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Kyle23
03-23-2013, 03:08 PM
Ok so I recently learned how to sing and play at the same time and was wondering what you guys all had to say about something. If you aren't a good singer, do you still confidently sing and play or do you stay away from singing and playing? If you are a good singer, do you care if people aren't very good singers when they play? For those of you who can't sing well, do you just work with whatcha got and rock out? I've been following the Seasons of the Uke threads and I noticed that a lot of you are pretty good singers and I know I'm not the only average singer here so I was trying to figure out if the "average" singers aren't posting videos, am I missing the average singers videos, or am I really the only bad one haha. What are your thoughts on this?

OldePhart
03-23-2013, 03:33 PM
I find that my playing changes completely when I am also singing - and it doesn't matter what instrument. On uke I can do really nice arpeggios and stuff until I start singing - the moment I start singing I drop into a very simple strummed accompaniment and that seems to be all I can manage. If I try to sing while I am playing bass I inevitably end up crashing and burning.

I think when I sing that that part of the music takes over my brain so I can only do relatively simple things with my hands.l

I'm honestly probably a little better singer than instrumentalist (though I'm nobody's hero on either) but I've seriously considered giving up the singing to concentrate on being a better picker.

I don't know if this came close to answering your question - but the bottom line is to have fun and do what you feel you need to. :)

Most people are harder on themselves than they really should be, especially as regards voice. Part of this is because what we hear in our heads when we sing is not what everybody else hears or what gets picked up by a microphone. The first time I sang using a PA with monitors was absolutely dreadful - I kept trying to make what was coming out of the monitors sound like the "me" that I hear in my head with bone conduction and so on and the result was predictably awful. Since, I've learned to either ignore the monitor entirely or treat it as if it were another person singing with me and as long as what I hear is on pitch I'm happy with that. :)

Finally, when it comes to "good" voices vs. "bad" voices a lot depends on several factors - some of which are necessary and some of which are optional. The most important factor is to be on key - put your initial efforts into developing your ear so you know when you are on pitch or off pitch. It doesn't matter what a wonderful crooner you are if your twenty cents off pitch or reaching for notes that you can't get to with a ladder.

That is 90% of the battle. However, that last ten percent is often the difference between a singer that people can tolerate and one that they will go out of their way to hear. I know a semi-pro singer/songwriter who writes wonderful songs but the poor gal insists on singing them herself. She is perfectly on pitch pretty much 100% of the time - but her voice is just dreadful - she sounds like a wife nagging in key. Honestly, if she was doing hard blues or rock she might do well but for the stuff she writes nobody buys her albums because there is a complete disconnect between the timbre of her voice and the material she is singing and the accompaniment she is using.

Finally, most beginning males tend to sing below their ideal range and most beginning females tend to sing above their ideal range. Not sure what's going on there but it seems to follow. You shouldn't sing in your speaking voice, nor does your speaking voice necessarily indicate what your best singing range is. My speaking voice is very low, my best singing range seems to be high baritone to low tenor - I can occasionally pull off bass but only if they are very short supporting harmonies and not sustained notes. THe leader of our band also has a low speaking voice - speaking he can make the subwoofer rumble - his best singing voice is high tenor and he can even pull off the soprano when he needs to help the female vocalists get their harmonies down.

Lastly, I'm not a singer nor a vocal coach so please feel free to ignore absolutely everything I said above! (I did, however, pay for two years of private lessons for my oldest daughter and I learned a lot from her teacher when she thought I wasn't listening. LOL)

John

OldePhart
03-23-2013, 03:43 PM
Oh...and one thing I forgot to mention - the only way to improve as a singer is to sing. It's not something that you can learn from a book. It's not something that can be "taught" as such (the reason that most vocal teachers like the one that helped my oldest daughter tend to call themselves vocal coaches). The more you sing the more your vocal chords will stretch, improving your range. And the flip side of that is that if you stop singing your range will contract and you will find yourself back at square one. Maybe with a little better ear, but back at square one. When I was singing regularly with a small bluegrass gospel combo I was forced to raise everything to C or G for our harp player. That meant stuff I would have preferred to sing in A got raised 1-1/2 steps, etc. I actually got pretty good up there, and discovered I enjoyed it. I moved six years ago and I couldn't hit those notes now if you stuck me with a cattle prod...

Hippie Dribble
03-23-2013, 03:54 PM
my thoughts are best summed up by this gorgeous video by filipinouker...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFTqdZufAkM

"...don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear, just sing, sing a song" :)

Kyle23
03-23-2013, 04:22 PM
Phew OldePhart, that's a lot to process haha.

I sign and play as best as I can, it doesn't sound great, but it makes me happy. My dad was a singer, and I guess I didn't get the good voice gene, but I'll keep working on it and if I improve then awesome, but if I don't, I won't be too upset.

And great video, easy for her to say, she has a lovely voice haha. But I see what you mean, good philosophy.

roxhum
03-23-2013, 04:34 PM
I am not a good singer. I have a limited range, maybe one octave, or less. But I sing. I think my singing has improved. You have to find your key. For me I can't sing songs that have a large range. I sing like a rock star when home alone. I don't like to lead a song at uke group because I am self conscious about my singing but I sing along in a group. I prefer music with music notation because it helps me sing the correct notes.

Rawks
03-23-2013, 04:37 PM
Haha, I've never heard that song, Eugene. Great post!
I know from personal experience that so many people are dead terrified of singing if they think someone will hear. Personally, I love to hear anybody sing, no matter how 'bad' they think they are. I'm much better at singing than I am at playing my uke. But when I hear someone doing both at the same time, no matter what their ability, it impresses me. It's more coordination than I have!
I think that being critical of someone elses singing voice is incredibly rude. In my music classes, we had one teacher who would stop the class and give us a passionate lecture if you laughed at someone who had difficulty singing. She believed, and I agree, that singing should always be encouraged and we should go out of our way to be supportive. :)

Kyle23
03-23-2013, 04:46 PM
Haha, I've never heard that song, Eugene. Great post!
I know from personal experience that so many people are dead terrified of singing if they think someone will hear. Personally, I love to hear anybody sing, no matter how 'bad' they think they are. I'm much better at singing than I am at playing my uke. But when I hear someone doing both at the same time, no matter what their ability, it impresses me. It's more coordination than I have!
I think that being critical of someone elses singing voice is incredibly rude. In my music classes, we had one teacher who would stop the class and give us a passionate lecture if you laughed at someone who had difficulty singing. She believed, and I agree, that singing should always be encouraged and we should go out of our way to be supportive. :)

This makes me feel much better (along with roxhum's post). I upload videos to youtube of me singing and playing to my other friends on another forum I'm on only because they don't really see uke players often, so they aren't very critical on my singing lol. I'd be hesitant to post it here because you guys are somethin else I tell ya.

