PDA

View Full Version : sinker redwood



Stevelele
03-06-2013, 04:38 PM
Anyone know where I can buy some nice straight grained sinker redwood for a tenor soundboard? It's pretty tough to find this for an ukulele!

soupking
03-06-2013, 04:48 PM
Dude, I know I'm not helping, but drop the sinker and stick with the koa! It's a Hawaiian-made uke. Blonde koa... mmmmmmmmmmmmmm

mm stan
03-06-2013, 04:54 PM
Dude, I know I'm not helping, but drop the sinker and stick with the koa! It's a Hawaiian-made uke. Blonde koa... mmmmmmmmmmmmmm

+1 I agree to that a hundred times...he he that is good advice... you see you buy wood the luthier is not familiar with, it complicates things....good luck man
I fell for the hype.....all I can say...risky business

didgeridoo2
03-06-2013, 05:42 PM
I bought some sinker and had someone make me a uke with it. I love it. When I spoke with Eric, he mentioned how much he likes building with it. I'd probably defer to him if he's gonna build with it.

bluesuke
03-06-2013, 05:51 PM
Why sinker? I would look for real tight grain with good silk

Dan Uke
03-06-2013, 06:25 PM
Steve

You already found another luthier to make another uke?

dkcrown
03-07-2013, 01:21 AM
I know that Mike at MP ukuleles has built a number of ukes with sinker redwood. Maybe contact him about building one for you. I would also PM coolkayaker about it as he had one of Mikes sinker redwoods but I believe he sold it. There also was one for sale over at FMM a while back.

pakhan
03-07-2013, 02:37 AM
Why sinker? I would look for real tight grain with good silk

I agree, there is redwood which isn't sinker which is fabulous, like Lucky Strike!

Stevelele
03-07-2013, 04:30 AM
I'm already getting the blonde koa. But looking into sinker redwood for other possibilities


Dude, I know I'm not helping, but drop the sinker and stick with the koa! It's a Hawaiian-made uke. Blonde koa... mmmmmmmmmmmmmm

soupking
03-07-2013, 04:42 AM
I'm already getting the blonde koa. But looking into sinker redwood for other possibilities

Ah, touché! Haha. Nice, good luck with them!

KimosTherapy
03-07-2013, 05:42 AM
Ho, Bruddah Steve!

I LOVE my Van Pelt Koa/Sinker Redwood tenor uke!!! It sounds Rich, Full, & SSSUUUHHHHHWWWWEEEEEEEEEEEEEETTT!!!!:shaka:

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
03-07-2013, 05:51 AM
Anyone know where I can buy some nice straight grained sinker redwood for a tenor soundboard? It's pretty tough to find this for an ukulele!

allied luthiery
cookwoods
rctonewoods

if you buy a guitar top, you can get at least 2 tenors and 1 concert tops out of it depending on the size

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
03-07-2013, 06:05 AM
this could also work

http://www.ebay.com/itm/6-ANCIENT-REDWOOD-CLEAR-BOARDS-DARK-TIGHT-GRAIN-17X9X1-2-/150994183969?pt=Guitar_Accessories&hash=item2327f46721

hoosierhiver
03-07-2013, 06:10 AM
I sometimes wonder about "sinker" redwood.
I've been hearing about it for years, I mean how much "sunk" redwood is there in the world?

chrimess
03-07-2013, 06:18 AM
Hi Mike,
the trouble is, if it is not sunk, it's technically illegal, or in the immortal words of Monty Python (on witches in Holy Grail):
"Right! So, if she weighs the same as a duck, she'd float in water, and she must be made of wood,..."
I sometimes wonder about "sinker" redwood.
I've been hearing about it for years, I mean how much "sunk" redwood is there in the world?

Dougf
03-07-2013, 06:35 AM
I sometimes wonder about "sinker" redwood.
I've been hearing about it for years, I mean how much "sunk" redwood is there in the world?

