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Eriquito
01-04-2013, 09:32 AM
Anyone else out there? I feel like my voice should be a little less irritating to others (I sound great in my own head) and I wonder if its due to my voice being on the higher end.

Assuming this is the case, is there a way to if not, lower the pitch...lets say deepen the tone of my voice?

Let's also assume that I can sing on pitch (which I am fairly certain I can).

Is this just a case of being un-gifted genetically?

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
01-04-2013, 10:24 AM
I have a high singing voice (for a guy) as well. I find that I can hit a few lower pitches than usual early in the morning. But after I've been up for a few hours, there's no hope.

If you can sing on pitch over an octave or two, you are vocally blessed. (Your voice won't irritate anyone if you're on pitch and singing with confidence.)

If a song you'd like to sing is too low in pitch for your voice, transpose it into a key that works for you. If you're playing with others and transposing isn't an option, finding a harmony to sing that is in your range can always be done. Singing harmony comes naturally for some; for most---including me---it's a skill that can be learned.

Dan Uke
01-05-2013, 04:11 PM
A high pitched voice is a gift but at the same time, there's more to sing than just hitting the right notes.

Fuzzy
01-06-2013, 07:40 AM
Hey, I'm not being flippant here, but have you tried singing some Neil Young covers? Perhaps it's a case of finding the right songs for your voice...

PTOEguy
01-06-2013, 11:10 AM
Consider yourself lucky - almost all the great classical male solos are written for a higher voice. Much recent music is also designed for the upper register for most male vocalists.

If you're concerned about your tone, you might consider some voice lessons - there is a lot that can be done with technique to achieve different vocal effects. If you don't want to spring for voice lessons, you might consider joining a community choir. Growing up I sang is several different choirs and picked up a lot of technique. Most community choirs are significantly understocked on tenors with the ability to hit the high notes, so they'd likely welcome you with open arms.

Barbablanca
01-06-2013, 12:36 PM
You've obviously missed your epoch ;) - When I was in my late teens I had already developed a tenor voice, but all the bands I wanted to join at the time demanded that the vocalist be able to sing like Robert Plant (and all those in that high-pitched school) so I never got beyond the audition stage for rock bands and went into folk.

As someone has already mentioned, you should perhaps find material that plays to your strengths. "Communication Breakdown" on the Ukulele, anyone? ;)

Eriquito
01-07-2013, 07:49 AM
Whoa, thanks for the replies...so it sounds like I should work on my voice tone.

Uncle Rod Higuchi
01-07-2013, 08:39 AM
I remember watching "Hello Dolly" and one of the male leads (Head Clerk) had a high-pitched voice.

Later, I heard him sing a song from "Phantom of the Opera" and was surprised that he could 'go
low' when necessary for the song. I'm sure he had a lot of training in between. I think his name is
Michael Crawford.

Anyway, it seems like you could train yourself to sing at the lower register... however, as mentioned
above, a high-pitched voice is NOT a curse.

I'm asked to sing "tenor" for the church choir, but I consider myself a Baritone at least, if not a Bass!
The fact that I'm willing to 'reach' for those higher notes 'makes' me a tenor in the eyes of others.

Please communicate with the moderators of your local Song Circle and help them out if you notice
that the keys of the songs they generally sing are too low for yourself and some other members of
the 'Circle'.

It's been mentioned in a thread before, that when creating a songbook for a song circle, one of the
concerns is what KEYs to use for the final renditions. It's not always about what keys are easy to
play - especially, if everyone has difficulty singing in those keys. However, some keys are more
male-friendly (lower) and some are more female-friendly (higher), generally speaking. And those
of us who have the responsibility of creating 'community' songbooks really do not mean to make
the singability difficult for anyone :)

Selecting 'the KEY' for a song can be a hassle, especially if the 'best' key is something like Bb or Eb
or F# or Ab!! That said, not every song should be 'released' in C, F, G, A, or D.

By the way, if you had your 'druthers, what keys seem to be most comfortable for you? Example,
I do 'Tip Toe' in C, 'Happy Birthday' in F, 'Blue Moon' in A, etc. I'd really appreciate your input :)

keep uke'in',

Plainsong
01-15-2013, 10:48 AM
Yeah, his voice finally got past puberty late, thanks to tons of practice and incredible teachers. His voice really is amazing.

But yeah dude, you missed your calling! Being a good tenor, you'd be certain to have steady work in opera. And what everyone says here is correct. If you can sing high and it isn't falsetto (assuming here it isn't), you can join any choir or pretty much do whatever you want. The world needs a few good tenors! It's tough to say what you need to work on without hearing you, and even if we did.. we're just the internet. The best suggestion here was voice lessons.


I remember watching "Hello Dolly" and one of the male leads (Head Clerk) had a high-pitched voice.

Later, I heard him sing a song from "Phantom of the Opera" and was surprised that he could 'go
low' when necessary for the song. I'm sure he had a lot of training in between. I think his name is
Michael Crawford.

Anyway, it seems like you could train yourself to sing at the lower register... however, as mentioned
above, a high-pitched voice is NOT a curse.

I'm asked to sing "tenor" for the church choir, but I consider myself a Baritone at least, if not a Bass!
The fact that I'm willing to 'reach' for those higher notes 'makes' me a tenor in the eyes of others.

Please communicate with the moderators of your local Song Circle and help them out if you notice
that the keys of the songs they generally sing are too low for yourself and some other members of
the 'Circle'.

It's been mentioned in a thread before, that when creating a songbook for a song circle, one of the
concerns is what KEYs to use for the final renditions. It's not always about what keys are easy to
play - especially, if everyone has difficulty singing in those keys. However, some keys are more
male-friendly (lower) and some are more female-friendly (higher), generally speaking. And those
of us who have the responsibility of creating 'community' songbooks really do not mean to make
the singability difficult for anyone :)

Selecting 'the KEY' for a song can be a hassle, especially if the 'best' key is something like Bb or Eb
or F# or Ab!! That said, not every song should be 'released' in C, F, G, A, or D.

By the way, if you had your 'druthers, what keys seem to be most comfortable for you? Example,
I do 'Tip Toe' in C, 'Happy Birthday' in F, 'Blue Moon' in A, etc. I'd really appreciate your input :)

keep uke'in',

gitarzan
04-08-2013, 09:38 AM
Concur. A strong tenor is a beautiful thing to listen to.