GASguy
03-23-2013, 04:47 PM
As a guitarist, I spent too much time not singing because I thought I was not good enough to sing in public; I kind of regret that lost time.

I sing and play out whenever I can now, and people tell me I sound good; some even say great!

I finally realized that it was not just the quality of the voice but also the energy, emotion, effort, and style expended by the performer that matters.

Look at some of my all time favorite singing guitarists, Mark Knopfler, Neil Young, Tom Petty, Bruce, Dylan, none of those guys are opera caliber singers, but as "Performers" they are among the best.

Just sing, try to stay on key and give it all you have; you will improve and if you really enjoy what you are doing your audience will also.

Nicko
03-23-2013, 04:57 PM
For me, the singing is the whole point...and I'm not a strong singer. Not to overplay a gender observation, but many men seem to approach music like it's an athletic event...with emphasis on instrumental technique. Take a look at American old-time country music -- Appalachian music: the men tended to be instrumental technicians while women tended to be the carriers of the culture in the singing of ballads, hymns, songs. I have huge respect for the songs and the singing. I wish I could sing better. I really took up the ukulele to accompany my awful singing. I used to play fiddle in a string band -- many years ago -- they never let me sing very much. Now I want to sing!

Sing like nobody's listening.

Hippie Dribble
03-23-2013, 05:02 PM
As a guitarist, I spent too much time not singing because I thought I was not good enough to sing in public; I kind of regret that lost time.

I sing and play out whenever I can now, and people tell me I sound good; some even say great!

I finally realized that it was not just the quality of the voice but also the energy, emotion, effort, and style expended by the performer that matters.

Look at some of my all time favorite singing guitarists, Mark Knopfler, Neil Young, Tom Petty, Bruce, Dylan, none of those guys are opera caliber singers, but as "Performers" they are among the best.

Just sing, try to stay on key and give it all you have; you will improve and if you really enjoy what you are doing your audience will also.

such a good post GAS. I agree with everything you said here.

Here's a little personal history: when I was a young kid I had a real, intuitive heart for music, ate it up, couldn't get enough of it, anything and everything. I spen hours in my bedroom listen9ing to the radio, tapes, and started collecting vinyl when I was 9. Mum and dad played classical stuff and country so that was part of the puzzle too. When I got to grade 5 there was an opportunity to try out for the primary school choir. I was laughed out of my audition by the teacher and the students looking on. Seriously. Maybe they didn't realise how earnest I was but it truly scarred me and I've spent the rest of my life dealing with the hang-up about not being able to sing.

As a teenager I taught myself guitar and started writing songs. never took em out of the bedroom though as I was mortified at the thought of anyone hearing me sing. By my early twenties I was so crippled with anxiety and self-consciousness something just triggered in my mind one day and I said 'who cares'....I had so much stuff to play and sing. I was desperate for feedback and I was sick of singing to myself.. Basically, I just had enough of my own navel-gazing and I thought what have I got to lose..

Fast forward twenty years and I've played for years in pubs off and on, recorded a couple of albums, even fronted my own music class as a teacher. The early days in public performance were scary, exhilirating, exciting. I used to have to take nerve pills to get me out there, but it has been a joy. The most special thing I've experienced is the connection you make with an audience. I'll never be a great singer, but the audience are more forgiving than we give them credit for. They pick up on the emotional investment of the performer, not the skill level.

My humble advice: don't spend 10 years locked in your bedroom Kyle. But when you sing, sing with all you got, like the words really means something to you. If you feel it, chances are pretty high your audiences will too. And a performance invested with your whole heart and soul breaks down all the barriers that exist. You'll be truly liberated and make some amazing connections with folks!

OldePhart
03-23-2013, 05:04 PM
This makes me feel much better (along with roxhum's post). I upload videos to youtube of me singing and playing to my other friends on another forum I'm on only because they don't really see uke players often, so they aren't very critical on my singing lol. I'd be hesitant to post it here because you guys are somethin else I tell ya.

Actually, this is probably one of the most supportive audiences you'll ever find. Folks here at UU are way more gentle than your typical denizen of a guitar forum, for example. :) In fact, it can be pretty difficult to get constructive criticism here because everyone is so anxious to put others at ease! Definitely a lot of "aloha spirit."

John

OldePhart
03-23-2013, 05:08 PM
Sing like nobody's listening.

...and dance like no one is watching...

Great advice for just about any area of life, I think.

John

Kyle23
03-23-2013, 05:13 PM
such a good post GAS. I agree with everything you said here.

Here's a little personal history: when I was a young kid I had a real, intuitive heart for music, ate it up, couldn't get enough of it, anything and everything. I spen hours in my bedroom listen9ing to the radio, tapes, and started collecting vinyl when I was 9. Mum and dad played classical stuff and country so that was part of the puzzle too. When I got to grade 5 there was an opportunity to try out for the primary school choir. I was laughed out of my audition by the teacher and the students looking on. Seriously. Maybe they didn't realise how earnest I was but it truly scarred me and I've spent the rest of my life dealing with the hang-up about not being able to sing.

As a teenager I taught myself guitar and started writing songs. never took em out of the bedroom though as I was mortified at the thought of anyone hearing me sing. By my early twenties I was so crippled with anxiety and self-consciousness something just triggered in my mind one day and I said 'who cares'....I had so much stuff to play and sing. I was desperate for feedback and I was sick of singing to myself.. Basically, I just had enough of my own navel-gazing and I thought what have I got to lose..

Fast forward twenty years and I've played for years in pubs off and on, recorded a couple of albums, even fronted my own music class as a teacher. The early days in public performance were scary, exhilirating, exciting. I used to have to take nerve pills to get me out there, but it has been a joy. The most special thing I've experienced is the connection you make with an audience. I'll never be a great singer, but the audience are more forgiving than we give them credit for. They pick up on the emotional investment of the performer, not the skill level.

My humble advice: don't spend 10 years locked in your bedroom Kyle. But when you sing, sing with all you got, like the words really means something to you. If you feel it, chances are pretty high your audiences will too. And a performance invested with your whole heart and soul breaks down all the barriers that exist. You'll be truly liberated and make some amazing connections with folks!

