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Barbablanca
12-11-2012, 12:35 PM
Anyone had their hands on this book (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Johnson-Ukulele-Leonard-Publishing-Corporation/dp/1458459659/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355268658&sr=1-1)?

It's got the same photo on the cover and the same sepia tint as the "RJ for Guitar" published recently and considered difficult, but definitive. But that says nothing, because there aren't that many photos considered authentic of the author of Come on in my Kitchen....

So, anyone actually held it in their hands and thought of heading down to the Crossroads with it? ;)

Newportlocal
12-11-2012, 12:47 PM
Wow,that is cool!

coolkayaker1
12-11-2012, 01:04 PM
Now THAT would be a Book I'd buy.

webby
12-11-2012, 01:06 PM
I just don't get the RJ thing, and white middle class folks in 2012 shouldn't be singing about how hard it is working in the cotton field BECAUSE THEY DON"T WORK IN THE COTTON FIELDS - It's a complete travesty - like the house of blues.

coolkayaker1
12-11-2012, 01:08 PM
In fact, it's on US AMazon for $12.23, so I just did. I love those songs, and have CDs from Allman Bros to Clapton to other bluesman covering RJ. Plus, somewhere here (digs around in CD box) I have the complete Johnson box set. Thanks you, B, for mentioning this. Very much.

Webby, I sing about the working poor in homage to those that built this country, and in respect to their original tunes, not because I am one of them.

I'm not Chubby Checker, Elton John or Thelonius Monk, either, but I savage their original tunes just as brutally.

jwieties
12-11-2012, 01:31 PM
I just got it last night. It's excellent. Believable renditions of some incredible music. The ukulele translates these songs well. One observation is that many of these songs are in the same key and have a similar structure. That's good and bad. Once you learn some of the riffs, many of the songs sound very similar, but you do quickly learn a lot of songs and you really get to explore a couple keys in detail. You do have to be familiar with the music. There are songs were the notes are sparse and it is all about syncopation, timing and feel.

Definitely recommend.

Newportlocal
12-11-2012, 01:43 PM
I just don't get the RJ thing, and white middle class folks in 2012 shouldn't be singing about how hard it is working in the cotton field BECAUSE THEY DON"T WORK IN THE COTTON FIELDS - It's a complete travesty - like the house of blues.

Ummm... Because guys like Robert Johnson,Blind Willie Johnson, Howlin Wolf,leadbelly,muddy waters,John Lee Hooker, etc. were part of the core of what makes most music what it is. For example,howlin wolf and the rolling stones.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILFjY2mbarg&feature=youtube_gdata_player

jwieties
12-11-2012, 01:43 PM
I just don't get the RJ thing, and white middle class folks in 2012 shouldn't be singing about how hard it is working in the cotton field BECAUSE THEY DON"T WORK IN THE COTTON FIELDS - It's a complete travesty - like the house of blues.

To each his own, but the blues has nothing to do with working the cotton fields. It has to do with embracing your adversity and finding away to celebrate it. Not sure what kind of music you listen to, but if it is anything even remotely pop from over the past 60 years, chances are it is heavily influenced by this music. Wouldn't be to hard to make a direct connection to Jake S, easy to see the influence in the music of James Hill.

I see where you are coming from Webby. Nothing worse then a poser, but this is just music that makes a lot of sense to me and I think really transcends issues of culture, race and time.

Ben_H
12-11-2012, 07:46 PM
It's on my Xmas list so no, not yet!


Anyone had their hands on this book (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Johnson-Ukulele-Leonard-Publishing-Corporation/dp/1458459659/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355268658&sr=1-1)?

It's got the same photo on the cover and the same sepia tint as the "RJ for Guitar" published recently and considered difficult, but definitive. But that says nothing, because there aren't that many photos considered authentic of the author of Come on in my Kitchen....

So, anyone actually held it in their hands and thought of heading down to the Crossroads with it? ;)

didgeridoo2
12-11-2012, 07:58 PM
I just got it last night. It's excellent. Believable renditions of some incredible music. The ukulele translates these songs well. One observation is that many of these songs are in the same key and have a similar structure. That's good and bad. Once you learn some of the riffs, many of the songs sound very similar, but you do quickly learn a lot of songs and you really get to explore a couple keys in detail. You do have to be familiar with the music. There are songs were the notes are sparse and it is all about syncopation, timing and feel.

