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Paul December
02-04-2013, 04:54 AM
Would someone please clarify some things about this instrument for me please?
From what I gather, the Renaissance 4-Course Guitar is about the size of a Baritone uke, and and paired strings. I've read that it is (usually) tuned G,C,E,A like a uke, but not reentrant.
Are the strings unison or octave apart?
Finally, I'm enjoying playing Early Music on my uke; would I be able to play the same transcriptions on this guitar :confused:

kissing
02-04-2013, 05:37 AM
I don't know, but now I'm even more curious, and want one..

DaveVisi
02-04-2013, 05:48 AM
I believe they're all unison, but I'll have to check further.


EDIT:
Okay, so some bass courses were octave. At least the highest pitched course was unison. Still looking...


MORE INFO:
Taking the approach that these are unplayable unless strings are available, I checked the La Bella website.
They say that their four course set consists of a low octave pair, two unison pairs, and a single high string.

You learn something new every day.

http://www.labella.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/LaBellaEarlyInstrumentsCatalog.pdf

JamieFromOntario
02-04-2013, 05:55 AM
Perhaps, UkeVal will chime in. I feel like he's probably our resident expert.

mds725
02-04-2013, 06:38 AM
Maybe this'll help. It helped me to understand what the OP was even talking about.

http://www.lgv-pub.com/Essays/Fink_-_Tuning_paper.pdf

Paul December
02-04-2013, 06:42 AM
I thought of having an 8 string Baritone uke built for this purpose, but something like this would actually be cheaper:
http://www.diabolus.org/workshop/guitar-renaissance/guitar-renaissance.htm
I can't find any reviews of this builder.
I wonder how the string tension is. I found my 8-string had too much tension for fingerstyle.

JamieFromOntario
02-04-2013, 06:49 AM
I wonder about just going for a baritone.
This is just a guess, but I would imagine that the main reason that Renaissance guitars had double courses was that the gut strings they would have used produced substantially less volume than modern strings.

Paul December
02-04-2013, 09:04 AM
I wonder about just going for a baritone.
This is just a guess, but I would imagine that the main reason that Renaissance guitars had double courses was that the gut strings they would have used produced substantially less volume than modern strings.

That is a good point.
...If true, I would guess a $1k baritone might be better made than a low end Ren . Guitar.

JamieFromOntario
02-04-2013, 09:37 AM
Here are a few nice 'budget' examples to get you excited!

http://www.lutesandguitars.co.uk/htm/cat11.htm

Look far down the page and take a peek at the crazy multi-level rosettes.

Paul December
02-05-2013, 07:13 AM
Absolutely Beautiful!


Here are a few nice 'budget' examples to get you excited!

http://www.lutesandguitars.co.uk/htm/cat11.htm

Look far down the page and take a peek at the crazy multi-level rosettes.

Ukeval
02-07-2013, 04:21 AM
Hello,
Renaissance guitar is probably a liittle bit bigger than ukes (mine is 55 cm string length)
Top is single then 2 and 3 double, unisson, and 4th is double, octave. you can either put the bass string outside (thumb side) to have like the low g on the uke, or put the treble 4th outside (and have an high g effect).
Most the renaissace guitar repertoire can be played on a low g uke, somes pieces works also with high g, but better with low g.
If you look at my "luthval" YT channel, I have some renaissance guitar video (as well as I did some pieces on the uke too as recently "La Monica")


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrhLpxX4EvE