I think that's my problem. I hold back even when no one is in my house. I don't know why, but I can't bring myself to really do it. To me singing is one of the only things that I look at and think "I could never get better", there's something about it. It's like a mythical thing that I chase lol

Kyle23
03-23-2013, 05:15 PM
Actually, this is probably one of the most supportive audiences you'll ever find. Folks here at UU are way more gentle than your typical denizen of a guitar forum, for example. :) In fact, it can be pretty difficult to get constructive criticism here because everyone is so anxious to put others at ease! Definitely a lot of "aloha spirit."

John

I know, these forums are amazing. Thinking about posting the video in here for some critiquing, but still a little hesitant. I posted one video a couple weeks ago, but I was messing around on that one. This one I actually tried, and it's not much better.

Hippie Dribble
03-23-2013, 05:17 PM
I think that's my problem. I hold back even when no one is in my house. I don't know why, but I can't bring myself to really do it. To me singing is one of the only things that I look at and think "I could never get better", there's something about it. It's like a mythical thing that I chase lol

brother I know what you mean. I was the same for years and have lived with those thoughts and inner voices telling me how shit I am.... But don't give up man, stick at it. the more you do it, the easier it will become and eventually it will start to feel quite natural. It'll take time mate, but you'll get there. Just persist.
:cheers:

Kyle23
03-23-2013, 05:18 PM
brother I know what you mean. I was the same for years and have lived with those thoughts and inner voices telling me how shit I am.... But don't give up man, stick at it. the more you do it, the easier it will become and eventually it will start to feel quite natural. It'll take time mate, but you'll get there. Just persist.
:cheers:

Thanks a lot! I will surely keep this in mind.

And I just noticed this. I didn't attempt to copy the colors in your sig. I just made the letters the color my ukuleles were for each word haha.

Hippie Dribble
03-23-2013, 05:22 PM
Thanks a lot! I will surely keep this in mind.

And I just noticed this. I didn't attempt to copy the colors in your sig. I just made the letters the color my ukuleles were for each word haha.

we both have good taste. :old: I'm a child of the 70's mate...orange and brown forever :p

OldePhart
03-23-2013, 05:24 PM
I think that's my problem. I hold back even when no one is in my house. I don't know why, but I can't bring myself to really do it. To me singing is one of the only things that I look at and think "I could never get better", there's something about it. It's like a mythical thing that I chase lol

That's one thing you have to get past, for sure. Even someone with a good voice and good pitch control will not sound "good" when they are holding back. You have to really let go and sing for yourself, basically. Sing confidently, even through the mistakes. Most of us tend to choke back when we sense ourselves going off pitch. If you're singing with a group that's probably good for the group, but if you're going it solo you have to push on through and get your voice out there before you can correct it. Otherwise, you're just singing off pitch and timidly. :)

One thing that might help is this - if you are singing solo for others, even just family members, you're already doing something that probably less than 5% of the population has done in their adult lives. If you're singing solo on a publicly posted video, you're doing something that probably less than .0001% of the adult population has ever done.

Maybe it's because I've gotten close to being old enough to claim approaching senility but I've reached that point where I just really don't care if somebody considers anything I do embarrassing or worthy of embarrassement - but I'm still sane enough to know that some of my videos fall well into that category. :)

As long as I'm having fun that's really all that matters.

John

Rawks
03-23-2013, 05:33 PM
I know, these forums are amazing. Thinking about posting the video in here for some critiquing, but still a little hesitant. I posted one video a couple weeks ago, but I was messing around on that one. This one I actually tried, and it's not much better.

When you're ready to share, I'm sure we'd love to hear it!
I can honestly tell you that, the best way to get over public performance nerves is to perform frequently. And I recommend starting with your peers (that is, us!).
But do it in your own time. We understand, starting is the hardest part. :)

Kyle23
03-23-2013, 05:34 PM
That's one thing you have to get past, for sure. Even someone with a good voice and good pitch control will not sound "good" when they are holding back. You have to really let go and sing for yourself, basically. Sing confidently, even through the mistakes. Most of us tend to choke back when we sense ourselves going off pitch. If you're singing with a group that's probably good for the group, but if you're going it solo you have to push on through and get your voice out there before you can correct it. Otherwise, you're just singing off pitch and timidly. :)

One thing that might help is this - if you are singing solo for others, even just family members, you're already doing something that probably less than 5% of the population has done in their adult lives. If you're singing solo on a publicly posted video, you're doing something that probably less than .0001% of the adult population has ever done.

Maybe it's because I've gotten close to being old enough to claim approaching senility but I've reached that point where I just really don't care if somebody considers anything I do embarrassing or worthy of embarrassement - but I'm still sane enough to know that some of my videos fall well into that category. :)

As long as I'm having fun that's really all that matters.

John

I'll also keep all of this in mind. I still have a ton of fun while singing badly, so it doesn't bother me all too much, but of course I wish I was good. Next I will try singing to me family, hopefully they don't disown me haha

Kyle23
03-23-2013, 05:39 PM
When you're ready to share, I'm sure we'd love to hear it!
I can honestly tell you that, the best way to get over public performance nerves is to perform frequently. And I recommend starting with your peers (that is, us!).
But do it in your own time. We understand, starting is the hardest part. :)

You're too nice to say no to. Here it is.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYNu6ChfxRM

uke4ia
03-23-2013, 05:40 PM
I have an average voice, and I have to work at it just to be average. For years, I was writing songs as my hobby. I figured someday someone with a good voice would come along and sing my songs. And suddenly I was getting into my late 40s, with some songs nearly 30 years old that felt like golden oldies to me, except maybe 5 people had ever heard them. I realized if I didn't work up the guts to play them for people, no one would ever hear them.

So for my mid-life crisis I started playing in front of people when I could get the chance. And I found that singing and playing together is something that takes a lot of work. Remembering the lyrics, remembering the chord changes, doing a good performance of both, and syncing the two up -- that takes skill and lots of practice. Doing a little quiet singing to yourself while you practice is nothing remotely compared to actually singing an entire song while you play, and getting every word right and projected like you're singing to an audience.

