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View Full Version : There is big ukes small ukes side ported kasha tru and other bracing what's next???



MGM
03-25-2013, 01:19 PM
Now that we have sopraninos, then super ukes with longer necks, big bodied ukes, thin body, side ported....etc. with all these new models and configurations of 4 string 5 string 6 and 8 what's next that we are wanting....been. Talking to luthiers and running out of ideas..

ChaosToo
03-25-2013, 01:28 PM
Definitely think big bodies on concert scale necks is something I'd like. In fact, despite knowing next to nothing about luthiery, that's what I plan on building for myself......one day....... :D

hawaii 50
03-25-2013, 02:22 PM
Fluted armrest like Kevin Ryan Guitars..all for show but you asked.. LOL
and even though I know it is being done now..fretboards with super nice striping on the different types of wood..or really nice looking backstrap on the ukuleles

does any one want to build me one like that Just joking going to be expensive Haha

my 2 cents

AncientMatingCalls
03-25-2013, 02:57 PM
I'd like to see a focus on steel string acoustic ukes. It probably isn't a huge priority for any uke builders, but I think it would be very interesting. It would probably restore my as of late waning interest in the uke. It would provide for a stronger presence soundwise, which I feel is the reason I'm not playing the uke as much.

Katz-in-Boots
03-25-2013, 03:21 PM
Definitely think big bodies on concert scale necks is something I'd like. In fact, despite knowing next to nothing about luthiery, that's what I plan on building for myself......one day....... :D

Me too. I love the sound of a tenor but my fingers need the concert scale.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
03-25-2013, 04:17 PM
Definitely think big bodies on concert scale necks is something I'd like. In fact, despite knowing next to nothing about luthiery, that's what I plan on building for myself......one day....... :D

That's not a bad idea. But with the shorter scale and the necessary lighter gauged strings it still won't sound like a tenor. I don't know if extra high tension concert strings exist. It would also have to have a 15 or 16 fret body connection in order to locate the bridge in the proper location.

Dan Uke
03-25-2013, 04:50 PM
That's not a bad idea. But with the shorter scale and the necessary lighter gauged strings it still won't sound like a tenor. I don't know if extra high tension concert strings exist. It would also have to have a 15 or 16 fret body connection in order to locate the bridge in the proper location.

I would definitely buy a 16 fret body connection...Chuck you need a tester? :D

hawaii 50
03-25-2013, 05:00 PM
I would definitely buy a 16 fret body connection...Chuck you need a tester? :D


Daniel..nice try haha
you funny today...

coolkayaker1
03-25-2013, 05:10 PM
50934
......................

ChaosToo
03-26-2013, 12:39 AM
That's not a bad idea. But with the shorter scale and the necessary lighter gauged strings it still won't sound like a tenor. I don't know if extra high tension concert strings exist. It would also have to have a 15 or 16 fret body connection in order to locate the bridge in the proper location.

My idea was more to do with getting the deeper tone from the bigger body with the physical fret spacing that I've found to be most comfortable for me. I guess there's far more to it than that, but it's nice that someone other than me thinks it might be a good idea....... I presumed it had already been done at some point? OIf I start saving now Chuck, I'll be ready for you to make me one in about 10 years - is that OK? ;-p

coolkayaker1
03-26-2013, 01:48 AM
I guess there's far more to it than that, but it's nice that someone other than me thinks it might be a good idea. ;-p

Is "that's not a bad idea" the same as a good idea? :rolleyes:

One example of a larger body for neck is an Applause Ovation tenor....tenor neck, baritone size body. But, that's truly meant to be amplified.

ChaosToo
03-26-2013, 02:11 AM
Is "that's not a bad idea" the same as a good idea? :rolleyes:

One example of a larger body for neck is an Applause Ovation tenor....tenor neck, baritone size body. But, that's truly meant to be amplified.

I take it to mean the same....... :D It'll be interesting to hear more about it from those who know about such things ........

ukulelee
03-26-2013, 02:37 AM
3-string-banjolele:
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_rSalzLOfSjc/S_utCu-RKBI/AAAAAAAAAJQ/qCYUHjU3u9M/s1600/%E4%B8%89%E5%91%B3%E7%B7%9A01.jpg
LOL~

teruterubouzu
03-26-2013, 02:42 AM
3-string-banjolele:
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_rSalzLOfSjc/S_utCu-RKBI/AAAAAAAAAJQ/qCYUHjU3u9M/s1600/%E4%B8%89%E5%91%B3%E7%B7%9A01.jpg
LOL~
Aww, I want to get a shamisen one day. I love that instrument.

BlueLatitude
03-26-2013, 04:05 AM
Me too. I love the sound of a tenor but my fingers need the concert scale.

Me three. I have been wondering about that a lot lately, in fact!

Dan Uke
03-26-2013, 06:06 AM
Daniel..nice try haha
you funny today...

