great.

What I'm learning that other Barry players already know, is that stringing it differently and using alternate tunings makes a HUGE difference in what that instrument sounds like. My Silvertone strung CGEA sounds like a STEROID TENOR, haha. So, I'm a believer in the more-than-one-Barry-school, unless you've found a tuning and strings that you only want to play.

LifesShort
02-15-2013, 07:15 AM
I'd be interested to hear what soupard, Scott, has to say about his Koloa. Please post photos and thought, soup. I've never seen on of those. Thanks.

I'll be glad to tell you all about it once it gets here. I should have it Monday or Tuesday. I'm going to start off with DGBE tuning and see how it sounds. I'm sure I'll get some Southcoast strings at some point and tune it Bb.

pdxuke
02-15-2013, 07:16 AM
I'll be glad to tell you all about it once it gets here. I should have it Monday or Tuesday. I'm going to start off with DGBE tuning and see how it sounds. I'm sure I'll get some Southcoast strings at some point and tune it Bb.

Hey Scott, I've had my eye on the Barry as well. Heard good things about it.

Which set from Southcoast tunes it to Bb?

Patrick Madsen
02-15-2013, 08:34 AM
Southcoast ML-RW for a linear tuned Bb bari. I've got my Martin tuned to a Bb with SC and really like it.

coolkayaker1
02-18-2013, 06:34 PM
Hey, Scott, while we await your fine Koloa and review of it, here's one to wet everyone's whistle.

http://www.gryphonstrings.com/instpix/39879/index.php

Spearmint? Peppermint? All I know is that it's mint!

pdxuke
02-18-2013, 06:43 PM
Hey, Scott, while we await your fine Koloa and review of it, here's one to wet everyone's whistle.

http://www.gryphonstrings.com/instpix/39879/index.php

Spearmint? Peppermint? All I know is that it's mint!

I really like the look of that. I keep going back to gaze at it, but I'm not sure how much I'll like a spruce top. I have that spruce Regal on the way, so we'll see. In the mean time, from the Tiki-King:

"Made by Harmony, circa late 50's, possibly early 60's. Airline was the "house brand" of Montgomery Wards. The airline name appeared on guitars built by Valco for Wards of the same period, so it is a pretty safe bet that the Ukuleles were built by Valco also. In the 1960's, the Valco company made Guitars under the names National, Supro, Airline, and Oahu"

So many cool vintage Barrys out there...
"

we tigers
02-18-2013, 07:13 PM
Wow! That's a beautiful Bari!
Nowadays Eastwood guitars makes guitars using the Airline name. Chinese built, but cool designs.

d-mace
02-23-2013, 07:23 PM
Thom, Steve, et. all, I just bought a Favilla bari and the fret marker is on the 9th fret (like a guitar) instead of the 10th. It keeps throwing me off. My previous baritones old and new were marked at the 10th. I know you two recently bought Favillas also and I was wondering if yours were marked at the 9th fret also?

coolkayaker1
02-23-2013, 07:39 PM
David, hi. My Fav Bari has the fret marker on 9, too. Hmm.

d-mace
02-23-2013, 07:41 PM
David, hi. My Fav Bari has the fret marker on 9, too. Hmm.

Thanks Steve...just wanted to make sure I didn't get a factory second :)

coolkayaker1
02-23-2013, 07:54 PM
Thanks Steve...just wanted to make sure I didn't get a factory second :)

didnt they put them on 9 up o/after some date, and otherwise used 10. anyone?

Dan Uke
03-03-2013, 06:37 AM
After reading all these recent threads about baris, I succumbed to the perceived peer pressure and got a Pono second.

pdxuke
03-03-2013, 06:52 AM
After reading all these recent threads about baris, I succumbed to the perceived peer pressure and got a Pono second.

Excellent. Where did you find it?

SweetWaterBlue
03-03-2013, 07:18 AM
Baris are dangerous instruments. They are gateway instruments that lead to a lust for lower, stronger bass tones. In my search for more bass, I tried a few baris a few years ago. That lead to an acoustic guitar to replace my aging classical guitar. A few weeks ago, I hit rock bottom (scale wise) and got an Ashbory bass. I replaced the strings with the Pahoehoes that come on the Ubass and am loving it. I haven't been able to put it down and play the uke since.

Dan Uke
03-03-2013, 07:23 AM
Excellent. Where did you find it?

I was in correspondance with some guy from FMM for another uke and he also said he had the pono for sale but unlisted. A couple of months past and I emailed him yesterday and he still had it so I picked it up. It will probably be temporary cuz if I like baris, I'm gonna get a really nice one and don't need two and if I don't like, I'll sell it and stick with tenors.

coolkayaker1
03-03-2013, 08:03 AM
You'll like it, Daniel. You're a picky son-of-a-gun, but you'll like it. Lol.

( deep like...not love...just like).