There are vocal warm-up exercises you can do that will improve your tone (somewhat) and range. These are mostly geared around getting you to sing while making your diaphragm do the work instead of your throat, and to visualize your voice as coming out of the top of your skull. The idea is to minimize the stress you put on your vocal chords. You can probably find these kind of exercises on YouTube. I have a half-hour warm-up I do before I go to an open mic. I'll do as much of it as time permits before I make a video, especially if there's notes higher than an E in the song.

Papa Tom
03-23-2013, 05:50 PM
I think the uke is the one instrument that gives you license to NOT be a great singer. My main instrument was drums and I was always very confident in my playing, but I wouldn't dare sing because my voice wasn't up to par with my drumming. Singing with the uke, my voice is much more out front, so you'd think I'd be even more shy about it. However, there's something about the tenderness of a uke, accompanied by a mediocre voice, that's just magical.

Kyle23
03-23-2013, 06:08 PM
I think the uke is the one instrument that gives you license to NOT be a great singer. My main instrument was drums and I was always very confident in my playing, but I wouldn't dare sing because my voice wasn't up to par with my drumming. Singing with the uke, my voice is much more out front, so you'd think I'd be even more shy about it. However, there's something about the tenderness of a uke, accompanied by a mediocre voice, that's just magical.

That's a good way to look at it. I wonder why that is... I guess everything just sounds good with a uke.

bbqribs
03-23-2013, 07:58 PM
It is harder to play ukulele when I add singing. If I play without singing, I realize how weak my playing is. It's definitely easier for me to sing than play, but I love to do both together, and it makes it easier to learn music.
I think it's great when everyone sings out fearlessly, and I especially like it when I get to play with vocal harmonies.

Nicko
03-24-2013, 04:35 AM
I always find myself out of breath when I least expect it. That's my biggest singing challenge...of the many.

Which reminds me that some of us who may be getting closer and closer to being " of a certain age" will also realize health benefits from singing!

Singing is a tonic for both body and soul!

Kem
03-24-2013, 05:28 AM
I have an okay voice. It's untrained and sometimes does things I don't want it to do. Because I also have a good ear, I can hear myself going off pitch. It would probably be more fun to be oblivious of my own deficiencies, but at least I can work towards minimising them, if not correcting them entirely. However, I did lack confidence in my voice for quite a long time (and realistically still do, though I pretend I don't). When I was a kid, people told me I was a good singer, but when I got older, they stopped fudging the truth. A woman in my band once informed me outright that I didn't have the volume to be a soloist and should just remain in the background, and for the most part, that's what I've done ever since. I've written songs since my teens (I'm 38), but I've kept them to myself.

Recently, however, I've discovered that people like my songs. They even like hearing me singing them, and they're willing to forgive the fact that I don't sound anything like a professional. It probably helps that most of my songs are amusing (or attempt to be). What has really helped with my tendency to choke off my own voice is a sort of devil-may-care attitude. I no longer care how silly I look or sound. In fact, with many songs, the sillier my performance, the more enthusiastically audiences react. It's a principle that works for teaching or acting as well. If you're constantly worried about looking stupid, you'll shut yourself down and, well, look stupid.

People who have problems singing and playing at the same time may find that practice helps...and I don't mean that to sound trite. If you become really familiar with a particular song, you may find that you will eventually be able to devote less time to worrying about your voice and more to doing complex stuff with your fingers.

One further thought: one problem more or less unique to female ukulele players is that our voices are on approximately the same register as our instruments. I'm not a particularly loud singer; I find that even when I belt, my voice may be drowned out by my tiny instrument. In fact, I performed yesterday, and the sound guy loudly observed to the audience that I needed a mic...but my ukulele didn't. (It was a very relaxed audience full of people who knew each other, so there was a lot of gentle ribbing and joking around.)

Johnny GDS
03-24-2013, 05:38 AM
I can tell you without a doubt that singing is a good thing no matter what. The more you do it the better you will be.

It also helps you become a better player because you are essentially practicing "multi-tasking" mentally when you sing and play, which will help out even when you aren't singing.

For example, the less of your mental CPU you have to use to play, the more you can pay attention to what is happening around you (especially in a group or band setting). This allows you to focus less on your playing (while still playing accurately) and engage more musically.

I guess that is just a bi-product of practicing singing and playing, but still a good reason to keep it up. Even if you never get to the point where you feel super confident singing in public or posting vids of yourself singing and playing, it will still help you to here melodic lines and chords better because your ear will develop along with your technique.

Also the other side of the coin is you may develop into a great singer over time. The best singer I know told me that if you told him 10 years ago that he would be fronting a successful band as a great singer he would have not even thought it possible. Consistency over time (as well as enjoying the process) is a pretty powerful tool!

bonesigh
03-24-2013, 05:54 AM
I agree with Johnny GDS. The more you sing the better you will be. Keep it up. I personally don't care if someone is not a great singer as long as they are having fun, that's all that counts.

ChaosToo
03-24-2013, 06:31 AM
When I played drums in a few bands, I've always done the higher harmony parts and by the nature of having to get to high notes and hear myself over my kit, I've always gone for it, which has kept me in pitch (to a fashion). Playing with my uke, I can feel myself singing more quietly, and I know I get pitchy when I do that and even sing a whole octave lower.....my wife has commented that I'm not 'letting myself go' when she's seen the videos and I can see exactly what she's saying.....

But, to be honest, even though I feel slightly embarrassed singing along to my uke and tend to hide away when I do it (or make sure I'm alone in the house), I don't play or sing with any sort of idea that I'm good, bad or indifferent - I just do it because it's a bit of fun. Give it another few years and I might start feeling a little more comfortable and get into it a bit more - but for now, it's just a bit of a laugh :D

PeteyHoudini
03-24-2013, 10:20 AM
Learning to sing and play at the same time takes some practise. I remember it NOT being easy when I was about 13 years old. It was almost as hard as learning to play the guitar with a strap, standing up. Let's not even add singing into that mix. They all take lots of hard work.

The quality of uke players' voices doesn't bother me at all in their videos. Most I've seen here are sounding good. However, when one is reading the text as they are singing and playing the uke and they haven't practised much, that doesn't sound or look good. A pinch of confidence shows.

Singing lessons are nice if you want to learn to breath properly and stand properly amongst other vocal technqiues, etc. Just like sitting down at the piano, non piano players sit instinctively wrong too close. There are some basic things to learn that can help out.

Most people (including myself) have learned to sing by listening to songs we like and we try to play or sing like them. Later on, we might end up writing our own songs.

Petey

UkeKiddinMe
03-24-2013, 11:02 AM
This is a very encouraging thread.

