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DaleR
02-09-2013, 02:24 AM
Has anyone experimented with different tunings? A uke friend suggested using banjo tuning, which lowers the E to a D. It was cool, but I went back to the standard tuning. A couple of hours ago, I dropped my bari down to EADG, strings have settled, and it really sounds cool! There is a little buzz on the A (G) string, but not bad. Standard bass lines sound with this tuning.

kissing
02-09-2013, 03:33 AM
My favourite "alternative" tuning on Baritone so far is GCEA, dropped one octave lower than regular ukulele range (with low G).
It sounds bassier than a regular baritone, but not so low that it's a bass guitar.

Here's a recording I once did with it:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCyLRHl0wEY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCyLRHl0wEY


The strings are Guadalupe low-GCEA strings for baritone (bought from Mainland ukulele shop)

DaleR
02-09-2013, 06:36 AM
and right back to standard DGBE! Was a fun experiment though....definitely puts the Kamoa bass in perspective.

Patrick Madsen
02-09-2013, 08:27 AM
After reading Dirk's Bulletin #4, I bought a set of Southcoast ML-RW's to experiment with Bb tuning. I like it a lot and if I want to play in C tuning, I just put a capo on the 2nd fret.

Anyone with a bari. should read the Bulletin #4 on his site. He explains how the different tunings affect the resonance of the instrument.

DaleR
02-09-2013, 09:21 AM
is there a link?!

Patrick Madsen
02-09-2013, 09:24 AM
http://www.southcoastukes.com/004.htm

DaleR
02-09-2013, 10:16 AM
cool!:shaka:

osogris
02-11-2013, 05:17 AM
I have been playing around with fifths tuning on a bari (got set from Southcoast) and am having a good time. I tried mandolin before and got sick of little metal strings eating into my fingers, but as a nylon string set on a ukulele, with a little more space for my fingers, it is easier than my initial experience with the mandolin, and is stretching my musical borders a little. Not all that hard, sounds different (a little darker sounding) and a lot of fun.

DaleR
02-11-2013, 06:54 AM
That sounds interesting. What are the exact notes you use?

Ubutunes
02-11-2013, 06:55 AM
I just got my first baritone (Kala SMHB) and wondering how far you can tune up regular linear G strings (the Aguilas that came are still on it) without damaging the instrument or the strings. Any thoughts...Can I torque these puppies to Bb?
Mike

Patrick Madsen
02-11-2013, 07:36 AM
I doubt it very much. The stress on the bridge may pull it off and the resonance of the instrument would be nullified. If you want to play linear Bb buy a set of Southcoast ML-RW. I suggest you go to the Southcoast website and read his bulletin #4 about baritone tuning and proper stringsets.
http://www.southcoastukes.com/004.htm

Ubutunes
02-11-2013, 08:26 AM
Thanks, Patrick. I have read the Southcoast stuff you refer to and will try their strings soon.

osogris
02-12-2013, 01:18 PM
CGDA, same as tenor banjo, mandola or cello. I started out with the Southcoast set, which is in Bb (Bb, F, C, G). I had intonation problems with the Bb string (usually not a problem, I like Southcoast strings) and then ended up playing with different strings to get it up two semi-tones to CGDA. At first I was just transposing mandolin chords, (which works fine) but then I tried searching for chords for tenor banjo and mandola and found a bunch. I have been compiling a list of easier chords in pen, and I may eventually pdf the thing. I like it better than mandolin (same chord shapes, but those sharp little mandolin strings and fitting my fingers into those little slots was driving me crazy), although your fingers have to stretch a bit more.
That sounds interesting. What are the exact notes you use?

coolkayaker1
02-12-2013, 01:37 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXvMXx0tWiE

Thank you Aaron Keim.

PeteyHoudini
02-12-2013, 01:43 PM
Sorry, I posted my message in the wrong thread. It was meant for the BARITONE HATERS thread. 8-)

Petey

Sanagi
02-12-2013, 05:31 PM
CGDA, same as tenor banjo, mandola or cello. I started out with the Southcoast set, which is in Bb (Bb, F, C, G). I had intonation problems with the Bb string (usually not a problem, I like Southcoast strings) and then ended up playing with different strings to get it up two semi-tones to CGDA. At first I was just transposing mandolin chords, (which works fine) but then I tried searching for chords for tenor banjo and mandola and found a bunch. I have been compiling a list of easier chords in pen, and I may eventually pdf the thing. I like it better than mandolin (same chord shapes, but those sharp little mandolin strings and fitting my fingers into those little slots was driving me crazy), although your fingers have to stretch a bit more.
I had a similar experience. CGDA on a baritone is my favorite tuning.

pdxuke
02-12-2013, 05:36 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXvMXx0tWiE

Thank you Aaron Keim.

Well, I can tell you one thing: this is making me want to start a Mya Moe baritone build. Now, before the prices go up. I want that first one in the video: that look like Mahogany to y'all?

DaleR
02-13-2013, 03:01 AM
CGDA, same as tenor banjo, mandola or cello. I like it better than mandolin (same chord shapes, but those sharp little mandolin strings and fitting my fingers into those little slots was driving me crazy), although your fingers have to stretch a bit more.

Very cool! I have the same problem with mandolin...it just does not feel right. I tried an experiment, which was discussed in another thread. I put some light classical guitar strings on my bari, making it the same tuning at the bottom four strings of the guitar OR just like the Kamoa bass. This really does bridge the gap between the contrabass sounds of the U Bass and the rest of the ukulele family. It has a very addictive tone and all the standard bass lines can be played, just up the 8va which gives it more volume acoustically.

