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View Full Version : Sheet music says C#m, all ukulele covers skip it?



Youkalaylee
12-28-2012, 05:54 AM
I had been trying to learn something else, but after getting frustrated my partner wisely suggested learning a slower, simpler song first. I can see clesrly now by johnny Nash is nice and easy. D, G, A, C, F, and D6 are all within my reach at this early stage.

Yet there is an evil chord lurking on the 2nd page, in the mid-section of the song after I had happily strummed (slowly) through the chorus and verse. C#m.

Yet while watching several ukulele covers of this song, they all seem to skip this chord. Including one posted on this forum. Is there because of differing interpretations of the same song, or people adapting its difficulty?

ksiegel
12-28-2012, 07:04 AM
Can you play a Bm? (4222) If so, just slide it up one fret (5333)

(Where the 4 and 5 are the g/G string)

Also, realize that yes, a) people interpret differently, and b) we hear things differently. The writer may have a C#m in the song, but if I don't hear it, I won't use it when I write down my interpretation of the song.

There are several songs I use minor chords in, that aren't in the sheet music I've seen, and others where I do a I-V-vi-IV progression, but some of the tutorials on line say it is a I-vi-V-IV, and they use a different rhythm.

So what? Make it work for YOU.



-Kurt

KoaDependent
12-28-2012, 07:39 AM
Slight correction to what Kurt wrote. A C#m would be 6444 as C# is two steps up from a B.

And you only need the C#m in that song if you're going to do the chord changes on the long, sustained 'nothing but blue skiiiiiies' part just like Jimmy Cliff did. If you want to modify the chord change you could probably just bend to different notes.

Hippie Dribble
12-28-2012, 08:17 AM
hey Youkalaylee



Easiest way to play C#m (for me anyway) is to play it as a barre chord, where you'll barre the entire 4th fret with your index finger, and the G string on the 6th fret with your ring finger.

More generally speaking, it's a really crucial part of your overall development as a player to practice hard and get the barre chords working. It will just increase your flexibility in playing; it will open up so much more of the fretboard and provide you with a wider range of choices in your own interpretations.

All the best with it!

TG&Y
12-28-2012, 08:36 AM
C#m (and Bm) are the bane of my existence now. I shudder at the sight of them on a song chord sheet. Just as I used to Bb, which comes much more easily these days. There seem to be a hand-full of roadblock chords which commonly cause frustration when learning your way around the fretboard. This too will pass (I hope).

I don't know the answer to your question as to whether C#m is omitted in some songs to facilitate ease in playing. One can only hope...

mm stan
12-28-2012, 08:43 AM
http://www.ukulelesongs.com/uke/ukulele_chords/music/tabs/Johnny_Nash/I_Can_See_Clearly_Now.php

Yes I see it in the Chorus... as Eugene ukulele says barre is a nice and easier transition when you get used to it, and gives you room for imbellishment notes and improvising within the barre chords structure with a finger more or so...
Second Chord positions you can use...
D- 2225
G- 4232
A- 6454
Bm- 4222
C#m 6444
see the pattern

Ukulele JJ
12-28-2012, 11:09 AM
I wouldn't skip it, because I think it's a cool part of the song. But if you wanted to skip it, go for it. You certainly shouldn't let difficulty with that section keep you from working on the rest of the tune.

You might try playing the C#m as a C#m7. That's just a simple barre along the 4th fret. Ditto for the Bm... make it a Bm7 and you can just barre the 2nd fret. I think that variation sounds pretty good. See for yourself.

JJ

P.S. Technically, it's a C#m/G# chord in both the Johnny Nash and Jimmy Cliff recordings. Notice the bass line--it's playing a G#, not a C#.

Youkalaylee
12-28-2012, 11:17 AM
hey Youkalaylee



Easiest way to play C#m (for me anyway) is to play it as a barre chord, where you'll barre the entire 4th fret with your index finger, and the G string on the 6th fret with your ring finger.

More generally speaking, it's a really crucial part of your overall development as a player to practice hard and get the barre chords working. It will just increase your flexibility in playing; it will open up so much more of the fretboard and provide you with a wider range of choices in your own interpretations.

All the best with it!

I'm determined to master it. I can quite comfortably barre a whole fret using my forefinger, plus my middle finger pressing down on my forefinger so that the two of them together barre along the 4th fret, then I can stretch to get my ring finger on the 6th at the g string yet my ringfinger keeps straying so that the c string buzzes as its being lightly touched by my ringfinger.

All practice though. This time last week I couldn't even barre with three fingers pressing down across one fret! I've been carrying a stress ball around with me and squeezing with my left hand to build up strength this week while at work etc. I think I can see benefits! :D

Youkalaylee
12-28-2012, 11:20 AM
I wouldn't skip it, because I think it's a cool part of the song. But if you wanted to skip it, go for it. You certainly shouldn't let difficulty with that section keep you from working on the rest of the tune.

You might try playing the C#m as a C#m7. That's just a simple barre along the 4th fret. Ditto for the Bm... make it a Bm7 and you can just barre the 2nd fret. I think that variation sounds pretty good. See for yourself.

JJ

P.S. Technically, it's a C#m/G# chord in both the Johnny Nash and Jimmy Cliff recordings. Notice the bass line--it's playing a G#, not a C#.

I'm playing the rest of the tune, practicing singing/humming the melody as I go, just that when I get to this chord I slow right down, have a go playing it once or twice, then carry on with the song like nothing happened. Or sometimes ill just barre across the 4th fret, play that as its a chord, then carry on. I'm aware that it sounds bad, but its getting me used to moving to where the chord is and getting me better at moving to a barre.

I quite like it too. I can hear in my head how it should sound. I always took my keyboard teacher for granted when I was at school but now I'm grateful for her forcing me to learn by repetition, and also for teaching me how to read music as well as music theory. It's coming in use now, even if I don't play keyboard anymore.

ksiegel
12-29-2012, 02:49 AM
Thanks - I was thinking backwards, and had an F#m/Gm in my head, with Bm/C hand positions...)


Slight correction to what Kurt wrote. A C#m would be 6444 as C# is two steps up from a B.

And you only need the C#m in that song if you're going to do the chord changes on the long, sustained 'nothing but blue skiiiiiies' part just like Jimmy Cliff did. If you want to modify the chord change you could probably just bend to different notes.


-Kurt