Definitely recommend.
Good point about knowing the syncopation. I've had it for a while and haven't gotten around to focusing on it, except the first song or so. Looking forward to getting into it when I have a little more time.

Barbablanca
12-11-2012, 11:26 PM
I don't know a single blues about working in the cotton fields. ;)

RJ's songs are largely about his relationship with women and his feelings of existential angst - they are two themes which have not changed all that much (in their essence) since the thirties. And, as has been said above, the Blues is the grandfather of ROCK! - I cam to manhood to the tunes of Cream, Fleetwood Mac and later Led Zeppelin, etc.

I think I'll take the plunge! Thanks for the advice guys!

Pukulele Pete
12-12-2012, 12:19 AM
:drool:
I just don't get the RJ thing, and white middle class folks in 2012 shouldn't be singing about how hard it is working in the cotton field BECAUSE THEY DON"T WORK IN THE COTTON FIELDS - It's a complete travesty - like the house of blues.
Right , and for now on no one should play "fly me to the moon" unless they are actually flying to the moon. ;)

Luke El U
12-12-2012, 03:09 AM
IMHO, A reading of Leroi Jones' (Amiri Baraka's) book "Blues People" might shed some light on webby's comments.
Classic blues are wonderful to listen to and interesting to study. But anybody in the 21st century posing as an
early-mid 20th century African-American blues musician would look and sound quite naive.

drbekken
12-12-2012, 04:11 AM
I just don't get the RJ thing, and white middle class folks in 2012 shouldn't be singing about how hard it is working in the cotton field BECAUSE THEY DON"T WORK IN THE COTTON FIELDS - It's a complete travesty - like the house of blues.

I most definitely see your point, but then you don't have to be a white Austrian to play Mozart either, thank God.

Plainsong
12-12-2012, 10:02 AM
I most definitely see your point, but then you don't have to be a white Austrian to play Mozart either, thank God.

Yes, and everyone's definition of poser is different. Is a poser one who plays badly, plays well, or plays at all? You'd limit yourself terribly if avoiding anything modern that wasn't blues influenced. Hope you like atonal!

Kimosabe
12-12-2012, 10:17 AM
I worked in the fields but I'm not black. Can I play the blues? Eine kleine cottonfield musik, anyone?

Barbablanca
12-12-2012, 10:26 AM
"Can blue men sing the whites?" as Bonzo Dog famously sang ;)

Well, I have just ordered a copy new from another store for about $7 :)

AnnaUK
12-12-2012, 10:48 AM
My copy arrived today. I've only had a quick flick through, but it looks very comprehensive and suitably difficult (not a bad thing). I will most likely have an attempt at some of the arrangements over the weekend, so I'll let you know how I get on.

:)

Kimosabe
12-12-2012, 12:35 PM
What would be really nice for us wannabe cottonpickers is for someone good to make a video of the song exactly as it is tabbed so that we can get the syncopation down.

I imagine it's not exactly as RJ played it after he sold his soul to the devil.

There's a real nice ap called The Amazing Slower Downer. You can put in a song or a video of a song and it slows it down as much as you want yet keeps it in the same key. It's only $50. Google it.

It's interesting that way back then, RJ was eating tamales. Texas born.

Tamales aren't always thought of as soul food, even if they're red hot.

Must have been some mixing of the cultures.

PedalFreak
12-12-2012, 01:15 PM
We had one in our store. Really liked it!

Plainsong
12-12-2012, 03:17 PM
I worked in the fields but I'm not black. Can I play the blues? Eine kleine cottonfield musik, anyone?

Great. That made me laugh out loud. At 4am.

If Webby hadn't set that up, we wouldn't get this wonderful punch line.

