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Hitman
04-20-2013, 07:45 PM
I need help with naming a chord. I have looked everywhere and I can't seem to find this chord anywhere.

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I hope that makes sense. The top one o's the "A" string. The bottom is the "G" string. The numbers represent the frets.

Thanks to anyone who can help.

Dan Uke
04-20-2013, 08:40 PM
GCGB...Hmmm...I would think a C Major 7 without the E note. Don't know

Tootler
04-20-2013, 08:50 PM
Gsus4 without the D?

Depends on context. sus chords are often used to add colour and usually resolved fairly quickly.

~dave~~wave~
04-21-2013, 12:38 AM
Guitar Pro 6 finds two choices, Gadd11 or Gsus4 as Tootler suggests.

0032
You are doubling G, the tonic, and omitting D, the 5th.
As I understand it, the chord name depends on how you look a the B and C notes.

If B is the third and C the 11th, GP6 names it Gadd11(no5)/C.

If C is a suspended 4th that will resolve, B becomes the flatted eleventh, the chord Gsus4addb11(no5)/C.

/C indicates C is the lowest note, (no5) means the fifth isn't heard.

anthonyg
04-21-2013, 01:33 AM
I need help with naming a chord. I have looked everywhere and I can't seem to find this chord anywhere.

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I hope that makes sense. The top one o's the "A" string. The bottom is the "G" string. The numbers represent the frets.

Thanks to anyone who can help.

Here's a tip. You don't need to know what its called. It sounds good so use it. I use this chord myself in progressions along with a whole BUNCH of chords that don't have simple names. If you want to notate it then use tabs. Seriously, if you put a name on it then someone who plays a guitar or keyboard tries to play the chord as you have named it then it will sound completely different. On a ukulele you have chords with a MAXIMUM of 4 notes and most of the time you are playing triads. This allows for a certain ambiguity to numerous chords. Rather than being worried about it just enjoy and exploit the ambiguity.

Anthony

J-Peg
04-21-2013, 01:44 AM
As anthonyg says, if it sounds good it doesn't really matter what you call it. But if you really must know, then context matters. If it's followed by a G chord then it's probably a Gsus4whatever because it resolves to a G. Try replacing it with something close like a G or a C and see what sounds about right. Then you'll know what it's a variation of.

BigSkyUkuleleGirl
04-21-2013, 03:40 AM
I found this website that is nice - I can plug in the notes and it tells the chord.

http://ukulelehelper.com/

pulelehua
04-21-2013, 11:51 AM
I'd call it a Cmaj7 without the 3rd, which isn't a great way to voice a Major 7 chord. But it will make it sound more ambiguous than if it was a

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vanilla Cmaj7. So, if ambiguous is good, stick with it.

I think it actually is important to know what it is, because it tells you what you're doing at that point in the chord progression. If you follow it with a C chord, it won't sound like much is happening. Likewise, if you follow it with a G, it will sound like not too much is happening, as it's already got G twice, and a B. But if you move to F, or D, it's going to sound like a big move.

Understanding how chords connect is important. Yes, use your ear. But using your brain can save your fingers needless exercise.

Hitman
04-21-2013, 01:41 PM
This chord is in a song I have written. This chord alternates back and forth between a Em, if that is any help.
I am playing the song with a bass player, and I am looking for the root for him to play.
Otherwise, as others have said, I don't really care what it is called, I like the sound of it in this context. But to be able to play it with other musicians eventually, I would like to write a chord chart so that the guitar and keys can follow it too.

Thanks for the help!

Dan Uke
04-21-2013, 01:57 PM
I'd call it a Cmaj7 without the 3rd, which isn't a great way to voice a Major 7 chord. But it will make it sound more ambiguous than if it was a

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vanilla Cmaj7. So, if ambiguous is good, stick with it.

I think it actually is important to know what it is, because it tells you what you're doing at that point in the chord progression. If you follow it with a C chord, it won't sound like much is happening. Likewise, if you follow it with a G, it will sound like not too much is happening, as it's already got G twice, and a B. But if you move to F, or D, it's going to sound like a big move.

Understanding how chords connect is important. Yes, use your ear. But using your brain can save your fingers needless exercise.

I like your answer the best since that's what I said!! LOL

UkerDanno
04-21-2013, 04:25 PM
I'd call it a 2/3G, but since you made it up, you can call it whatever you want! :D

~dave~~wave~
04-21-2013, 04:41 PM
I am playing the song with a bass player, and I am looking for the root for him to play...
...would like to write a chord chart so that the guitar and keys can follow it too.


If you wrote the song, you decide if you want the root to be G or C.
The slash note after the chord name indicates the root note, i.e. [mygoofychord] /G

Hitman
04-24-2013, 02:21 PM
We decided it is a Csus. It could of been a G, but i liked the tension with the Csus.
Thanks for everyone's input.