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View Full Version : Need Asking Price Advice on a used Kamaka soprano pineapple



nukelady
03-24-2013, 07:08 AM
I would sure appreciate some advice about the asking price on an 11-year-old Kamaka soprano pineapple for sale on a local Craigslist. I haven't seen this Kamaka posted here on the UU Marketplace. So it is local in the Pacific Northwest.

http://bellingham.craigslist.org/msg/3659593043.html

The Elderly price today for this ukulele is $845 new. Is there any advantage or disadvantage to the older one compared to a new one, assuming that the seller's description of mint condition is spot on? Is the asking price of $550 too high?

Thanks for any thoughts - I am enjoying reading the threads and learning opportunities that UU members have generously provided me so far. And my 4 purchases from UU members are already beloved members of a growing UAS obsession. The guest room is now a ukulele staging area... Back to practicing blues chord progressions. Regards! JC

Tigeralum2001
03-24-2013, 07:19 AM
I'm not a Kamaka expert, but $550 seems reasonable for a near-mint condition Pineapple to me. It is Craigslist, so ask what is the lowest price the seller will take. Inspect it and play it before handing over the cash.

There is some argument that Kamakas from the 40s and 50s sound better than the modern version, but I haven't heard that 2010s sound better than 2000s... Any Kamaka experts want to weigh in?

perep
03-24-2013, 07:34 AM
Nukelady
I looked at it and it is a great looking one. I would start with $450 offer & go up from there. Play it first
Don ,in Oregon

KentSantaBarbara
03-24-2013, 10:01 AM
I agree with Perep, $450. I have a 2010 Kamaka pineapple and it is a wonderful uke. If you can handle it and play it, then maybe you can sweeten the pot if the seller balks at the $450. But have the $450 in cash ready to go, and show it to the buyer, throw it down on the table as you look the uke over closely, feel it, smell it, play it. Bring a tuner with you, maybe even a new set of soprano strings. And if $450 doesn't do it, pull out another $20 and throw it on the pile, and so on. But, be willing to walk away. Good luck and buyer beware. Remember you do not know the history of this uke. It may have been kept in the trunk of a car in the Mojave desert for five years before this person got it. There are several conversations on UU right now, discussing the value of ukuleles. Good Luck

nukelady
03-24-2013, 12:59 PM
I agree with Perep, $450. I have a 2010 Kamaka pineapple and it is a wonderful uke. If you can handle it and play it, then maybe you can sweeten the pot if the seller balks at the $450. But have the $450 in cash ready to go, and show it to the buyer, throw it down on the table as you look the uke over closely, feel it, smell it, play it. Bring a tuner with you, maybe even a new set of soprano strings. And if $450 doesn't do it, pull out another $20 and throw it on the pile, and so on. But, be willing to walk away. Good luck and buyer beware. Remember you do not know the history of this uke. It may have been kept in the trunk of a car in the Mojave desert for five years before this person got it. There are several conversations on UU right now, discussing the value of ukuleles. Good Luck

Thanks for the great advice and suggestion to take along the tuner and strings - I would not have thought of that. I will go look for those other threads to read - I learn something every time I spend a few hours reading. Thanks all.

haolejohn
03-24-2013, 01:03 PM
I will say it is worth what it sells for. I think $550 sounds good. Even $450. Go on ebay and see what the trend is. CL finds are nice b/c they tend to be better deals and there are no fees. If there was neglect, i think it will be obvious right away. Listen for buzzing. check the intonation. Good luck.

RyanMFT
03-24-2013, 01:51 PM
I agree with the $450 range. I think $550 is around what a shop would ask for this ukulele retail. If you love it, that should be a factor in what you are willing to pay. If I give my honest opinion, I think Kamaka often cuts corners and you pay a lot for what you get. Not to say they make a bad ukulele, but there are other production ukuleles kicking their behinds. Of course, this is my opinion.

If you love the way it feels, sounds, and plays, go for it and enjoy the heck out of it.

roxhum
03-24-2013, 02:18 PM
I bought a Kamaka Pineapple a year or two ago, it was around five or six years old and I think I paid just over $500 with a nice case. I also bought a Kamaka soprano around six years old for around $400 with a case (I thought that was a very good deal). Since then Kamaka raised their prices and the used Kamaka's also went up in value. I believe the Kamaka's built in the last ten years or so are better sounding then the old Kamaka's. You are buying a lot of history and I for am a Kamaka girl all the way. Mine plays like butter and sounds wonderful. I think if the seller holds firm at $550 you are still getting a fair deal. Go for it!

Johnny GDS
03-24-2013, 03:05 PM
I would ask if he has a humidifier, cuz if he doesn't and hasn't been using one, there could be some weirdness in the fretboard or bridge area. A lot of people consider their instruments to be in "mint" condition, but don't really know how to truly evaluate that. Probably the most often overlooked thing is the use of a humidifier, and also the most common source of unseen "damage". Go take a look but bring someone with you that can really evaluate the fretboard and neck and check for wear and tear associated with a dry environment, that is if you are not comfortable doing that yourself.

That said, I've played some Kamaka pineapples that I thought were pretty good, and some not so impressive. I would definately play it first and not buy it point blank just because of pricing factors. Craigslisters usually expect some level of negotiation too, so no harm in offering what its worth to you! Good luck, post some pics if you get it!

Johnny GDS

laundromatt
03-24-2013, 05:22 PM
Depends on the condition, and how it sounds. $550 can be reasonable, $450 too.

mm stan
03-25-2013, 03:56 AM
Yes this one is an early circa 2000's model as I can see....an it probally has a better tone than the white labels..I think to me the price is where it should be and it is a fair price at that..
I would pay between 500-600 for this uke....it seems to be in pretty good condition...Good Luck, I hope it helps Happy Strummings..

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
03-25-2013, 06:01 AM
I would ask if he has a humidifier, cuz if he doesn't and hasn't been using one, there could be some weirdness in the fretboard or bridge area. A lot of people consider their instruments to be in "mint" condition, but don't really know how to truly evaluate that. Probably the most often overlooked thing is the use of a humidifier, and also the most common source of unseen "damage". Go take a look but bring someone with you that can really evaluate the fretboard and neck and check for wear and tear associated with a dry environment, that is if you are not comfortable doing that yourself.

That said, I've played some Kamaka pineapples that I thought were pretty good, and some not so impressive. I would definately play it first and not buy it point blank just because of pricing factors. Craigslisters usually expect some level of negotiation too, so no harm in offering what its worth to you! Good luck, post some pics if you get it!

Johnny GDS

Few instruments get damaged for lack of humidity in the rainy parts of Oregon and Washington---it's one of the advantages of our nine months of drizzly weather.