There is such a thing as a poser though, and I get Webby's frustration. I just don't know if I can quantify who that poser is? Maybe it's the self-absorbed, entitled, rich suburban white kid who only thinks they know what adversity is. But, what if said white kid has some serious chops playing the blues? What if the hands and ears get it even if the brain really doesn't? Still a poser then? Tough to say, but maybe we just know it when we see it.

cletus
12-12-2012, 03:49 PM
Tamales aren't always thought of as soul food, even if they're red hot.

A personal favorite:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cg8CumKjXno

:drool::cheers:

konut
12-12-2012, 04:04 PM
"The blues isn't about feelin' better. It's about makin' other people feel worse and makin' a few bucks while you're at it." Bleeding Gums Murphy

Ben_H
12-12-2012, 09:16 PM
"Can blue men sing the whites?" as Bonzo Dog famously sang ;)



I think they're all hypocrites! ;)

kauaijim
12-12-2012, 11:14 PM
Check out "The Search for Robert Johnson" on DVD. Interesting connections between the book under discussion and some of the people identified in the film. The history of the original recordings of blues and the music of the South is fascinating. There was a lot of cross over between musicians in these groups as there was in jazz during the same period. Listen to Fred McDowell singing Amazing Grace.

~dave~~wave~
12-13-2012, 03:35 AM
Eric Clapton played a smoking power trio version of Crossroads last night at 12-12-12, reminded me of the old Cream days.

This is the tune that turned me and a whole generation on to Robert Johnson.

Excerpt here: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=50136950n

The Big Kahuna
12-13-2012, 07:42 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfH_bikDZS4

'nuff said (and Ry Cooder is white too)

Markr1
12-13-2012, 09:06 PM
I just bought mine and looking forward to getting it. I love the DVD of Clapton I have of the Sessions for RJ that Clapton did a couple of years ago. If you haven't seen that you should check it out. He also did some of RJs songs on his MTV unplugged set. Love Malted Milk. I do that one on guitar and it's a lot of fun.

justinlcecil
12-13-2012, 09:38 PM
Excellent Mark. The only Robert Johnson song I have mastered on the guitar is Walkin' Blues. I like the eric clapton version from the unplugged set. Before you accuse me is possibly one of if not my favorite song. I would love to play the RJ tunes on uke. Let me know what you think of the book.

Markr1
12-14-2012, 01:37 AM
I'll let you know Justin. I got it on eBay for $15 shipped. That's actually cheaper then amazon after shipping. Amazon shipping was almost $7 and that's why I passed on getting it thru them. I really like Before you cause me too and it has pretty much same chord progression and you can use the same walk down and turn around as malted milk only it's faster. I have to change keys tho because before you accuse me is higher on the vocals.
Excellent Mark. The only Robert Johnson song I have mastered on the guitar is Walkin' Blues. I like the eric clapton version from the unplugged set. Before you accuse me is possibly one of if not my favorite song. I would love to play the RJ tunes on uke. Let me know what you think of the book.

coolkayaker1
12-14-2012, 01:48 AM
Mark, I just got mine from Amazon. It looks like a good book. I sing like a wounded crow, though, and these songs are syncopated rhythms, as others have pointed out. So, no voice, no song. Ugh. But, ill get some bluesy riffs going and play along with RJe Complete CDs or Clapton, as you say.

Mark, consider Amazon Prime. Free two day shipping on all Prime items ( which is on anything shipped angpd sold through Amazon directly, about 75 percent if their stuff, no order minimum ( some small exceptions)... So you can buy a box of paper clips and they come in two days. Lol. Free Anazon prime digital movies, not as good as Netflix, but not bad. $79 per year. I get every penny of it since I buy even my toilet paper from Amazon. Still no sales tax, too. Ever get toilet paper in two day shipping? It's cool beans.

garyg
12-14-2012, 10:57 AM
I've never understood why some folks think that any art form is "owned" by one group and furthermore that these self-appointed morality police have the gall to chastise others for taking up that art form. The blues or any other art form should be judged by the quality of your work not by what your income level is. Just don't let me catch any of you Christians even *think* about singing Chanukah songs. Through our years of oppression we Jews effing own them. And that's the last word on the subject. Oh and Happy Chanukah to you MOTs out there, Christians and others out there, please do not enjoy my greeting, it would be cultural appropriation!

