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Tailgate
12-11-2012, 02:16 PM
First winter with ukes hanging on the wall.. usually humidity is running 42% plus inside on the weather station thingy... with cold outside and heater on, I noticed a slight drop. Any concerns? I don't feel like casing 4 ukes, so do I need to look into a room humidifier? 3 of the 4 are solid wood.. my Kala is a laminate. thanks in advance for advice..

Bob (would rather be safe than sorry) in Texas

coolkayaker1
12-11-2012, 02:19 PM
The humidity in my house is 24 percent.

My eyeballs itch.

Tailgate
12-11-2012, 02:23 PM
Ha! Men usually worry about the other set itching :D

JamieFromOntario
12-11-2012, 02:27 PM
It get's pretty cold where I live and can get quite dry in the winter.

I bought a cheap-ish humidifier and do my best to keep the room where my ukes are humidified. It keeps my room at about 40-45%

You've got some nice ukes, so I would really consider getting one.

OldePhart
12-11-2012, 02:36 PM
First winter with ukes hanging on the wall.. usually humidity is running 42% plus inside on the weather station thingy... with cold outside and heater on, I noticed a slight drop. Any concerns? I don't feel like casing 4 ukes, so do I need to look into a room humidifier? 3 of the 4 are solid wood.. my Kala is a laminate. thanks in advance for advice..

Bob (would rather be safe than sorry) in Texas

I wouldn't panic over 37% (assuming the gage is accurate) but if it stays there for long I'd do something to boost the humidity a bit in that room a little. If the ukes are good quality you're not likely to see issues over a single winter but, over years, yeah, it could be an issue (and with the ukes you list in your signature I'd err on the side of safety).

On the other hand, you want to be careful with room humidifiers. The cheap ones can really overdo it. With ukes that nice hanging in there I think I'd spring for a controlled unit that actually holds a set humidity rather than a cheap one that just runs all the time it's turned on.

John

Tailgate
12-11-2012, 03:04 PM
I wouldn't panic over 37% (assuming the gage is accurate) but if it stays there for long I'd do something to boost the humidity a bit in that room a little. If the ukes are good quality you're not likely to see issues over a single winter but, over years, yeah, it could be an issue (and with the ukes you list in your signature I'd err on the side of safety).

On the other hand, you want to be careful with room humidifiers. The cheap ones can really overdo it. With ukes that nice hanging in there I think I'd spring for a controlled unit that actually holds a set humidity rather than a cheap one that just runs all the time it's turned on.

John

gracias John.. good advice

itsme
12-11-2012, 03:24 PM
I guess I just don't understand the "hang 'em on the wall" line of thought. Sure, you might enjoy looking at them and it might inspire you to grab one more often or play multiple ukes in one session.

But really, how hard is it to spend a few seconds taking one out of or putting it back into its case?

Tailgate
12-11-2012, 03:33 PM
you're totally right about inspiration to grab one.. they're not eye candy at all, I just seem to reach for a different uke here and there and when I play the chosen one, I'm thrilled with the diversity of sound... if I put them in a case I think I would get stuck in a deep rut and not be able to enjoy each one..but, that's just me :D Tonight I picked up the Collings and thought it just didn't sound right, but when I changed over to the KoAloha, it was the most pleasing sound and it made my day. Other times it's been the reverse. I'm still a noobie and thrilled with simple things... and still thrilled with the great diversity in this wonderful online community..

ukeeku
12-11-2012, 03:55 PM
I keep the room they stay in at 45-50% all year. Humidify in the winter, dehumidify in the summer (The room is in a basement)
I have found that 47% is a sweet spot for a couple of my ukes. If I can't get it high enough I case them with humidifiers.

coolkayaker1
12-11-2012, 05:08 PM
Tonight I picked up the Collings and thought it just didn't sound right, but when I changed over to the KoAloha, it was the most pleasing sound and it made my day. Other times it's been the reverse. . Why, Tail?

Harold O.
12-11-2012, 05:47 PM
Why, Tail?

Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don't.

hoosierhiver
12-12-2012, 04:23 AM
Your skin will feel better if the air is more humid. Get a room humidifier or even a fish tank and house plants will help.

Tailgate
12-12-2012, 05:00 AM
Your skin will feel better if the air is more humid. Get a room humidifier or even a fish tank and house plants will help.

been looking online at several models... anyone have suggestions? I know it will help with sinus issues and the uke peace of mind issue

Tailgate
12-12-2012, 05:00 AM
Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don't.

exactly!!!!!!

hoosierhiver
12-12-2012, 05:13 AM
We use the big faux cabinet type at the shop and the tower type at home. They both work well.

bearbike137
12-12-2012, 05:41 AM
Gotta humidify the music room in the winter - de-humidify in the summer.

Shoot for 47%.

The ukes will thank you.

RichM
12-12-2012, 07:28 AM
been looking online at several models... anyone have suggestions? I know it will help with sinus issues and the uke peace of mind issue

Basic humidfiers fall broadly into three categories: Evaporative, Vaporizers, and Ultrasonic. All have pluses and minuses.

