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Stackabones
04-11-2013, 05:02 AM
I was curious if any of the players here have ever tried gigging with a uke totally with your voice and uke, sans any mics or amps or PAs, and what techniques you used? How did you play the clubs and venues and house concerts and jams and be properly heard ....Obviously it can be done. I've always been interested in primitive performing, and maybe some other ukers would find this fun, and others would find this a totally ambitious project to try to tackle.



wink (http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?79360-building-without-electricity)

Cooper Black
04-11-2013, 05:36 AM
I mostly play "unplugged", whether it be a jam party or a house concert or just porch picking. Years ago, I had a trio which performed sans amplification at coffeehouse. Of course, most of this experience was with guitar and voice (only been playing uke a year now), but I'll share what I know.

Sing clearly and keep your chin up, projecting out to the back of the room.

Rhythm is everything. A strong beat propels your vocal and gives it a foundation, and the vocal is what people will be listening to.

Relax, and be conservative with your playing. Solos and other areas of refined technique are lost in these situations. House concerts are a major exception in this regard.

Familiar songs are easier to "hear". Play songs people like, songs you sing well, and with few or no "deep album tracks".

Uke specific: I bring a Kanile'a to a regular picking party with fifteen or more players including congas, trumpet, accordian, upright piano, dobro, banjo, fiddle, numerous guitars, singing, background noise, etc. It is most certainly a loud instrument but it wants a plectrum to cut through with clarity, so I use one there.

Playing acoustic is a special sound which I really enjoy. Have fun! I'm sure you will make many folks happy through your performances.

Stackabones
04-11-2013, 05:53 AM
I mostly play "unplugged", whether it be a jam party or a house concert or just porch picking. Years ago, I had a trio which performed sans amplification at coffeehouse. Of course, most of this experience was with guitar and voice (only been playing uke a year now), but I'll share what I know.

Sing clearly and keep your chin up, projecting out to the back of the room.

Rhythm is everything. A strong beat propels your vocal and gives it a foundation, and the vocal is what people will be listening to.

Relax, and be conservative with your playing. Solos and other areas of refined technique are lost in these situations. House concerts are a major exception in this regard.

Familiar songs are easier to "hear". Play songs people like, songs you sing well, and with few or no "deep album tracks".

Uke specific: I bring a Kanile'a to a regular picking party with fifteen or more players including congas, trumpet, accordian, upright piano, dobro, banjo, fiddle, numerous guitars, singing, background noise, etc. It is most certainly a loud instrument but it wants a plectrum to cut through with clarity, so I use one there.

Playing acoustic is a special sound which I really enjoy. Have fun! I'm sure you will make many folks happy through your performances.

This is my experience to a T! I've done a couple hundred or so gigs like this.

For some jam sessions, I often take my 8-string uke.

drbekken
04-11-2013, 12:15 PM
Totally acoustic is the best!!
The 'gig recipe' above is a winner.
NOTHING beats good acoustic sound in a good room.

Tootler
04-11-2013, 02:51 PM
I mostly play and sing in folk clubs and the norm is acoustic. Once a well respected UK folk musician insisted on PA in one folk club I go to. The room is quite small and it's not really needed and he did himself no favours at all.

The folk band I belong to normally perform acoustically. The only exception is when we play for dancing and we need some sound reinforcement to ensure we can be heard properly at the back of largish halls.