Barbablanca
12-14-2012, 11:07 AM
Next year in Jerusalem Gary ;)

Pippin
12-14-2012, 11:59 PM
Anyone had their hands on this book (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Johnson-Ukulele-Leonard-Publishing-Corporation/dp/1458459659/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355268658&sr=1-1)?

It's got the same photo on the cover and the same sepia tint as the "RJ for Guitar" published recently and considered difficult, but definitive. But that says nothing, because there aren't that many photos considered authentic of the author of Come on in my Kitchen....

So, anyone actually held it in their hands and thought of heading down to the Crossroads with it? ;)

The book is sitting in my den. I will be reviewing it in the next issue of Ukulele Player.

Pippin
12-15-2012, 12:06 AM
I just got it last night. It's excellent. Believable renditions of some incredible music. The ukulele translates these songs well. One observation is that many of these songs are in the same key and have a similar structure. That's good and bad. Once you learn some of the riffs, many of the songs sound very similar, but you do quickly learn a lot of songs and you really get to explore a couple keys in detail. You do have to be familiar with the music. There are songs were the notes are sparse and it is all about syncopation, timing and feel.

Definitely recommend.

That's good and bad? Nope, that's Robert Johnson. There are a few reasons that blues artists, in particular, sounded so much the same from song to song... most were self-taught, limited vocal range, and a money-making style. RJ was struggling to feed himself. He did what every artist did, played what a live audience paid to see.

Pippin
12-15-2012, 12:09 AM
I most definitely see your point, but then you don't have to be a white Austrian to play Mozart either, thank God.

I thought of this exact example. Great minds think alike. :)

Pippin
12-15-2012, 12:14 AM
Great. That made me laugh out loud. At 4am.

If Webby hadn't set that up, we wouldn't get this wonderful punch line.

There is such a thing as a poser though, and I get Webby's frustration. I just don't know if I can quantify who that poser is? Maybe it's the self-absorbed, entitled, rich suburban white kid who only thinks they know what adversity is. But, what if said white kid has some serious chops playing the blues? What if the hands and ears get it even if the brain really doesn't? Still a poser then? Tough to say, but maybe we just know it when we see it.

What if the hands and ears get it, but the mind doesn't? Are people so lacking in empathy and wisdom that they cannot comprehend what another's plight is? I don't believe that I have to live in Calcutta, for example, to understand the struggle of people living in abject poverty. If that were the case, there would be no such thing as charity.

Pippin
12-15-2012, 12:23 AM
So if he had a four string cigar box instrument to play some blues, like the one used by Sir Paul recently, would he have called it a cigar box guitar or a baritone ukulele? In fact would a self respecting blues guitarist own a cigar box ukulele or a cigar box guitar with four strings?

There is a popular Robert Johnson photograph of him holding a Gibson guitar. He never played that guitar... they just stuck it in his hand for the picture. Lots of RJ fans that play have sought a guitar like it, nonetheless.

drbekken
12-15-2012, 12:47 AM
There is a popular Robert Johnson photograph of him holding a Gibson guitar. He never played that guitar... they just stuck it in his hand for the picture. Lots of RJ fans that play have sought a guitar like it, nonetheless.

And, in the original version of the photo used on the cover of the book discussed in this thread, Johnson is smoking a cigarette. In true Soviet style, that has been taken out of the photo, to clean things up... This is not to say that I recommend smoking, but it is interesting to see how the the falsification of history can alter our perception of things.

Pippin
12-15-2012, 01:02 AM
And, in the original version of the photo used on the cover of the book discussed in this thread, Johnson is smoking a cigarette. In true Soviet style, that has been taken out of the photo, to clean things up... This is not to say that I recommend smoking, but it is interesting to see how the the falsification of history can alter our perception of things.