I haven't sang in front of anyone in a very long time. Since I was a kid.
I'm a middle aged guy now.

As a child, I was thought to have a *good* voice, whatever that means. I got the solos in the plays in elementary school.
When I was graduating elementary school, I was one of 4 kids picked to do some singing at the graduation ceremony. At the time, my voice was changing. Our music teacher started working with the 4 of us. He had me sing something solo during the rehearsal. My voice cracked,
and I couldn't handle the key. He said: "What happened to your voice?" At that point, everything we worked on for the graduation ceremony was the 4 of us singing together, with no solos, to cover up for me.

From that point on, I pretty much never sang in public again. As I have gotten older, I have noticed more of my vocal range die away.
For a long time, I have considered myself unworthy of singing in public.

Sure would like to, though.

Kyle23
03-24-2013, 11:12 AM
I always find myself out of breath when I least expect it. That's my biggest singing challenge...of the many.

Which reminds me that some of us who may be getting closer and closer to being " of a certain age" will also realize health benefits from singing!

Singing is a tonic for both body and soul!
This was a big thing for me at first. I'd pretty much forget to breathe. I guess my brain couldn't handle that much multitasking!

UkerDanno
03-24-2013, 12:14 PM
my thoughts are best summed up by this gorgeous video by filipinouker...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFTqdZufAkM

"...don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear, just sing, sing a song" :)

does anyone know where to get the chords and words for that song?

Hippie Dribble
03-24-2013, 12:26 PM
does anyone know where to get the chords and words for that song?

hey Dan, here it is
http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/c/carpenters/sing_sing_a_song_crd.htm
there's a transposing function to make the key friendlier if you need to!

UkerDanno
03-24-2013, 12:27 PM
When I first started, inspired by IZ and his Rainbow/Wonderful medley, I was just working on playing the chords. Even after joining a Uke club, I was mostly focused on playing and happy. After a while I started to sing a little and practice at home playing and singing, and realized it was fun even at home alone! My singing is probably pretty bad, kind of like a cross between Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson...but, oh well! I enjoy it and if anyone doesn't like it they can tune out, I guess.

UkerDanno
03-24-2013, 12:39 PM
hey Dan, here it is
http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/c/carpenters/sing_sing_a_song_crd.htm
there's a transposing function to make the key friendlier if you need to!

thanks, but that has a lot of chords I don't really know and/or have trouble with! Even with the translate function...

Rawks
03-24-2013, 01:09 PM
You're too nice to say no to. Here it is.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYNu6ChfxRM

Wow, good on you for taking the chance! You've done a lot of real good things in there! :)
Your uke groove is solid and your tempo is steady. You're right on top of your entrances for each line too. Your pitch was a little off but that's not always a bad thing. For the most part, I think you got away with it. ;) I've never heard the song before but you were close enough that I could sing the melody back after you.

Thank you for sharing with us!

Kem
03-24-2013, 01:13 PM
thanks, but that has a lot of chords I don't really know and/or have trouble with! Even with the translate function...

Think of it as a way of expanding your knowledge of fun chords. You don't have to master it immediately. The song itself is even telling you that (in a way).

Kyle23
03-24-2013, 01:38 PM
Wow, good on you for taking the chance! You've done a lot of real good things in there! :)
Your uke groove is solid and your tempo is steady. You're right on top of your entrances for each line too. Your pitch was a little off but that's not always a bad thing. For the most part, I think you got away with it. ;) I've never heard the song before but you were close enough that I could sing the melody back after you.

Thank you for sharing with us!

Really appreciate it. Gunna stick with it and hopefully improve.

FreddyMac
03-24-2013, 02:38 PM
as a singer songwriter and musician i am my worst critic. im the guy that thinks his voice sucks but have to sing in public because thats what i do. im humble and not as confident as most others that do it. but on the flip side there are people that think they can sing and do so because people dont have the heart to tell them that singing is not their calling. i get the opinions of people that i trust will give me an honest opinion like my wife. she is straight up. sometimes when i think i did good and had a good show she puts me in my place to let me know what she thought wasnt good and for the most part is right. so this being said and if you come to the conclusion that your good enough for public viewing go for it but if not then i wouldnt post and wait til improvement happens. when i watch a video and the music is medeocre or better, i will listen to it but if the singing is bad i will move on because its not moving me and is hard to listen to. but maybe thats just me. i dont see a reason to listen to a bad singer unless its humerous..
edit. i just saw your video. wasnt bad. not mind blowing either but when you record and people see it, later on they can see the improvements. when i say i cant listen to bad, i mean bad like embarrassing bad. LoL

OldePhart
03-24-2013, 03:30 PM
@Kyle23 - just realized I forgot to remark on your video - sorry! It wasn't bad at all for a first effort. I've seen far worse from folks who've been posting videos for a long time. It was fairly obvious that you were kind of holding back - I'm guessing you were trying to avoid being heard by others in the house. I think you'll find that to really get your best out there you will need to push a little harder with your diaphragm and just let the volume go where it will. When I'm recording a video most often my wife knows even if she is in the master bedroom at the other end of the house... :)

It sounded like you were singing right around your speaking voice and I bet that when all is said and done and you've been doing it a while you will probably find that your best key is maybe a step above where you were - but it's hard to say because it might just be that you were holding back trying to keep the volume down. BTW, very few people, even among pros, can sing their best at low volume - you need to get the diaphragm involved and that's very difficult to do without pushing a little.

Oh...one other thing...I'm guessing you might still be in school - if singing is really something that interests you see if you can get involved in choir, there. You'll learn a lot from even a semester of choir.

John

Kyle23
03-24-2013, 03:53 PM
There wasn't anyone home during it, but yeah I don't even push it out when I'm home alone. I'm not in school and I don't really have much interest in singing per say, but I like to sing when I play for fun. I do sing a lot when I'm listening to music and in the shower, but that's about it haha. I just have to find where my voice sounds best, but I'm not too worried about it now.

arpie
03-24-2013, 04:52 PM
Nothing wrong with that video, Kyle! Matter of fact, t is great! Congratulations on going public! Great song too! Terrific playing ....... great package, really. I think that when you 'open up' a little more (sing a little louder .....) that you'll come back on pitch & be perfect!!

The more you sing out loud, the more confidence you will get - the more confidence you ...... you won't mind singing out loud! :)

Well done

Roberta

My voice used to be 'ok' - but after 40 years of not using it, it is now a bit strangulated ....... but i still belt it out with the others!