Haha....I beat you to it cuz you thought the same.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
03-26-2013, 06:29 AM
A builder would need to consider whether or not the shorter scale and lighter strings have enough energy to excite the top a larger body.
Think about it in the extreme: If you mounted a soprano scale neck to a baritone body, would it sound like a baritone? Probably not. Scale length, strings and body size all need to work together. Heavier strings would be needed and the baritone's top would have to be made very thin. A very thin top over the large expanse of a baritone body is asking for trouble structurally.
I honestly don't think you'd have a problem using a concert scale on a tenor body though. Minor modifications would need to be made to the body. The volume and timber would likely change but I just don't think it would sound like a full bodied tenor. Only one way to find out.

hawaii 50
03-26-2013, 06:40 AM
If you build it they will come

kissing
03-26-2013, 06:49 AM
For me, the kind of "ukulele" that is most painfully missing is a baritone ukulele with a body size (and scale length?) appropriate for its tuning.

Some may say that it's "going over to the guitar side" - but I see LOTS of potential and uses for a baritone ukulele that has a body size and scale length closer to a classical guitar.

Classical guitars have a deep, rich tone that far exceeds baritone ukuleles (although baritone ukes on the other hand are punchier).
However, I don't want to learn how to play 6-strings and turn myself into a guitarist in order to get that tone.

So far, the only luthier whom I have contacted that has given me a solution is Earnest Instruments.
But I've been quoted $2500 minimum, depending on options.
I'm looking for something a bit more mid-range in price..

If someone decides to produce this kind of ukulele, it's actually very easy and potentially inexpensive (just put a 4-string neck and headstock on a classical guitar body).
However, as such a standard instrument does not seem to exist...

grendel1972
03-26-2013, 07:39 AM
For me, the kind of "ukulele" that is most painfully missing is a baritone ukulele with a body size (and scale length?) appropriate for its tuning.

Some may say that it's "going over to the guitar side" - but I see LOTS of potential and uses for a baritone ukulele that has a body size and scale length closer to a classical guitar.

Classical guitars have a deep, rich tone that far exceeds baritone ukuleles (although baritone ukes on the other hand are punchier).
However, I don't want to learn how to play 6-strings and turn myself into a guitarist in order to get that tone.

So far, the only luthier whom I have contacted that has given me a solution is Earnest Instruments.
But I've been quoted $2500 minimum, depending on options.
I'm looking for something a bit more mid-range in price..

If someone decides to produce this kind of ukulele, it's actually very easy and potentially inexpensive (just put a 4-string neck and headstock on a classical guitar body).
However, as such a standard instrument does not seem to exist...

Aren't you just looking for a tenor guitar? Four strings and the scale is in between a bari uke and a "typical" guitar. The body may not be as large as a classical guitar body, but I think it's a very good alternative (and you can find them for a reasonable price).

Dan Uke
03-26-2013, 07:47 AM
Aren't you just looking for a tenor guitar? Four strings and the scale is in between a bari uke and a "typical" guitar. The body may not be as large as a classical guitar body, but I think it's a very good alternative (and you can find them for a reasonable price).

Can you give some recommendations...You have just picqued my curiosity!

OldePhart
03-26-2013, 08:01 AM
Okay Mike, since you asked, I want (some might even say need) a uke with a talent enhancer... :biglaugh:

John

grendel1972
03-26-2013, 08:16 AM
Can you give some recommendations...You have just picqued my curiosity!

I have a super beat up one that my brother-in-law "loaned" me (i.e., it's been so long that I'm pretty sure the loan has turned into a gift). I don't have it with me at the office, but I *think* it's a brand called Blueridge (which is nothing special). I'm not sure I would go so far as to recommend what I've got for a player of your skills, but it's definitely fun to play (and didn't cost me a dime!).

I've done a little shopping around in the past and you can find these from $200 to sky's the limit. Here (http://www.vintagetenorguitars.com/index.html) is a website with lots of great pics (heavy on vintage, as you can tell from the url and also lots of electric options). If you type in "tenor guitar" into ebay (or if you want something higher end "custom tenor guitar" into google), you'll get a lot of hits as well. Sorry I can't be of more specific help, but I know I saw one for sale on the marketplace awhile back, so hopefully someone else here can give a specific recommendation.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
03-26-2013, 09:56 AM
Can you give some recommendations...You have just picqued my curiosity!

Ah geez Daniel, why you gotta go there? :(

DewGuitars
03-26-2013, 10:20 AM
How about a uke with a fan-fret neck? (Multi-scale)

hawaii 50
03-26-2013, 10:24 AM
How about a uke with a fan-fret neck? (Multi-scale)

I heard of fan frets..but can you tell me how or what it does for my playing..seen pictures gets me more confused

DewGuitars
03-26-2013, 10:42 AM
I heard of fan frets..but can you tell me how or what it does for my playing..seen pictures gets me more confused

I'm not sure it's very relevant to a uke, given the already-short scales, but it can allow you to go for a shorter scale length on the A than on the G, which can help support the sound (perhaps) if you use a Low G. For example, you can use a 17" scale for the A, and an 18" scale for the G. The E and C would fall in between there.