The original was shot in a photo-booth. Removing the cigarette is like removing a piece of history. You are right.

jwieties
12-15-2012, 01:51 AM
That's good and bad? Nope, that's Robert Johnson. There are a few reasons that blues artists, in particular, sounded so much the same from song to song... most were self-taught, limited vocal range, and a money-making style. RJ was struggling to feed himself. He did what every artist did, played what a live audience paid to see.
You are right Pippin. My comment was not a critique of Robert Johnson, but of this book... And it was not meant as a negative critique, but rather just wanted people to know what they were getting. RJs music is largel E blues (on guitar), Open D slide and Open G slide. This book mostly focuses on one of these styles. For some who purchase the book, these songs are going to become repetitive. These are accurate transcriptions which is what I far prefer, but from another thread, the OP stated he was looking to move into fingerstyle playing. If one was looking for instrumental renditions of RJ tunes, this is not it, as cool kayaker pointed out. I am a tremendous RJ fan and have appreciated the comments you and drbekken posted. This music should be greatly respected and had this book translated this into if style solo pieces, I personally think it would have lost a great deal of soul.

I've liked the discussion. While Webby's comment was beaten up a bit, and although i dont agree, there is merit in what he said. There are two lines of thinking that have been explored. One is that this music is so tied into the culture and experience from which it was created that, while it can be appreciated, it can't truly be recreated outside that context. However, there is another that these "bluesmen" we're no different then the musicians of today. That they simply played the music folks wanted to hear and were just as likely to play other styles . I think the blues revival with Lomax and others supports this second interpretation. Many of these artist that were all of a sudden playing shows for 10,000 white college kids expressed being humbled, were excited to tell their stories and taught a few of these kids there craft.

I have two favorite musical experiences, both involving Harry Tuft and the Denver Folk Lore Center. Once I was there and started playing some Skip James. Harry heard this and poked his head out from the back saying that my playing sounded great. I appreciated the compliment, but it took on an entire new meaning when Harry told me he opened for Skip once in Philly. He shared with me a few stories of how they interacted and that scene at that time. From that experience I certainly have no problem with myself playing the blues and I sincerely don't think Skip James would have had a problem with it either.

However, when I ordered this book I even chuckled, because at the same time I ordered "From Lute to Uke". To justify playing those tunes, I have dedicated my to life stealing from the rich to give to the poor.

Nicko
12-15-2012, 02:24 AM
IMHO, A reading of Leroi Jones' (Amiri Baraka's) book "Blues People" might shed some light on webby's comments.
Classic blues are wonderful to listen to and interesting to study. But anybody in the 21st century posing as an
early-mid 20th century African-American blues musician would look and sound quite naive.

The point is a good one and more than worth reflecting on. There is a long history of (mis)appropriation and exploitation of African-American music (and so much else, for that matter). There's lots there to take on board. And we should spend time with those realities.

The other side of the matter is that if you take the blackness out of American music, you wouldn't have much left. Robert Johnson's music (and the music of so many others who were, during their lives, kept outside the "mainstream" of our national life, whatever that may be) is integrally part of the American musical soul -- solid and prominent in the "great American songbook". Although I appreciate the point made, I don't see any benefit to keeping Robert Johnson and so many others on the "outside" of our lives.

I mean, if we can't sing one another's songs, what are our chances?

But, granted, it IS a complex set of issues.

:2cents:
N

LifesShort
12-15-2012, 02:34 AM
.....music is so tied into the culture and experience from which it was created that, while it can be appreciated, it can't truly be recreated outside that context.

I've heard this over and over throughout my life (always from middle-class white people=ironic, isn't it?) and I just don't agree. By that same logic, unless you have lived under the same conditions/circumstances and in the same culture and time period as the blues artist, you can never understand the blues. If this were true, how come these same blues artists have embraced the singing and playing of people like Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughn? In my opinion, one of the best blues records ever is Albert King and Stevie Ray Vaughn's "Sessions." I don't think that Albert King would have recorded with SRV or that B.B. King would have recorded with Clapton if they didn't think that these white men, who never worked in a cotton field and led a life of true poverty, could create true blues music.

Do these folks think that you have to be living in dire circumstances to play and sing the blues? If so, B.B. King should have stopped playing and singing a long time ago. At least financially, he hasn't had any reason to be blue in years. Like someone else said a few posts previously, you don't have to be Austrian to play classical music. I don't see why people think you have to be a black person born into poverty to sing the blues.

coolkayaker1
12-15-2012, 02:37 AM
I still sing the Partridge Family theme in the shower even though I'll never be David Cassidy.

