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View Full Version : Best pick-up



Tigeralum2001
04-20-2013, 06:49 AM
Ok, ok... is this impossible to answer? Maybe. So let's break it down. Say you have a GREAT (not good) uke into which you want a pick-up installed. You don't play too much in public and will never be a professional. However, when you do play in public (or make a video), you want the best representation of the acoustic sound. Can you give two recommendations:
1. Money is no object. Best ukulele pick-up made.

2. A reasonable, consumer-grade option under $200?

Mahalo!

Dan Uke
04-20-2013, 07:00 AM
Ok, ok... is this impossible to answer? Maybe. So let's break it down. Say you have a GREAT (not good) uke into which you want a pick-up installed. You don't play too much in public and will never be a professional. However, when you do play in public (or make a video), you want the best representation of the acoustic sound. Can you give two recommendations:
1. Money is no object. Best ukulele pick-up made.

2. A reasonable, consumer-grade option under $200?

Mahalo!

If money no object I would choose a pickup that had a dual system w/ mic plus piezo.

Under $200, I liked the LR Baggs 5.0 sound but did like the little control system of the Fishman Prefix. However, they have to cut a big hole on the side...ooopss that will bring it over $200 so that leaves the LR Baggs.

dkcrown
04-20-2013, 07:05 AM
Hey CJ. Whach ya putting it in? :)

PereBourik
04-20-2013, 07:11 AM
Ok, ok... is this impossible to answer? Maybe. So let's break it down. Say you have a GREAT (not good) uke into which you want a pick-up installed. You don't play too much in public and will never be a professional. However, when you do play in public (or make a video), you want the best representation of the acoustic sound. Can you give two recommendations:
1. Money is no object. Best ukulele pick-up made.

2. A reasonable, consumer-grade option under $200?

Mahalo!

You could try a Kremona UK-1 & Behringer AD121. The Kremona attaches under the strings at the tie bridge, so no modification of the uke is needed. The AD121 lets you shape the signal to make it sound like the instrument before it hits the amp. The Kremona goes for about $70. The Behringer is about $40 on Amazon.

Kremona UK-1: http://kremonausa.com/en/news/view/14/21?PHPSESSID=1aa3ffcbb3c56fb102a0da22a0d45f17

Even has a video showing installation.

See post #10 on this thread: http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?70802-Kremona-Uke-pickup

Tigeralum2001
04-20-2013, 07:14 AM
Hey CJ. Whach ya putting it in? :)

I have a couple of options... :)

BIGDB
04-20-2013, 07:35 AM
If go with the fishman matrix infinity. The misi gets so much good reviews because it battery free but I sounds really bad, every time I play the g string with my thumb it kinda makes a thump sound.

ukeeku
04-20-2013, 08:39 AM
The best I have heard is the L.R. Baggs 5-O
here is colmes doing a review of it
http://ukeeku.com/2012/04/02/l-r-baggs-five-o-ukulele-pickup-full-review/

Newportlocal
04-20-2013, 10:56 AM
On my Compass Rose i am getting a D-TAR timber-line. Any other brand I would get a five-o.
I am always open to new and better options, but currently those would be my choices.

UkerDanno
04-20-2013, 01:31 PM
Well, she was a tall blonde cowgirl packing the most gorgeous pair of Wranglers I've ever seen...oh wait, you're talking about another kind of pickup?!:D

Stackabones
04-21-2013, 04:01 AM
I wouldn't install anything or cut up the GREAT uke. I'd use a mic, which is hands down the best representation of your acoustic sound. It's what you'd use in a professional studio, unless something was really wrong with your engineer's ears. Even a standard mic like the Shure SM58 is going sound tons better than any onboard system.

All the other piezo/UST/etc systems will work, but they sound same even if installed on a cinder block.

gyosh
04-21-2013, 05:29 AM
I wouldn't install anything or cut up the GREAT uke. I'd use a mic, which is hands down the best representation of your acoustic sound. It's what you'd use in a professional studio, unless something was really wrong with your engineer's ears. Even a standard mic like the Shure SM58 is going sound tons better than any onboard system.

All the other piezo/UST/etc systems will work, but they sound same even if installed on a cinder block.

Hey CJ,
I agree with Chris. For your intended use a good quality microphone is probably best.

The D-TAR NewportRich mentioned is a collaboration between Seymore Duncan and Rick Turner (Duncan-Turner Acoustic Research). The Timberline model can be configured to use both Piezo and internal microphone.

leokiekie
04-21-2013, 06:01 AM
Different people need different pickups for different reasons. A mic'd uke will always have the most accurate sound but it's just not that practical onstage. I play at different places like bars, restaurants, outdoors weddings, etc, and a microphone is not the most practical thing to use to amplify my ukulele. Crowd noise and wind noise is picked up easily by a mic and I need to move around onstage sometimes to make room for the occasional hula dancer. The best pickup I have ever used is the Baggs 5.0. Very natural and balanced. The D-TAR Timberline is a close second but has more output. When I record at home I use a Rhode microphone.

jackwhale
04-21-2013, 11:28 AM
I like misi pickups. Never had an issue and, to my ears they sound similar to the acoustic sound of the uke. It's very lightweight because there is no battery.

I agree that playing into a quality condenser mike seems the best for reproducing a truly 'live' sound.

Stackabones
04-22-2013, 04:25 AM
Different people need different pickups for different reasons. A mic'd uke will always have the most accurate sound but it's just not that practical onstage. I play at different places like bars, restaurants, outdoors weddings, etc, and a microphone is not the most practical thing to use to amplify my ukulele. Crowd noise and wind noise is picked up easily by a mic and I need to move around onstage sometimes to make room for the occasional hula dancer. The best pickup I have ever used is the Baggs 5.0. Very natural and balanced. The D-TAR Timberline is a close second but has more output. When I record at home I use a Rhode microphone.

In general, I understand where you're coming from and agree with you. Specifically, I've never understood the oft-quoted problems with using mics (movement, crowds, wind, etc). What do singers do? They use mics and have to deal with the same problems, right? You see what I'm getting at?