Dan Uke
03-26-2013, 11:16 AM
Ah geez Daniel, why you gotta go there? :(


I was just kidding!! hehehe I'm gonna have to share your secret recipe :rolleyes:


51001

AncientMatingCalls
03-26-2013, 12:20 PM
How about a uke with a fan-fret neck? (Multi-scale)
I don't think a ukes scale range is wide enough to warrant fanned frets.

MGM
03-26-2013, 01:55 PM
I don't think a ukes scale range is wide enough to warrant fanned frets.
There are fan fret ukes made...I most recently recall one Duane from Blackbeard made.....I played another fan fret but don't find it comfortable or easy to get used to after playing standard stuff for so many years....

Pundabaya
03-26-2013, 02:54 PM
Fan fret necks give me a headache just looking at them. Diatonic necks also look wrong (like on dulcimer-style based instruments) but not like they were designed in the cold depths of R'yleh, with Hounds of Tindalos ready to pounce from their malevolent geometry like fan frets.

BlackBearUkes
03-26-2013, 02:59 PM
I have made 2 ukes with the fan fret system. The incorporated both the concert and soprano scales. They played fine and they really gave a boost to the bottom end. I had trouble selling them because they freaked people out, hence no more fan fret ukes.

kissing
03-26-2013, 03:03 PM
Aren't you just looking for a tenor guitar? Four strings and the scale is in between a bari uke and a "typical" guitar. The body may not be as large as a classical guitar body, but I think it's a very good alternative (and you can find them for a reasonable price).

Nope.
I have two tenor guitars.
They are steel string instruments.
I've tuned one to GCEA one octave below regular ukulele (so it sounds quite bassy), and one is tuned DGBE like a baritone ukulele.
However, I really want something that feels like a classical guitar/uke with nylon strings.

A steel string guitar is a very different animal to a nylon string guitar.

pakhan
03-26-2013, 05:27 PM
Something which most folks may not realise about fanned frets, is that for guitars, they represent the ability to play in alternative tunings where the low E is tuned down- without getting floppy...

Tigeralum2001
03-26-2013, 05:37 PM
I think one of the cooler options is the cantilevered neck. I like the theory, but I have no clue if it "works" like it is supposed to. I imagine a Kasha uke with a cantilevered neck might cause some of our favorite luthiers to have a stroke! ;)

TheCraftedCow
03-26-2013, 08:53 PM
A larger body on a concert scale has been around for quite a long time in South America. It is called cavaco or cavaquinho. Giannini makes some beauties.

DewGuitars
03-27-2013, 01:04 AM
I think one of the cooler options is the cantilevered neck. I like the theory, but I have no clue if it "works" like it is supposed to. I imagine a Kasha uke with a cantilevered neck might cause some of our favorite luthiers to have a stroke! ;)

Yep. That is definitely stroke-worthy. I've never been able to like the tone of instruments that have cantilevered necks. They are just "different".

ThomD
03-29-2013, 08:49 AM
I would like to try a more Kasha Kasha. I have been perusing the various Kasha uke plans, and most of them seem very non-kasha. No TT bars, TT bars in the exact wrong place. Carved away tone bars, no flex in the bridge/bar areas. Or the other extreme, no overlap of the bars to the bridge. Not sure it matters all that much since there has been a lot of scepticism about the detail anyway. I've been building the classical guitars since about '97, so I just gravitate in that direction, now that I want a uke. Just wonder what others have tried.

hawaii 50
03-29-2013, 08:57 AM
I would like to try a more Kasha Kasha. I have been perusing the various Kasha uke plans, and most of them seem very non-kasha. No TT bars, TT bars in the exact wrong place. Carved away tone bars, no flex in the bridge/bar areas. Or the other extreme, no overlap of the bars to the bridge. Not sure it matters all that much since there has been a lot of scepticism about the detail anyway. I've been building the classical guitars since about '97, so I just gravitate in that direction, now that I want a uke. Just wonder what others have tried.



Have you tried
www.hanalima.com

go to their shop store under plans

ThomD
03-30-2013, 02:24 PM
Thanks! Yeah, I like that one. There are more plans for Kasha Ukes, than for guitars it sometimes seems, which is pretty interesting. It does use a heavy bridge patch. I don't want to comment on the specific ones much cause some of them look bad, and then it might still sound great on the same basis anything does.

I was thinking about my wood the other day, and recalled I had some smaller pieces for small euro guitars. I wonder how that would be in a Uke. Simple design, leaves some space for the soundboard to get into it, and sounds punchy, while having a different tone that the classic instrument, which might interest some.

As some have asked for a more classical body shape, and a canti fingerboard, well, there is your chance!

BlackBearUkes
03-30-2013, 02:48 PM
A lot of luthiers have chased their tails in the past working on the Kasha theory. Most have long since abandoned that design because the math doesn't delivery the goods. Ukes ain't guitars so maybe a Kasha based design won't get in the way as much with the smaller soundboard. My own experience has been the extra work yielded no better and often times worse results. To each his own.