My wife says I'm more like Rubin Kincaid. But without hair.

garyg
12-15-2012, 02:38 AM
This is an interesting thread, and several of you have raised the issue that always evokes a strong personal response (and previous post) from me, and that is the argument that art is tied only to a certain people, place and time. For me this view denies one of the most important principles by which I live my life (if I may wax philosophical or personal for a minute) that -- deep down humans all have the same basic needs and wants. In fact, isn't the best definition of "great art" that which transcends cultural boundaries and appeals to what is universal among peoples and not what is distinctive between them? As for white middle class guys playing the blues, I don't think that people should be very quick to judge by skin color, culture or income (to reiterate a comment already made repeatedly on this thread --should no one but white Austrians be allowed to play Mozart). So I'm a middle aged, middle class white guy, am I not entitled to play the blues? Let's see, I'm also an only child raised by a single Mom (only saw my father twice in my life) who at ages 12 and 14 came home from school to find my mother unconscious lying in pools of vomit and excreta because she had tried to commit suicide from overdosing. Does that allow me to play the blues? But I've gone on to become a well known aquatic ecologist who has been paid to lecture on multiple continents. Hmmm, I guess that doesn't allow me to play the blues. I could go on but my guess is that everyone got the point by the last sentence <g>. I will say that music is one thing that has allowed me to express how I felt, from the high times to the low times throughout my life's journey, so the idea of denying that form of expression to anyone because of skin color, economic status, or culture, is anathema to me. It really feels like a form of fascism or totalitarianism. In a very real sense that's what so great about playing the uke (and I wish that I'd discovered the uke when I was 15 rather than 57) - it is a relatively inexpensive instrument (hence available to all economic classes) that is highly versatile (can play Mozart or Robert Johnson) that transcends social classes and hence, is a great unifier of people. "Uke on" and play whatever music touches your soul! Have a good weekend. g2

Nicko
12-15-2012, 02:46 AM
I don't see why people think you have to be a black person born into poverty to sing the blues.

And hell's bells, the blues' appeal is global and timeless because it speaks deeply to the human condition, right? There's a reason that greatness is great.

:deadhorse:

N

drbekken
12-15-2012, 02:58 AM
And hell's bells, the blues' appeal is global and timeless because it speaks deeply to the human condition, right? There's a reason that greatness is great.

:deadhorse:

N

...and ALL great music has some sort of underlying blues sensibilty; the need to express a complex set of emotions - joy, sorrow, rage, anger, need, deprivation, ecstasy, happiness, contention (you name some more) - maybe in the course of one single song, or even one single phrase. The human condition, or predicament, is extremely difficult to pinpoint. Music is here to help us make an attempt. If a musician plays music he loves, to the best of his abilities, what more can we ask? And what right do have to discourage him?

moondancer
12-15-2012, 04:03 AM
its looking like this book will top the best sellers list this christmas the way everyones buying it. Me included. also i'm white, half Irish half Lancashire and LOVE blues and country, and if it was'nt for guys copying Robert Johnson and the like, we'ed all be musical illiterates...................have a great christmas folks

Barbablanca
01-14-2013, 11:35 AM
What would be really nice for us wannabe cottonpickers is for someone good to make a video of the song exactly as it is tabbed so that we can get the syncopation down.

That would be brilliant. I got the book for King's Day (6th Jan) and have made a start on a couple of pieces that looked simpler. The trouble is that I am no music reader. I can tell you which notes I'm playing, but I am never sure if I have got the note durations and the rhythms right. Of course, if someone who reads music and tab fluently here says "Go listen to the originals because this book represents accurate transcriptions!", then Kimosabe & I's request might be superfluous.

.... But it'd still be nice if someone did the videos ;)

Plainsong
01-14-2013, 04:56 PM
Not all arrangement books have decent transcriptions of what was actually being played. Sometimes they change the key, or they make the notes easier and take away syncopations and what not, perhaps even remove notes. It just depends on the book. Do you want to play it exactly as in the book or exactly as it was actually played? If you'd rather play it as it was played, then why not just go have a listen to those songs, and use the book as a guide?