Kyle23
03-24-2013, 05:05 PM
Nothing wrong with that video, Kyle! Matter of fact, t is great! Congratulations on going public! Great song too! Terrific playing ....... great package, really. I think that when you 'open up' a little more (sing a little louder .....) that you'll come back on pitch & be perfect!!

The more you sing out loud, the more confidence you will get - the more confidence you ...... you won't mind singing out loud! :)

Well done

Roberta

My voice used to be 'ok' - but after 40 years of not using it, it is now a bit strangulated ....... but i still belt it out with the others!
I really appreciate the kind words. I'll try to open up a bit more next video.

byjimini
03-25-2013, 07:31 AM
I don't think anyone can help someone become a 'good' singer, but there's steps you can take to become more relaxed and comfortable with your voice, which in turn helps you stay in tune with the song and the instrument. At least, that's my excuse ;)

- video yourself playing and singing; most likely you'll be playing too loud and drowning yourself out, so keep adjusting until you can hear yourself and the uke clearly at the same time.

- see if you can make out what you're singing on the video. I was quite embarrassed to see myself fidgeting and mumbling my words, so I made a conscious effort to sing louder and clearer.

- Fiddle around with the key of a song, or use a capo, to suit your voice. Some chords feel impossible to play to suit your voice, but that's what practice is for.

This is the issue I have with the stuff like X-Factor, they're singing the songs in the original key. Most musicians will drop or raise the key to suit themselves, or alter it a tiny bit so they adjust their voice to the song.

Anyways, those are the things that helped me feel more comfortable with singing and playing at the same time. :)

Nicko
03-25-2013, 07:45 AM
- video yourself playing and singing; most likely you'll be playing too loud and drowning yourself out, so keep adjusting until you can hear yourself and the uke clearly at the same time.

You mean I should tone down my "all fortissimo all the time!" approach to accompaniment?

pulelehua
03-25-2013, 09:55 AM
I teach music at a secondary school, and so inevitably do lots of singing. I can sing ok. If I could work on something, it would be my tone. In technical terms, I'm not resonating the way I'd like, but I've sung quite a lot in front of people and no rotten tomatoes yet. ;)

When people ask me about singing, I usually say something along the lines of, "Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix and Lightnin' Hopkins are three of my favourite singers. Not one of them could sing their way out of a wet paper bag. But what they could do was perform." Hendrix didn't like any of his singing until his 3rd album. Talk about being your own worst critic.

Find a way to perform the song, to express it. The singing chops will follow in time.

finkdaddy
03-25-2013, 11:20 AM
First of all, I have to admit that I did not read this whole thread. I just read the title and the OP's first post/question, so I hope I'm not repeating something or saying something that is no longer relevent to the thread.

I'm almost 44 years old and have been a musician and vocalist since I was about 14. My experience is that it truly does not matter if you are a "good" or "bad" singer. In fact, I don't believe there is such a thing. To me all that matters is confidence and conviction.
Trust me; there were, and are, many singers that do not have a typically nice voice, but are beloved and popular because they sing with confidence and conviction. They belt out lyric and melody in a way that makes you believe that they believe what they are doing with every fiber in their being, and that makes all the difference.
Just write your song, play it, and sing it with all the confidence and conviction you can muster and people will love it!

Just as an example, one of my favorite singer/songwriters is Isaac Brock from Modest Mouse. He does not have a voice most people would call pleasant, but he exudes confidence in what he sings and I can't get enough of it.

~Fred

Uncle Rod Higuchi
03-25-2013, 11:49 AM
nice thread.

Thanks everybody for the information and encouragement!

I hope more and more of us will challenge ourselves to sing and play,
at least at home, and perhaps in public - open mics among other ukulele-
playing friends, or simply out in public - busking even! :)

keep uke'in',

Kyle23
03-25-2013, 12:22 PM
I teach music at a secondary school, and so inevitably do lots of singing. I can sing ok. If I could work on something, it would be my tone. In technical terms, I'm not resonating the way I'd like, but I've sung quite a lot in front of people and no rotten tomatoes yet. ;)

When people ask me about singing, I usually say something along the lines of, "Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix and Lightnin' Hopkins are three of my favourite singers. Not one of them could sing their way out of a wet paper bag. But what they could do was perform." Hendrix didn't like any of his singing until his 3rd album. Talk about being your own worst critic.

Find a way to perform the song, to express it. The singing chops will follow in time.
I know exactly what you mean. Take Ukulele Mike for example. I don't think he has a great singing voice, but the WAY he sings just makes me happy if that makes any sense hahaha

barefootgypsy
03-25-2013, 01:23 PM
nice thread.

Thanks everybody for the information and encouragement!

I hope more and more of us will challenge ourselves to sing and play,
at least at home, and perhaps in public - open mics among other ukulele-
playing friends, or simply out in public - busking even! :)

keep uke'in',I agree, nice thread, I've read it all. Kyle, well done for taking that step with the video - the uke was solid and the singing is getting there! Being in tune, on the right note is definitely the most important thing with singing. Think and hear the first note in your head before you start... the more you do that the more you will improve! I've always loved singing, sung in choirs and in the chorus of an amateur operatic society - but although I have a wide range, pitch-wise, I'm conscious that I don't have a good voice, so I'm always nervous of singing alone - even at home on my own, I have to persuade myself to really sing out. I don't mind singing out loudly when I'm confident that my voice will be lost among all the others! I agree that singing the words from the heart, with honesty, is a good thing. I've been on a singing weekend with GOOD singers, who made the point that when you sing for people you are really giving of yourself.... and I think that's true. That's why it's harder to play at the same time. I took the plunge last weekend and was persuaded to sing and play on stage for the first time. I don't know whether it'll be the last - I think I got away with it - just. The nerves showed in the voice. Someone video'd it.... and I don't know whether to share! You see, you are not alone with your concerns about singing - but do it, and it will get better, especially if you work on hitting those notes spot-on. A few lessons with a singing teacher could be all you need to really crack it!

rem50
03-25-2013, 01:43 PM
Singing is like art. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder/hearer in this case. I have been at open mics with singers that were "inexperienced". While there, I heard some people in the crowd say they were fantastic! I am not good at singing in my own eyes but I have some people who say I am good. It is all personal opinion. Just sing and have fun. When you start getting paid to do it then get concerned how you sound! :)

rem50
03-25-2013, 02:02 PM
this was wonderful! Thanks for posting it Jon

my thoughts are best summed up by this gorgeous video by filipinouker...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFTqdZufAkM

"...don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear, just sing, sing a song" :)

Sporin
03-25-2013, 02:18 PM
Confidence and enthusiasm beats textbook perfection. I'm happy to say that most folks around me just really enjoy seeing other folks make music.