Dan Uke
03-03-2013, 12:40 PM
You'll like it, Daniel. You're a picky son-of-a-gun, but you'll like it. Lol.

( deep like...not love...just like).

I became exponentially pickier after getting a MBU and coming back from Hawaii. :p

However, Pono is such a good deal, I just had to try it.

pdxuke
03-03-2013, 01:22 PM
I became exponentially pickier after getting a MBU and coming back from Hawaii. :p

However, Pono is such a good deal, I just had to try it.

I know what you mean; I missed the Pono baritone in the marketplace by hours. I would like to have areally nice, modern instrument to compliment the vintage baritones I have. The laminates are fine, but a really nice solid wood, well built, would be ideal. My short list is:

Kamaka (I really like the builds of the last few years)
Pono (I've never played one. Wish I could try before I buy. Maybe I need a trip to Hawaii! :-)
... and if Martin ever decides to make a modern baritone!

NewKid
03-04-2013, 02:45 AM
Why don't you just commission a modern Martin Baritone from the Martin Custom Shop or through Elderly Instruments? Anything is possible in this great country of ours. If you don't like it I'll buy it from you next year. Don

Ben_H
03-04-2013, 08:31 AM
I was in correspondance with some guy from FMM for another uke and he also said he had the pono for sale but unlisted. A couple of months past and I emailed him yesterday and he still had it so I picked it up. It will probably be temporary cuz if I like baris, I'm gonna get a really nice one and don't need two and if I don't like, I'll sell it and stick with tenors.


You need two, trust me!

One re-entrant tuning and one linear.
You could possibly have a third tuned Bb with Southcoast Linears and maybe even a fourth as a Cuatro with Low 1st and 4th strings

Dan Uke
03-04-2013, 08:37 AM
You need two, trust me!

One re-entrant tuning and one linear.
You could possibly have a third tuned Bb with Southcoast Linears and maybe even a fourth as a Cuatro with Low 1st and 4th strings

Do you have more listed since I only see only 1 bari under your sig.

Nah, I won't need more than one as I'm a tenor player. I purchased linear SC and tuned to Bb but might tune it down to A. Still debating if I like the sound...either way, I don't think this will be with me very long. If I like baris, I'm gonna splurge and get a custom.

Macmuse
03-04-2013, 09:26 AM
Hmmm, I'm going to have to keep my eye on the marketplace for baritones then. ;)

OldePhart
03-04-2013, 12:11 PM
Do you have more listed since I only see only 1 bari under your sig.

Nah, I won't need more than one as I'm a tenor player. I purchased linear SC and tuned to Bb but might tune it down to A. Still debating if I like the sound...either way, I don't think this will be with me very long. If I like baris, I'm gonna splurge and get a custom.

If that Pono is an ABD give me a shout should you decide to unload it... :)

John

Dan Uke
03-04-2013, 12:47 PM
If that Pono is an ABD give me a shout should you decide to unload it... :)

John

Just a MB...If I sell it, I'm gonna try to sell locally first as it seems cost prohibitive with cheaper bari ukes. The uke is so large that shipping will probably be $20 more than a tenor. (just guessing)

Ben_H
03-04-2013, 08:01 PM
Do you have more listed since I only see only 1 bari under your sig.

Nah, I won't need more than one as I'm a tenor player. I purchased linear SC and tuned to Bb but might tune it down to A. Still debating if I like the sound...either way, I don't think this will be with me very long. If I like baris, I'm gonna splurge and get a custom.

I have a spruce top, cherry back and sides, Tinguitar baritone, (his first), on the way and I'm now allowing myself to get moderately excited as it is only 6 weeks away from completion and collection.

I'd love an 8 string bari too but finance dictates one at a time :)


Seriously though, if you find you like playing them you may well feel the need for a second for the high v low 4th string option. I was being slightly tongue in cheek about the others, though I forgot to add a 5th, beater uke to leave in the car along with my dolphin.

I'm really enjoying playing slack key style with the low D at the moment but also want to be playing stuff that just sounds better with high d. That's without even thinking about thrashing along with my uke group.

pdxuke
03-04-2013, 08:24 PM
I have a spruce top, cherry back and sides, Tinguitar baritone, (his first), on the way and I'm now allowing myself to get moderately excited as it is only 6 weeks away from completion and collection.

I'd love an 8 string bari too but finance dictates one at a time :)


Seriously though, if you find you like playing them you may well feel the need for a second for the high v low 4th string option. I was being slightly tongue in cheek about the others, though I forgot to add a 5th, beater uke to leave in the car along with my dolphin.

I'm really enjoying playing slack key style with the low D at the moment but also want to be playing stuff that just sounds better with high d. That's without even thinking about thrashing along with my uke group.

I'll soon have six (!) Barrys and most will be tuned differently. :o

coolkayaker1
03-05-2013, 02:04 AM
I'll soon have six (!) Barrys and most will be tuned differently. :o
I remember the old days when pdxuke had no baritones.