If you want to use just the book instead, and you're not sure of you're ability, then yeah...videos. I could tell you to subdivide the rhythm and all that, but ..yeah... Someone needs to post vids. :D


That would be brilliant. I got the book for King's Day (6th Jan) and have made a start on a couple of pieces that looked simpler. The trouble is that I am no music reader. I can tell you which notes I'm playing, but I am never sure if I have got the note durations and the rhythms right. Of course, if someone who reads music and tab fluently here says "Go listen to the originals because this book represents accurate transcriptions!", then Kimosabe & I's request might be superfluous.

.... But it'd still be nice if someone did the videos ;)

Barbablanca
01-15-2013, 12:40 AM
I'm interested in learning how the arrangements in the book sound. Obviously, this would have helped if the book had come with a CD... or, as I said earlier, if the transcriptions are accurate of the originals (difficult considering it's 4 strings against 6 I know).

PhilUSAFRet
09-18-2019, 05:25 AM
Nothing to brag about

kkimura
09-18-2019, 05:06 PM
I just don't get the RJ thing, and white middle class folks in 2012 shouldn't be singing about how hard it is working in the cotton field BECAUSE THEY DON"T WORK IN THE COTTON FIELDS - It's a complete travesty - like the house of blues.

Not sure if RJ actually picked cotton.

kkimura
09-18-2019, 05:14 PM
I still sing the Partridge Family theme in the shower even though I'll never be David Cassidy.

My wife says I'm more like Rubin Kincaid. But without hair.

That's it exactly! I love playing Hawaiian songs, but, I'll never be a Hawaiian. Whenever you play someone else's song you are kinda paying tribute to their contribution to music.

Sharpshin
09-18-2019, 05:48 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4eEK4M61y10

Rory Block

PetalumaRescuke
09-18-2019, 08:01 PM
'nuff said (and Ry Cooder is white too)

Thought the Devil's front man was better, Beethoven be damned.

Jerryc41
09-19-2019, 01:07 AM
I just don't get the RJ thing, and white middle class folks in 2012 shouldn't be singing about how hard it is working in the cotton field BECAUSE THEY DON"T WORK IN THE COTTON FIELDS - It's a complete travesty - like the house of blues.

As far as I'm concerned, anyone can sing anything, provided they have the talent. Speaking of the blues, below is a funny set of rules about who can and who cannot sing the Blues. Very funny.

Requirements for singing the Blues

1. Most Blues begin, "Woke up this morning..."

2. "I got a good woman" is a bad way to begin the Blues, 'less you stick something nasty in the next line like, "I got a good woman, with the meanest face in town."

3. The Blues is simple. After you get the first line right, repeat it. Then find something that rhymes...sort of:

"Got a good woman with the meanest face in town.
Yes, I got a good woman with the meanest face in town.
Got teeth like Margaret Thatcher, and she weigh 500 pounds."

4. The Blues is not about choice. You stuck in a ditch, you stuck in a ditch - ain't no way out.

5. Blues cars: Chevys, Fords, Cadillacs and broken-down trucks.
Blues don't travel in Volvos, BMWs, or Sport Utility Vehicles.
Most Blues transportation is a Greyhound bus or a southbound train.
Jet aircraft an' state-sponsored motor pools ain't even in the running.
Walkin' plays a major part in the blues lifestyle. So does fixin' to die.

6. Teenagers can't sing the Blues. They ain't fixin' to die yet. Adults sing the Blues.
In Blues, "adulthood" means being old enough for the electric chair if you shoot a man in Memphis.

7. Blues can take place in New York City but not in Hawaii or any place in Canada.
Hard times in Minneapolis or Seattle is probably just clinical depression.
Chicago, St. Louis, and Kansas City are still the best place to have the Blues.
You cannot have the blues in any place that don't get rain.

8. A man with male pattern baldness ain't the blues. A woman with male pattern baldness is.
Breaking your leg cause you skiing is not the blues.
Breaking your leg 'cause a alligator be chomping on it is.