While the sinker wood is a finite resource, there is apparently quite a lot of it. Some of those logs were huge, and I'm guessing some might yield hundreds, if not thousands of ukes. Here's a link to a story, with a pic of one of these logs. It said some logs were 16 ft in diameter.

http://www.redwoodsalvagesales.com/the-salvage-story.htm

dkcrown
03-07-2013, 06:42 AM
Hi Mike,
the trouble is, if it is not sunk, it's technically illegal, or in the immortal words of Monty Python (on witches in Holy Grail):
"Right! So, if she weighs the same as a duck, she'd float in water, and she must be made of wood,..."

"Burn Her!" :)

OldePhart
03-07-2013, 06:51 AM
I sometimes wonder about "sinker" redwood.
I've been hearing about it for years, I mean how much "sunk" redwood is there in the world?

Actually, there is quite a lot of the stuff. Unlike many softwood species redwood is very resinous and resistant to rot and damage from water. They used to log these trees by the thousands and float them down rivers to mills. A fair number of them got hung up along the way and sank, with current holding them wedged against bolders and growth along the banks. Also, a few man made lakes "drowned" a lot of forest, including quite a bit of redwood, though often that material is too deep to be easily recovered.

Actually only a fraction of what is recovered even goes for making instruments, more of it goes to furniture, cabinet making, and architectural paneling. The old redwoods were huge - you can probably get thousands of guitar sets from a single large log.

Also, it's not illegal to lumber redwood, (you can go to Lowes or Home Depot and buy all the redwood fencing and landscaping timbers you want) though most of the old growth trees with really large diameters and tight grains are in protected federal and state parks, now.

As I understand it, the real attraction of "sinker" wood for instruments, besides the tight grain of the old growth, is the changes that have taken place in the wood due to the long (usually decades) immersion in water.

John

Telperion
03-07-2013, 06:55 AM
dk,

If you're still interested, I actually happen to have a few sinker tops for tenor ukulele. I believe I have 3 book matched, and 1 one piece. They are all nice tops with good color and character. PM me if interested.

-Steve

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
03-07-2013, 07:31 AM
We occasionally find an old redwood or fir logs washed up on our remote southern shores here. Milling can tricky though because of all the sand has worked it's way into it.

hoosierhiver
03-07-2013, 07:45 AM
We occasionally find an old redwood or fir logs washed up on our remote southern shores here. Milling can tricky though because of all the sand has worked it's way into it.

That is really remarkable, the world never ceases to amaze me.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
03-07-2013, 08:26 AM
That is really remarkable, the world never ceases to amaze me.

Yeah, who knows how long they've been out there and how many times they've circled the globe before being washed ashore?

dkcrown
03-07-2013, 09:34 AM
dk,

If you're still interested, I actually happen to have a few sinker tops for tenor ukulele. I believe I have 3 book matched, and 1 one piece. They are all nice tops with good color and character. PM me if interested.

-Steve

Thanks Steve. But it is syfc that is looking for the sinker redwood, not me.

didgeridoo2
03-07-2013, 10:48 AM
Yeah, who knows how long they've been out there and how many times they've circled the globe before being washed ashore?

I thought there are redwoods on Haleakala, Chuck. Any to be found on your island?

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
03-07-2013, 11:01 AM
I thought there are redwoods on Haleakala, Chuck. Any to be found on your island?

Not that I know of but I haven't been outside for a while.
Don't redwood trees need a certain amount of fog every day?

Telperion
03-07-2013, 11:59 AM
Thanks Steve. But it is syfc that is looking for the sinker redwood, not me.

Yes, of course. Sorry, dk. Also, I was mistaken in my recollection of my stock. They are actually concert tops, not tenors.

-Steve

Dougf
03-07-2013, 12:49 PM
That is really remarkable, the world never ceases to amaze me.

There is also speculation that the Chumash Indians of California learned to make sewn-plank redwood canoes from the Hawaiians around 500-700 AD. Here's an except from wikipedia:

"Recently, linguist Kathryn A. Klar of University of California, Berkeley and archaeologist Terry L. Jones of California Polytechnic State University have proposed contacts between Polynesians and the Chumash and Gabrielino of Southern California, between 500 and 700. Their primary evidence consists of the advanced sewn-plank canoe design, which is used throughout the Polynesian Islands, but is unknown in North America — except for those two tribes. Moreover, the Chumash word for "sewn-plank canoe," tomolo'o, may have been derived from kumulaa'au, the Polynesian word for the Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) logs used in that construction."