PDA

View Full Version : Head Keeps Tipping Down, Please Help



banpreso
11-28-2012, 10:33 PM
Hi, guitar player transitioning to uke here. I am currently playing a soprano uke, and I notice during certain chord changes, when I need to lift up my left hand clear off the fretboard, the neck of the uke would tip down, making the chord change really difficult. I mean when I'm playing a guitar, the guitar is snugly secured between my knee and my right arm, so my left hand is free to do whatever, but the uke's small size makes the guitar playing position not possible. When holding the uke, I'm supporting part of the weight of the uke's neck with my left hand, but sometimes I need to take my left hand completely off the uke for certain chord changes and the neck would tip down.

Does anyone else have this problem? Am I doing something wrong?

Thanks

coolkayaker1
11-29-2012, 01:50 AM
Www.ukeleash.com

Your problem is usual. Even Jake S. began to use a strap within the last two years. One solution above link. Another is a traditional strap with endpins.

Uke hard, and welcome to the world of the " toy guitar".

banpreso
11-29-2012, 11:37 AM
Ahh I see, thanks for the help. It's not a pretty solution but it'll have to do.

strumsilly
11-29-2012, 12:23 PM
since the ukes are relatively light, find a guitar strap an overkill. for my bari, I use a mando strap, for my tenors , I use a long shoestring. this does require and endpin, which cost about $2 and are easy to install.

OldePhart
11-29-2012, 12:26 PM
I have a problem with my head tipping down, too - but usually a good night's sleep cures it for a while... :)

Seriously, though, if you don't like straps consider non-skid shelf liner fastened to the back with spray trim adhesive. Makes the uke "stick" to your shirt and works well for me.

John

Harold O.
11-29-2012, 05:05 PM
Some guitar players make the mistake of strumming a ukulele over the sound hole. This means that they are not holding the uke against their body with their right arm.

Done 'correctly', your right forearm should press against the uke's body and your strumming should be done where the neck meets the body. You strum with a wrist twist instead of an arm motion (as you do with a guitar). The neck/body connection also happens to be right about the middle of the string. Funny how that works.

I don't always strap my uke
But when I do
I use a Uke Leash
Strum well, my friends

banpreso
11-29-2012, 08:07 PM
Thanks guys, I have an order of uke leash on the way as we speak. I really would like to stay away from modifying the uke in any way, I like the old wood and nylon just the way it is:drool:

Louis0815
11-30-2012, 12:15 AM
As Harold said: a soprano should basically stay in the correct position without your left hand even touching the instrument - but in fact that depends a bit on the uke and your clothing. (No shirt usually works best :p)

A good alternative to endpins are magnetic straps; no need for body modifications, but still properly holding the uke. (I have one on my Flea)

Pukulele Pete
11-30-2012, 12:45 AM
I don't always strap my uke
But when I do
I use a Uke Leash
Strum well, my friends

Good one .

Cooper Black
11-30-2012, 12:51 AM
Some guitar players make the mistake of strumming a ukulele over the sound hole. This means that they are not holding the uke against their body with their right arm.

This is where I have ended up 9 mos into playing ukulele (long time guitarist). I'm mostly using my thumb to strum up around the neck joint, using my fingers to support the upper bout of the instrument. This is not just about supporting the neck, the tone is all-around better this way.

I still use PIMA fingering and alternate index-thumb picking for some single note passages, but my thumb is really coming up to speed and seems to be the clear winner.

I've also found that my left hand position is slightly different than I would use for guitar, angled a bit as you might do playing mandolin, allowing for long reaches up the neck.

Harold O.
12-01-2012, 05:23 AM
I've also found that my left hand position is slightly different than I would use for guitar, angled a bit as you might do playing mandolin, allowing for long reaches up the neck.

The ukulele is obviously a different instrument than a guitar. Some techniques will translate, others will not. We all make adjustments.

With the Uke Leash, I don't wrap it around my opposite shoulder like so many others. I play right handed, so one end of the leash goes around the headstock, the other is over my left shoulder and loops around my belt, above my left back pocket. When I set the uke down, I can unhook the headstock and tuck the leash into my back pocket until ready to use again.