Evaporative use a honeycomb of fibers call a wick (and often mischaracterized as a filter). Water from a tank is soaked into the wick, and air from a fan blows it as vapor into the room.

Pros: Inexpensive to run, as the fan is the only real cost. Minerals and other impurities tend to get absorbed into the wick, meaning there is less of it in the air. Units themselves are fairly inexpensive. Safe, as there is very little risk if they are knocked over. Like all humidifiers, needs frequent cleaning, but probably less so than the other models.

Cons: Wicks need to be replaced frequently, and at around $10 each, can run into money. If the wick is allowed to dry out completely, it will probably never work properly again and will need to be replaced. Like most humidifiers, if you have hard water, you may notice a fine white dust in your room (although I find this is less prevalent than with Ultrasonics).

Vaporizers use heat to turn water into steam.

Pros: Heating the water helps remove impurities and nasty things that like to live in stagnant water. Probably best for your lungs, too. Less incidence of white dust in the room. No wicks to clean or replace.

Cons: High energy costs, since you are constantly heating water. Increased risk of damage or injury due the presence of hot water and heating elements. I wouldn't use one where there is a risk of it being knocked over by children or pets. Needs be cleaned frequently, as the impurities that don't go into the air stay in the humidifier and can turn to gunk.

Ultrasonics use very fast vibrations turn turn water to mist which is then blown into the room

Pros: Almost silent. No wicks to clean or replace. Inexpensive to run.

Cons: Probably the highest incidence of white dust, especially if you have hard water (pellets that you drop in the tank can help manage this, but they won't remove it). Frequent cleaning necessary to combat organisms that grow in standing water.

Skinny Money McGee
12-12-2012, 08:07 AM
I had a "Aprilaire 600" whole house humidifier installed. Cost was about 250 installed by my HVAC guy. Keeps the whole house at no less than 40 to 45% RH. If your a handy type person, these aren't difficult to install yourself, saving about 80 dollars. The wick pads (water panel) get changed once a year and cost about 10 to 15 dollars if you shop around. Many sellers on ebay..etc..

http://www.aprilaire.com/index.php?znfAction=ProductDetails&category=5&item=600

RichM
12-12-2012, 08:13 AM
I had a "Aprilaire 600" whole house humidifier installed. Cost was about 250 installed by my HVAC guy. Keeps the whole house at no less than 40 to 45% RH. If your a handy type person, these aren't difficult to install yourself, saving about 80 dollars. The wick pads get changed once a year and cost about 10 to 15 dollars if you shop around. Many sellers on ebay..etc..

http://www.aprilaire.com/index.php?znfAction=ProductDetails&category=5&item=600

One of these was already installed in my house when I moved in. I was advised by two different HVAC repairmen not to use it, as it encourages the growth of mold in ductwork. What's your experience been? I'd much rather use the whole house system than constantly fill the resevoirs of tabletop units.

Skinny Money McGee
12-12-2012, 08:32 AM
One of these was already installed in my house when I moved in. I was advised by two different HVAC repairmen not to use it, as it encourages the growth of mold in ductwork. What's your experience been? I'd much rather use the whole house system than constantly fill the resevoirs of tabletop units.

Have had no problems what so ever. That said, we have excellent treated city water here. I shut off the bypass damper in the summer and open in the winter. The water supply taps off the hot water heater. I don't think the system will allow the amount of humidity to produce mold. 45% sure is much more comfortable in the winter though. No static electricity, our hardwood floors don't shrink up and less dry skin.

There is certainly more humidity inside the house in the summer, and there is no mold collecting in the ducts either.

RichM
12-12-2012, 09:12 AM
Have had no problems what so ever. That said, we have excellent treated city water here. I shut off the bypass damper in the summer and open in the winter. The water supply taps off the hot water heater. I don't think the system will allow the amount of humidity to produce mold. 45% sure is much more comfortable in the winter though. No static electricity, our hardwood floors don't shrink up and less dry skin.

There is certainly more humidity inside the house in the summer, and there is no mold collecting in the ducts either.

Thanks for the feedback! I did a little internet research, and the conventional wisdom seems to agree with you-- that whole house humidifiers don't generate nearly enough moisture to encourage mold growth. I'm turning mine back on tonight!

OldePhart
12-12-2012, 03:24 PM
Your skin will feel better if the air is more humid. Get a room humidifier or even a fish tank and house plants will help.

Sinuses, too. I was stationed in southwestern OK for three years back in the early 80's. It was so dry I'd get nosebleeds until we got a humidifier for the bedroom.

JOhn

OldePhart
12-12-2012, 03:28 PM
Basic humidfiers fall broadly into three categories: Evaporative, Vaporizers, and Ultrasonic. All have pluses and minuses.

Actually, there's a fourth, though it's similar to the ultrasonic and maybe they don't make them any more. Back in the early 80's I had one that had a high speed centrifical pump (like an underwater squirrel-cage fan) that atomized the water and created just enough pressure to push air and atomized water out the vent on top. That was the best humidifier I ever had and made very soothing white noise to sleep by, too.

John