I think I may be on to something here...:shaka:

lefou7
02-15-2013, 06:22 AM
I have been playing with an open G tuning that is GBDG. It works great. Anyone else using this tuning?

lefou7
02-15-2013, 06:38 AM
Try Open E which I am tuning as EG#BE. I have come up with some great chord structures for this tuning.

Ubutunes
02-15-2013, 06:38 AM
I have been playing with an open G tuning that is GBDG. It works great. Anyone else using this tuning?

What strings set/gauge you using for this?

lefou7
02-15-2013, 08:53 AM
Just regular baritone uke strings

Stackabones
02-15-2013, 09:50 AM
I have been playing with an open G tuning that is GBDG. It works great. Anyone else using this tuning?

I'd guess that sounds pretty bright, right?

I've messed around with the usual open G tuning, DGBD, which isn't much of a change.

Nipper
02-15-2013, 11:19 AM
Hi Chaps, I have 5 baritones and love them! I have one tuned in standard DGBE but all the others, the ones I play in my band, are GceA that is like standard soprano tuning but with low G and low A. I love this tuning and came up with it to use in the band as it complemented the sound of Jim's soprano and concert ukes. I later realised that the tuning was used on tenor uke by Cliff Edwards, I have a tenor in this tuning but it does not sound as good as baritone. The advantage of this tuning is a lower tonal center, but the same chord shapes as a standard uke.

Here is an example of me using the low G, Low A


http://youtu.be/GxaSdWtpc94


I am playing a Favilla B1 with worth clear strings.

Patrick Madsen
02-15-2013, 12:34 PM
Great Nipper. Love those diminished chord shapes. Do you just use a low G string and tune it up to an A for the first string?

Nipper
02-15-2013, 12:48 PM
Great Nipper. Love those diminished chord shapes. Do you just use a low G string and tune it up to an A for the first string?

Thanks Patrick

The uke was made for diminished chords, and 6ths and minor 7ths... oh I love a well voiced uke chord.

Indeed I do.

pdxuke
02-15-2013, 01:26 PM
Thanks Patrick

The uke was made for diminished chords, and 6ths and minor 7ths... oh I love a well voiced uke chord.

Indeed I do.

Love the sound. Bravo. So I'm understanding, you use these strings:
http://elderly.com/accessories/names/worth-cb-baritone-uke-set--WSCB.htm

..and use two sets; you use both low G strings on the 1st and 4th strings, but tune the 1st string up to A. The other strings in the set are linear as usual. I'm a little confused as to how you are getting GceA tuning.

Is there any better rhythm instrument than a barry? And I'm digging your Favilla as much as I'm digging mine!

Nipper
02-15-2013, 01:58 PM
Love the sound. Bravo. So I'm understanding, you use these strings:
http://elderly.com/accessories/names/worth-cb-baritone-uke-set--WSCB.htm

..and use two sets; you use both low G strings on the 1st and 4th strings, but tune the 1st string up to A. The other strings in the set are linear as usual. I'm a little confused as to how you are getting GceA tuning.

Is there any better rhythm instrument than a barry? And I'm digging your Favilla as much as I'm digging mine!

I use those strings. They are rated DGBE so here's how it works. The D string is tuned up to make it a G, sounds like it would be too much tension but it works for me. (This will not work with a wound string like you find in an Aquila set or with the Worth browns as the higher tension will rip the bridge off/damage the neck). The B becomes the c. The E is the e and that leaves a G which becomes the A.
D=G
G=A
B=c
E=e

It is tricky but with the Worth Clears it works for me. I have done this on the Favilla and a Regal also a Kala and my electric baritone the "Louise Brooks". All have had no issues with neck or Bridge movement.

However, try this tuning at your own risk. I cannot accept any responsibility if you damage your ukes with the higher tension.

On my tenor uke I get this tuning with a set of lowG strings and an extra lowG string.

pdxuke
02-15-2013, 06:25 PM
Nipper:

Southcoast Strings offers this tuning in their cuatro string set: http://www.southcoastukes.com/cuatro.htm

southcoastukes
02-16-2013, 11:48 AM
Nipper:

Southcoast Strings offers this tuning in their cuatro string set: http://www.southcoastukes.com/cuatro.htm

Thanks for putting out the tip, Thom. We had always offered a traditional Cuatro set: all plain strings, and on a Baritone it would give the traditional Cuatro tuning of a - d' - f# - b. When we re-did the string site, we added a set for "a step down" tuning, or in other words, one that gives g c' e' a on a Baritone.

It wasn't hard to do - we already had a very popular linear C tuning all plain set. We just changed the 1st string to make it the "LMC-NW" set (Light Medium Cuatro - no wound). At the same time, if you're buying the Linear set anyway, there's an option to add an extra 1st string to try the Cuatro set-up. We even make a version of it with two very smooth polished wound strings (on the outside).

You can hear when Nipper plays it, that if you want a lot of depth out of a C tuning on a Baritone, this is the way to go. Your picking will be different, as the highest notes are now in the middle, but if you happen to have more than one Baritone (Thom), like to play in C, and want to make one of your instruments a full bodied rhythm instrument, you can step right into this with no adjustment at all.

clayton56
02-16-2013, 05:45 PM
I have tried an octave below C with special strings, I think they were the middle four of a guitar set but one with a stiffer top string, I'd have to figure it out again. Interesting but ultimately useless - I just don't like low tuning on the fourth string.

So now I have it tuned to A re-entrant using my fishing line recipe string, same strings that I use for soprano and concert. Sounds pretty. Strings are, from high to low, F#, C#, A, E. Should work with any soprano set that is long enough.