Hochapeafarm
03-25-2013, 10:01 PM
I LOVED this post, Eugene Ukulele! You are truly, truly a source of great inspiration -- wonderful, superb advice that is absolutely spot-on! I am always so worried about how I sound -- when I sing or play -- but, generally, the fun that I have doing both more so typically outweighs my worries/fears. I know that I am not a good singer or player, but because I love both so much and practice and play so much, I know that I can -- and will -- improve. For example, when I started to play uke in Dec. 2011, I knew NOTHING. I couldn't even play Mary Had a Little Lamb on my uke...and singing it while playing it? Nope, couldn't do that at all either. One thing I picked up on from Al Wood's Ukulele For Dummies book was his suggestion to video oneself playing -- for me, it's kind of like a visual uke diary/journal and a way to show myself -- hey, you HAVE improved -- and that feels very rewarding to me. Now I can play some songs and sort of "carry a tune" -- that makes me so very happy -- that's all that matters to me and why I do this. :-)


such a good post GAS. I agree with everything you said here.

Here's a little personal history: when I was a young kid I had a real, intuitive heart for music, ate it up, couldn't get enough of it, anything and everything. I spen hours in my bedroom listen9ing to the radio, tapes, and started collecting vinyl when I was 9. Mum and dad played classical stuff and country so that was part of the puzzle too. When I got to grade 5 there was an opportunity to try out for the primary school choir. I was laughed out of my audition by the teacher and the students looking on. Seriously. Maybe they didn't realise how earnest I was but it truly scarred me and I've spent the rest of my life dealing with the hang-up about not being able to sing.

As a teenager I taught myself guitar and started writing songs. never took em out of the bedroom though as I was mortified at the thought of anyone hearing me sing. By my early twenties I was so crippled with anxiety and self-consciousness something just triggered in my mind one day and I said 'who cares'....I had so much stuff to play and sing. I was desperate for feedback and I was sick of singing to myself.. Basically, I just had enough of my own navel-gazing and I thought what have I got to lose..

Fast forward twenty years and I've played for years in pubs off and on, recorded a couple of albums, even fronted my own music class as a teacher. The early days in public performance were scary, exhilirating, exciting. I used to have to take nerve pills to get me out there, but it has been a joy. The most special thing I've experienced is the connection you make with an audience. I'll never be a great singer, but the audience are more forgiving than we give them credit for. They pick up on the emotional investment of the performer, not the skill level.

My humble advice: don't spend 10 years locked in your bedroom Kyle. But when you sing, sing with all you got, like the words really means something to you. If you feel it, chances are pretty high your audiences will too. And a performance invested with your whole heart and soul breaks down all the barriers that exist. You'll be truly liberated and make some amazing connections with folks!

csibona
03-26-2013, 07:51 AM
I sing along to many songs when I listen to music - but I definitely can not sing well. And, I don't think I'm improving. Most of the time it is OK for me to sing - in the sense that I'm not bothering anyone - but I really can't sing in a group as there may be people there who can sing - and my singing isn't going to help anyone do anything. My wife doesn't like when I sing when she is singing because she can't her herself and I'm just singing seemingly random notes so she loses her ability to sing well. She will ask if can hear how far off I am, and I tell her there is no way of me knowing (that is, at least thus far, singing is a mystery - you might as well ask me to find higgs-boson). My timing, on the other hand even with jazzy swing songs from the 40s through the 60s is just fine - but who cares?

okidiver
03-27-2013, 10:52 AM
Great thread and some excellent advice in here for those learning and advancing on the strum/sing thing. My 2 cents:

Only learn songs you want to sing.

Hear a song you like to sing? Get the chords/tab, and do it! If chords/tab are too hard and you don't want to take the time to master them, move on. Out of your range? Transpond the music to get it in your range.

Singing is physical. You gotta move air over your vocal chords. Comes naturally to those of us with training, but essentially take deep breaths. Singing quiet is harder than singing medium or loud. Find your zone and slowly expand.

Practice and enjoy practicing. If time is limited, get about 10-15 songs in your sweet spot and do quick jams of 2-3 at a time, then set the uke back down. A little jamming is better than nothing. When you are done, you should be fired up and happy!

If your finger tips aren't callused, you aren't playing enough.

Finally, keep up the fire!

Nicko
03-27-2013, 11:54 AM
My lovely wife was sitting reading, with the cute little cat at her feet. Took out my Kamaka Gold Label soprano.

Nicko: "Do you mind if I play a bit?"
Mrs. Nicko: "Are you going to sing?"

And just to be clear, her tone was not a hopeful one. I'd characterize it as light dread.

:cool:

Tsani
03-28-2013, 07:52 AM
I have trouble with singing while I play. I can sing. I can play. I have a hard time doing them both at the same time, especially if the chord changes are even remotely complicated. I tend to focus on my playing since I usually perform in a group (praise band in church) and there are other people who can carry the vocals. They want me to sing more - but I can only sing if I don't have to think about what my fingers are doing. Usually I have to concentrate on the next chord change and I can't spare the attention to the vocals.

pootsie
03-28-2013, 08:15 AM
I want to take the time later to go back and read this whole thread, but I want to share something odd about my own experience.

I like to sing and play. I am not a good enough instrumentalist (YET!) to carry a song on uke alone. My voice ain't great, either, but I am happy to cut loose and suck out loud, and sometimes it sounds OK.

I also play hand drums. Dumbek mostly, and I used to play the dun-duns but I sold them.
http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=34618&d=1330803831&thumb=1
Intellectually it would seem to me that hand-drums are simpler than fingering chords while strumming.

It should (it seems to me) take up less brain-juice to go bang-bang-bang and leave more to the singing part than fingers-here-strum-now-move-fingers-strum-up-down-up-down-down while singing

But I have the hardest time playing drums and singing at the same time. It is not nearly so hard to strum and sing as it is for me to drum and sing.

Two conclusions:

1) I am wrong about how brain juice works (can any scientists help me there?)

