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ukulelearp
12-06-2008, 05:37 AM
Hi,


I'm just learning to play the ukulele and guitar. I had been looking around for a nice, inexpensive, tenor ukulele and stumbled across the Yamaha Guitalele. My question is, do you think I will be better off with a regular ukulele? Could I fare just as well by simply muting the two top strings on the Yamaha when playing ukulele pieces?

WS64
12-06-2008, 06:18 AM
Depends what you want.
I am a big fan of the Yamaha Guitalele, but it's no substitute for a Ukulele.
It is on for the guitar though.

ukulelearp
12-06-2008, 09:06 AM
Well I was originally searching for a tenor ukulele, so I was wondering if this would satisfy my want of a tenor and also give me a little more versatility in one instrument.

GrumpyCoyote
12-06-2008, 09:22 AM
I want one in the worst way - but can't get them in the states.

I may have to just eat the shipping from the UK or Canada.

ukulelearp
12-06-2008, 09:30 AM
Well I'm in Texas, so if I get one I'll be importing it from Canada.

Kanaka916
12-07-2008, 05:10 AM
There are several threads about guitalele,
http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/search.php?searchid=296765

therimidalv
12-07-2008, 05:07 PM
Well, there is a tenor on sale at the UU store for just under 200 bucks. Pretty sweet deal. Good Uke also.

GrumpyCoyote
12-08-2008, 03:42 PM
Well, there is a tenor on sale at the UU store for just under 200 bucks. Pretty sweet deal. Good Uke also.

That thing is a great deal... Cool mahogany tenor, near perfect starter uke.

k0konutz
05-11-2009, 04:34 PM
Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but I'd like to continue the guitalele discussion.
I've sent an email to WS64 about stringing for EADGBE and he hasn't been satisfied with any of his findings, but is there a way to be able to mix-and-match strings if I know of a place that sells me individual strings? Can I use baritone uke strings for DGBE and then find two others that will do well for the lower pitches?
What strings does the Koaloha D-VI ship with? I think I heard somewhere that it can be tuned for standard guitar and also ADGCEA

Keonikapila
05-11-2009, 05:21 PM
I used to have a cheap baritone-ukulele-sized guitar, it's a little bigger than Yamaha's Guitalele, but this probably still applies.

The "normal" tuning using a regular set of classical guitar strings was ADGCEA, but I was able to tune it to EADGBE by using a 7-string classical set (basically you toss the 1st string and shift everything else down one slot)...it worked, but the strings are thick and 4 of them are wound and it was a little loose feeling (it'd probably feel tighter on a tenor, not sure if it would be too much tension though).

Stackabones
05-11-2009, 05:49 PM
For the higher tuning, you could get requinto strings.

k0konutz
05-11-2009, 09:40 PM
For the higher tuning, you could get requinto strings.

I think you can just use regular classical guitar strings, but they have to be tuned up to the higher tuning for the shorter scale as mentioned by Keonikapila.

Also, are there chord charts for ADGCEA instruments like requinto and guitalele and 1/4 size guitars? Google says no, or I didn't look hard enough.

Maybe I have to do it the hard way and scratch the correct notes on a regular guitar chord chart?

Ahnko Honu
05-11-2009, 11:45 PM
Why's it called a "Guitalele" instead of "Ukutar"? :cool:

Keonikapila
05-12-2009, 04:18 PM
....

Also, are there chord charts for ADGCEA instruments like requinto and guitalele and 1/4 size guitars? Google says no, or I didn't look hard enough.



Your chord shapes will be the same, ADGCEA is just the standard guitar tuning with a capo at the 5th fret. So, for example, the standard tuning "G-chord shapes" would be the C-Shapes in ADGCEA.

k0konutz
05-12-2009, 05:03 PM
Your chord shapes will be the same, ADGCEA is just the standard guitar tuning with a capo at the 5th fret. So, for example, the standard tuning "G-chord shapes" would be the C-Shapes in ADGCEA.
I understand that much...I know the shapes will be the same but if I play a G major shape on the guitalele it won't be the same pitch it is on the guitar. The chord coming out of it would be C, as mentioned. But are there diagrams out there that say what the C chord is on guitalele, for example?

Keonikapila
05-12-2009, 05:14 PM
I understand that much...I know the shapes will be the same but if I play a G major shape on the guitalele it won't be the same pitch it is on the guitar. The chord coming out of it would be C, as mentioned. But are there diagrams out there that say what the C chord is on guitalele, for example?


There are software applications as well as websites that allow you to define the tuning of a stringed instrument and then look up chords. I used to use ChordAlchemy (http://www.tonalalchemy.com/), but I'm sure there are free things hiding somewhere on the web.

k0konutz
05-12-2009, 09:28 PM
I actually just went ahead and bought this:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&Item=250300381470
It'll work out well enough so that I can be lazy and not have to let my mind do any work.
Unfortunately, most of those chord/tab software isn't available for Mac. I currently use a Open Source application to open powertab and guitar pro files but it gets a little funky sometimes.

maikii
11-24-2010, 07:40 PM
I think you can just use regular classical guitar strings, but they have to be tuned up to the higher tuning for the shorter scale as mentioned by Keonikapila.

Also, are there chord charts for ADGCEA instruments like requinto and guitalele and 1/4 size guitars? Google says no, or I didn't look hard enough.

Maybe I have to do it the hard way and scratch the correct notes on a regular guitar chord chart?

If you know guitar, you play the exact same chords, they just will sound one fourth higher. No need to look at a chord chart, Just remember it sounds in a different key.

Or, if you play ukelele and not guitar, the first four strings are pitched teh same as the uke, and wil play the same chords, Nice though, to learn chords with the lower two strings as well. For that you might need a chart. You could get a guitar chart, and transpose. Where the guitar chart says E, you know that is A on the guitalele.

maikii
11-24-2010, 07:42 PM
I understand that much...I know the shapes will be the same but if I play a G major shape on the guitalele it won't be the same pitch it is on the guitar. The chord coming out of it would be C, as mentioned. But are there diagrams out there that say what the C chord is on guitalele, for example?

I'm not sure why any diagram would be necessary. Just know that when you play C, it will sound F, four steps higher. Not a lot of figuring out. More time to try to figure out a diagram.

maikii
11-24-2010, 07:46 PM
Could anyone describe the difference in sound between a guitalele and a requinto, both tuned the same?

I read that a guitalele is the same size as a tenor uke. I certainly hooe its neck is wider than a tenor uke, to fit in two more strings,

As the requinto is larger, is it similar in size to a baritone uke? (I would imagine that the larger size would make the lower strings sound better, no?

maikii
12-14-2010, 06:57 PM
I understand that much...I know the shapes will be the same but if I play a G major shape on the guitalele it won't be the same pitch it is on the guitar. The chord coming out of it would be C, as mentioned. But are there diagrams out there that say what the C chord is on guitalele, for example?

Just think of the chord four steps down. If you want the chord to sound like a G major chord, you play a D major chord.

No reason to learn chord shapes all over again. If you already play the guitar, and know the chords you want, it is no different on the guitalele or requinto (tuned the same). It just sounds four steps higher than you think.