I think it was approximately two months ago.:rolleyes:

pdxuke
03-05-2013, 04:05 AM
I remember the old days when pdxuke had no baritones.

I think it was approximately two months ago.:rolleyes:

Haha, yes I think you're right, Steve. But as I've said before, I'm old and don't have much time. Can't let the grass grow under foot!:old:

pdxuke
03-13-2013, 05:18 PM
http://www.theukulelesite.com/pono-rbc-rosewood-baritone-cutaway-spruce-top.html

So ever since I saw Benny Chong's video of his Kamaka custom spruce top Mr. Barry Tone, I've been jonesing for a really nice spruce top. I came across this and it really sounds nice on the vid, but one never knows from a viddy.

Anybody got one? Care to comment? I know Ponos are highly regarded here, so perhaps someone has one of these they'd like to tell me about?

Macmuse
03-14-2013, 07:55 AM
http://www.theukulelesite.com/pono-rbc-rosewood-baritone-cutaway-spruce-top.html

So ever since I saw Benny Chong's video of his Kamaka custom spruce top Mr. Barry Tone, I've been jonesing for a really nice spruce top. I came across this and it really sounds nice on the vid, but one never knows from a viddy.

Anybody got one? Care to comment? I know Ponos are highly regarded here, so perhaps someone has one of these they'd like to tell me about?

In general, I'd agree that firsthand reports are quite useful to inform our acquisitions going on around here. ;)

However, I think Andrew and crew at HMS are very considered and careful about their postings with the sound clips. All that we've zeroed in on and made the jump to buy have sounded remarkably close or spot on to the videos they post of the instruments. Random youtube, etc. is definitely hit-or-miss due to sound quality, recording equipment, and so forth. But the HMS sound clips in large part are very representative of the instruments.

Just a side note: They are doing some really interesting comparison videos as well http://theukulelereview.com/2013/03/12/hms-listening-booth-3-hawaiian-tenors/#comment-963

It's tenors right now but, perhaps we could encourage them to do comparisons of tonewoods for baritones sometime in the future.

TheCraftedCow
03-14-2013, 10:45 PM
A baritone at the fifth fret is the same as a GCEA tuned ukulele. There are some people who only know that a C chord on a soprano ukulele is 0-0-0-3. They do not know it can also be played as 5-4-3-3. It can also be played as 5-7-8-7.

Some guitar players never come above the 5th fret. "Ain't no money above the 5th fret"for some who play a particular style of music. There are some ukulele players with that same mind set.

Far better it is to dare glorious dreams;though the way be checkered with defeat, than to take rank with those poor souls who neither enjoy much, nor suffer much for they live in a grey twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat. (TRoosevelt)

To those who are reluctant to learn anything more than one chord shape on the neck, going up or down is like learning a foreign language. If one thinks they cannot do it, that is the right answer. If one thinks they can do it, that also is the right answer. A tenor tuned dGBE has closer intervals on the first five frets, and still has that fuller, richer sound because of the volume of the body being bigger than a soprano or concert, but you may think it lacks the sound of a baritone, and will only be satisfied with at least one. Enjoy the journey of discovering what you like.

Go to Southcoast Ukulele's site and listen to cuatro tuning. That works on sopranos-concerts-tenors- as well as baritones.

The real truth of the matter is that it does not matter what others think. Life is a matter of trade-offs. What am I willing to give up, for what I am wanting to get?

edgar44
05-23-2013, 04:22 AM
And what's wonderful about learning chords on the Baritone Ukulele is that you could then play a tenor banjo tuned in the 'Chicago style' tuning of DGBE. Just thought you'd like to know.

mds725
05-23-2013, 05:24 AM
And what's wonderful about learning chords on the Baritone Ukulele is that you could then play a tenor banjo tuned in the 'Chicago style' tuning of DGBE. Just thought you'd like to know.

I have a tenor guitar (which evolved from the tenor banjo) tuned DGBE for that very reason. :)

UkeKiddinMe
05-23-2013, 03:21 PM
I'm going to catch up with all of you. There are definitely more awesome baris in my future.

tejastani
05-23-2013, 04:59 PM
Absolutely correct about the tuning.
But there is NOTHING WRONG OR LAZY with other tunings as long as you know you are playing a really big tenor (or concert or soprano).
But you are NOT playing a BARITONE ukulele - you are using your baritone to be something else.

I love my baritone and tune it as was intended. I use it as a brain test and often enjoy jumping from bari to tenor when playing the same songs. Tests the brain and the fingers.

"Intended?" Play music! The instrument is an illusion...

NewKid
05-29-2013, 09:56 PM
"Intended?" Play music! The instrument is an illusion...

Amen, brother! But I do have ten beautiful illusions...and still dreaming of an MBU.