2) Phil Collins deserves great respect even if some of his music sucks

GinnyT11
03-28-2013, 09:44 AM
My lovely wife was sitting reading, with the cute little cat at her feet. Took out my Kamaka Gold Label soprano.
Nicko: "Do you mind if I play a bit?"
Mrs. Nicko: "Are you going to sing?"

And just to be clear, her tone was not a hopeful one. I'd characterize it as light dread.


Ha ha! My adult son once said to me, "Mom, maybe you should try to sing a little softer."

DHutto
03-28-2013, 09:49 AM
Singing and playing has always come a bit natural to me. It is easier for me to stay on rhythm if I am strumming than it is if I was to play the drums. I have tried singing and playing hand drums such as the Djembe before... and it just doesn't work. The only part of singing and playing with a uke that really gets to me is when I am singing and trying to finger pick all at the same time. It's just too much for my brain to handle at times. However, I am certain that this (as with everything) will improve with practice.

My advice (and I haven't read this entire thread so forgive me if this is a broken record situation) is to practice the song without singing over and over until you feel confident that you can play without having to think too much. It will then become more natural for you to sing and play.

I think as long as you are having fun and enjoying what you are doing it doesn't matter whether or not you are an expert singer or player. Just have fun with it!

As far as posting videos goes, I haven't posted any... but that may not be a bad idea just to get some feedback..

Kem
03-28-2013, 10:43 AM
Singing and playing has always come a bit natural to me. It is easier for me to stay on rhythm if I am strumming than it is if I was to play the drums. I have tried singing and playing hand drums such as the Djembe before... and it just doesn't work. The only part of singing and playing with a uke that really gets to me is when I am singing and trying to finger pick all at the same time. It's just too much for my brain to handle at times. However, I am certain that this (as with everything) will improve with practice.

My advice (and I haven't read this entire thread so forgive me if this is a broken record situation) is to practice the song without singing over and over until you feel confident that you can play without having to think too much. It will then become more natural for you to sing and play.

I think as long as you are having fun and enjoying what you are doing it doesn't matter whether or not you are an expert singer or player. Just have fun with it!

As far as posting videos goes, I haven't posted any... but that may not be a bad idea just to get some feedback..

Heh...a few weeks ago, my band played a song that required me to sing at the same time as playing the bones AND the foot-tambourine. I then had to drop the bones and play the pennywhistle without breaking the rhythm of the tambourine. I.e., it can be done, even if it gets kind of hairy at times.

OldePhart
03-28-2013, 02:51 PM
@Pootsie - I have a similar issue with strumming uke or guitar vs. playing the bass (which is my main "gig"). I can sing while playing bass but only if I know the song really well and the bass stuff I'm doing is very simple. If the bass is any kind of syncopated or broken rhythm, or even some walks, I haven't a prayer of singing with it.

I think that doing something very rhythmically simple supports the "melodic part of the brain" for lack of a better term, while doing something rhythmically complex - which most hand drumming is - detracts from it.

That's my unscientific guess anyway, but I'm sticking to it until someone comes along with a better explanation (besides "John, you suck" which I fully accept but don't let bother me too awfully much).

John

pootsie
03-28-2013, 04:47 PM
You're too nice to say no to. Here it is.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYNu6ChfxRM

1) Kudos for the guts to post

2) your uking is getting better darn quick

3) I notice a couple times you are almost on a note but kind of wiggle around to find it (I know the feeling!) so try this: I find it helps sometimes to sing without the playing to find where the voice should be, and stick a finger in your ear to really hear where your voice is.

4) keep at it!

shugabella
03-28-2013, 06:13 PM
A person has to be completely tone deaf for me to really notice as far as videos go. but even if the person IS tone deaf i just look at the fact that they had the guts and confidence to post a video for anyone to see.

Kyle23
03-28-2013, 07:37 PM
1) Kudos for the guts to post

2) your uking is getting better darn quick

3) I notice a couple times you are almost on a note but kind of wiggle around to find it (I know the feeling!) so try this: I find it helps sometimes to sing without the playing to find where the voice should be, and stick a finger in your ear to really hear where your voice is.

4) keep at it!

Every time I have to hold a longer note, I totally lose it like half way through haha. And singing without playing doesn't really help me, I sing this song in the shower sometimes and I'm sure it sounds equally as pitchy lol. But I will keep at it for sure and continue to make videos. Hopefully I improve.

barefootgypsy
03-28-2013, 11:14 PM
Every time I have to hold a longer note, I totally lose it like half way through haha. And singing without playing doesn't really help me, I sing this song in the shower sometimes and I'm sure it sounds equally as pitchy lol. But I will keep at it for sure and continue to make videos. Hopefully I improve.Ok here's some help with that....to get singing on key, do this - most everybody does this by the way, to find the key, it's the way to do it, honestly..... before you sing, strum the last chord in the piece, slowly, perhaps a couple of times. That gives you the key that the song is in... then sing the first note of the song in your head, before you sing it out loud. Then sing it out loud, then try out the song. I know this from singing in choirs all my life.... (a natural solo performer I am not..... ) this is just to help you get singing bang on the note. :)

barefootgypsy
03-29-2013, 03:36 AM
I think that's my problem. I hold back even when no one is in my house. I don't know why, but I can't bring myself to really do it. To me singing is one of the only things that I look at and think "I could never get better", there's something about it. It's like a mythical thing that I chase lol You know, Kyle, I'm just the same! As if some ghostly being will pop out through the ceiling and say "Now just who do you think you are!" know that feeling well, but in a choir I'll sing out loud with the best of them - no-one can hear me! I would LOVE a good voice. But all we have is the voice we're given - we can learn to use it better, though. And you are young enough to learn that. About ten days ago I was persuaded up on stage with my banjo-uke to perform - first time doing that. I'd been thinking about going for it, so I had a song prepared - one where I was confident about getting through it. It's right at the lowest end of my vocal range though - a bit hard on the voice. So - I'll share that with you..... you can clearly hear the terror in the voice! It's not on my own channel; a pal video'd it on his iphone!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=udC3QiXmnFI

BlueLatitude
03-29-2013, 03:43 AM
About ten days ago I was persuaded up on stage with my banjo-uke to perform - first time doing that. I'd been thinking about going for it, so I had a song prepared - one where I was confident about getting through it. It's right at the lowest end of my vocal range though - a bit hard on the voice. So - I'll share that with you..... you can clearly hear the terror in the voice![/video]

But that was lovely!!