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Ukuleleblues
12-20-2012, 06:11 AM
I am trying to learn As time Goes By (http://www.ukulizer.com/ukulizer.php?file=/songs/As%20Time%20Goes%20By[2]). It has a Am+7, What is that chord and what exactly does the +7 mean? An Am does't have a 7th. I don't understand chord constructs well enough. Can anyone shed some light what the cord is and how you figured it out.

DaveVisi
12-20-2012, 06:51 AM
+7 means "augmented seventh"
I don't know the fingering for Am +7 but you can start your search looking for augmented chords.

Patrick Madsen
12-20-2012, 06:54 AM
All open strings. I looked it up in the Ukulele Handbook by Axel Richter. I just play a Am with a 7th (4th string 2nd fret and 2nd string 3rd fret)

I play the song in Dm and it has a Dm7 so you may be playing in Am and it would have an Am7.

Bill Mc
12-20-2012, 07:26 AM
If I were playing that chord in the context of the song I would play an a minor with a G# (1000). One possible sequence 2000, 1000, 0000, 2223. Or 9987, 9887, 9787, 5655 or 5657. I know the root is missing in the 9787 but it sounds good to me. I think the + sign means to play the 7th tone with the a minor as it appears in the A major scale. And that is a G#.

Ukulele JJ
12-20-2012, 11:22 AM
Yeah, I think that chart is in error. It should really be an Am(maj7), which would indeed be 1000, as Bill Mc said. I've never seen that notated as "Am+7". That's just weird. :-)

The idea is that you have a nice little descending line in the harmony: The one note in the chord that moves from A to Ab to G. Or, 2000 to 1000 to 0000.

JJ

Newportlocal
12-20-2012, 11:27 AM
All open strings. I looked it up in the Ukulele Handbook by Axel Richter. I just play a Am with a 7th (4th string 2nd fret and 2nd string 3rd fret)

I play the song in Dm and it has a Dm7 so you may be playing in Am and it would have an Am7.

What he said. I have only played Am7 as four open strings in Stairway to Heaven.

http://www.scorpexuke.com/pdffiles/Stairway_to_Heaven.pdf

Nicko
12-20-2012, 11:41 AM
Ukulele Chordfinder (http://www.ukulele.nl/chordfinder.php) gives 1000.
46535

Ukuleleblues
12-20-2012, 03:09 PM
Thank you all, I am going to try and figure out what the +7 meant so I don't have to bug folks next time I see something like that. Anyone know of a good book or site that explains the makeup of a chord?

Ukulele JJ
12-20-2012, 04:37 PM
Thank you all, I am going to try and figure out what the +7 meant so I don't have to bug folks next time I see something like that.

I think it "meant" an Am(maj7), it just went about it a weird way.

Normally the "+" means "augmented". So you might see a C+ or C+5 chord as an alternate way of saying Caug. To "augment" means to sharpen the note (raise it up one fret... also known as one half-step). So instead of playing the normal "5" note of the C chord, which is a G note, you'd augment it and make it a G# note.

But you wouldn't normally augment a 7th of a chord. If you sharpen the major 7th of a chord, you just wind up with the root of the chord an octave higher. And if you sharpen a minor 7th, you just end back up with a major 7th.

I get what the person was trying to do. The 7th of a minor 7th chord is a minor 7th. So I guess it makes sense in some way to call it a "+7" if you wanted to sharpen it (augment it) back up to a major 7th. But then you'd just call it a major 7th and be done with it.

To call it a "+7" is kind of like calling it a "sharp flat 7" with is just kooky. Sort of along lines of me saying that I'm 5'15" tall instead of 6'3". I mean, it's technically the same height, but nobody says it that way! :-)

JJ

Louis0815
12-21-2012, 07:36 AM
Ukulele Chordfinder (http://www.ukulele.nl/chordfinder.php) gives 1000.
46535and www.ukulelehelper.com knows a total of 9 different fingerings for the Am7M:
1000
2443
5440
5800
1453
5857
9880
99811
98812

BIGDB
12-21-2012, 07:55 AM
I just looked it up on this app I have and it said a open strum. Hope this helps

Plainsong
12-21-2012, 01:04 PM
Yeah it's probably a theory reason why it's an aug 7th, but most composer/arranger types will mark it in a way that is readable, not aug 7th. It's like having a piece with lots of flat-flats or sharp-sharps. Might be correct in a theory class, but will have the people that are reading it hunting you with pitchforks. :)



I think it "meant" an Am(maj7), it just went about it a weird way.

Normally the "+" means "augmented". So you might see a C+ or C+5 chord as an alternate way of saying Caug. To "augment" means to sharpen the note (raise it up one fret... also known as one half-step). So instead of playing the normal "5" note of the C chord, which is a G note, you'd augment it and make it a G# note.

But you wouldn't normally augment a 7th of a chord. If you sharpen the major 7th of a chord, you just wind up with the root of the chord an octave higher. And if you sharpen a minor 7th, you just end back up with a major 7th.

I get what the person was trying to do. The 7th of a minor 7th chord is a minor 7th. So I guess it makes sense in some way to call it a "+7" if you wanted to sharpen it (augment it) back up to a major 7th. But then you'd just call it a major 7th and be done with it.

To call it a "+7" is kind of like calling it a "sharp flat 7" with is just kooky. Sort of along lines of me saying that I'm 5'15" tall instead of 6'3". I mean, it's technically the same height, but nobody says it that way! :-)

JJ