9. You can't have no Blues in a office or a shopping mall. The lighting is wrong.
Go outside to the parking lot or sit by the dumpster.

10. Good places for the Blues:
a. Highway
b. Jailhouse
c. Empty bed
d. Bottom of a whiskey glass

Bad places:
a. Dillard's
b. Gallery Openings
c. Ivy League Institutions
d. Golf Courses

11. No one will believe it's the Blues if you wear a suit, 'less you happen to be a old ethnic person, and you slept in it.

12. Do you have the right to sing the Blues?
Yes, if:
a. You older than dirt
b. You blind
c. You shot a man in Memphis
d. You can't be satisfied

No, if:
a. you have all your teeth
b. you were once blind but now can see
c. the man in Memphis lived
d. you have a 401K or trust fund

13. Blues is not a matter of color. It's a matter of bad luck.
Tiger Woods cannot sing the blues. Sonny Liston could.
Ugly white people also got a leg up on the blues.

14. If you ask for water and your darlin' give you gasoline, it's the Blues.
Other acceptable Blues beverages are:
a. Cheap Wine
b. Whiskey or Bourbon
c. Muddy Water
d. Nasty Black Coffee

The following are NOT Blues beverages:
a. Perrier
b. Chardonnay
c. Snapple
d. Slim Fast

15. If death occurs in a cheap motel or a shotgun shack, it's a Blues death.
Stabbed in the back by a jealous lover is another Blues way to die.
So is the electric chair, substance abuse, and dying lonely on a broke down cot.
You can't have a Blues death if you die during a tennis match or getting liposuction.

16. Some Blues names for women:
a. Sadie
b. Big Mama
c. Bessie
d. Fat River Dumpling

17. Some Blues names for men:
a. Joe
b. Willie
c. Little Willie
d. Big Willie

18. Persons with names like Michelle, Amber, Debbie, and Heather cannot sing the Blues, no matter how many men they shoot in Memphis.

19. Make your own Blues name Starter Kit:
a. name of physical infirmity (Blind, Cripple, Lame, etc)
b. first name (see above) plus name of fruit (Lemon, Lime, Kiwi, etc)
c. last name of President (Jefferson, Johnson, Fillmore, etc)
For example, Blind Lime Jefferson, Jakeleg Lemon Johnson or Cripple Kiwi Fillmore, etc. (Well, maybe not "Kiwi.")

20. I don't care how tragic your life: if you own a computer, you cannot sing the blues.

Jerryc41
09-19-2019, 01:11 AM
I just ordered it through Amazon. I had Amazon credit from their credit card, so it cost me nothing.

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B009NOY7N0/ref=dp_olp_all_mbc?ie=UTF8&condition=all

PetalumaRescuke
09-19-2019, 08:25 AM
Big Willie Johnson should sing I Ain't Lyin'

Jerryc41
09-19-2019, 09:12 AM
Check out "The Search for Robert Johnson" on DVD. Interesting connections between the book under discussion and some of the people identified in the film. The history of the original recordings of blues and the music of the South is fascinating. There was a lot of cross over between musicians in these groups as there was in jazz during the same period. Listen to Fred McDowell singing Amazing Grace.

Excellent documentary on Netflix: The Devil at the Crossroads.

Another Ukulele
09-19-2019, 05:55 PM
I'm interested in learning how the arrangements in the book sound. Obviously, this would have helped if the book had come with a CD... or, as I said earlier, if the transcriptions are accurate of the originals (difficult considering it's 4 strings against 6 I know).

Another difficult aspect is that many of the ‘old time’ Blues Artists tuned their guitar uniquely — such that some times they only had ‘4’ notes.

And not all Blues are about ‘picking cotton ‘.
Bo Carter was master of the Single Entendres
Don’t Mash My Digger Down So Deep
Banana inYour Fruit Basket
Won’t You Warm My Weiner
And, of course, the great classic
Corrina Corrine

And the female Lil’ Johnson
Press My Button, Give My Bell a Ring

Love those hokum blues

Kenn2018
09-22-2019, 06:10 PM
Yep. Some of those Blues songs can make a rapper blush. :o