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Tsani
04-24-2013, 11:49 AM
OK, I play my uke (Epiphone "Less" Paul :rolleyes:) in church on Sunday mornings as part of our semi-contemporary praise and worship band. Is anybody else out there doing this? If so, we should put our heads together on the challenges and joys of playing "church music" on the ukulele. Maybe I'm the only one (on the mainland) that is doing this - but I doubt it.

I would like to know how big this demographic is?

bonesigh
04-24-2013, 11:59 AM
I know that a friend of my 10 year old that I taught to play, plays at her church sometimes but is not a regular in the band "YET".

Dan Uke
04-24-2013, 12:00 PM
John...Oldphart plays...Hopefully he chimes in.

bnolsen
04-24-2013, 12:03 PM
A sort of related question: how large of a hall can you have and get away with not using amplification? I think we have room for 100-150 or so (not very large).

OldePhart
04-24-2013, 12:10 PM
John...Oldphart plays...Hopefully he chimes in.

Most of the time I'm on bass. I've only had the opportunity to play uke in church a handful of times - about half in my church and half with a friend's church in MO when I'm visiting up there.

I did lead the worship service in our church on my Pono baritone a few weeks ago when our worship pastor was out of town. The adults were puzzled but all the kids knew what it was. That time was kind of flying solo because half the band was out sick so I did an acoustic set. I also lead once on my mango tenor with the full band but I had two guys on electric guitars backing me up, and I've done a special or two during the holidays on my tenor.

Returning from UWC in 2011 I spent a week with my friend in MO and he asked me to sit in with their worship band. I took the mango tenor with the MiSi and my little Danelectro "Nifty Fifty" amp that I've converted to run on gel-cells. I got a lot of snickers at first, but after the service their pastor (who also led worship, it's a small church) asked if I was going to be around a while 'cause he wanted me in the band permanently. It's not that I'm that good, it's just that they were a very "mid heavy" band with drums, bass, two acoustic guitars and my buddy's electric guitar. They didn't have a keyboard player at the time. When you don't have a keyboard player the uke can really get up there and shine and sparkle in the higher register. :)

Edit: Oh, and to the original poster's point. Finding the right spot for the ukulele in any band can be a challenge regardless of the type of music. If you just double the guitars they will bury you. If you've got a rhythm-heavy band, playing rhythm on the uke will be buried. The best thing to do is talk to the band leader, explain what the uke can do (or what you can do on it) and then ask what role he or she would like you to fill. As I mentioned above, if you don't have a keyboard or any horns, the uke can really shine in those upper registers that are often missing in a "guitar band." The humble, "what would you like me to do" approach opens a lot of doors.

John

Tootler
04-24-2013, 12:15 PM
A sort of related question: how large of a hall can you have and get away with not using amplification? I think we have room for 100-150 or so (not very large).

It depends on the acoustics. I've played in rooms of that capacity where we've definitely needed PA. In a village hall we've played in a few times, if we play from the floor of the room we can manage fine purely acoustic but if we play on the stage (which we need to do for dancing) we definitely need PA.

OldePhart
04-24-2013, 12:16 PM
A sort of related question: how large of a hall can you have and get away with not using amplification? I think we have room for 100-150 or so (not very large).

You will need some form of amplification at that size unless you are playing solo to a very quiet, respectful audience. You don't need a ton of power, but you'll need to be mic'd in the PA or have a small amp.

John

Tsani
04-24-2013, 12:30 PM
I agree that you really need amplification. I am trying to make a decision right now about whether to buy a new amp to take on a missions trip. I have no idea what it is going to be like when I get there. I hope we will have electricity, but I am not sure.

I have also lead worship with the uke, OldePhart. I was surprised that it was well received. It's usually me, one guitarist, one bassist, keyboard, and assorted vocalists. Our guitarist was out and they asked me to play anyway. It was nice that they thought well enough of my playing to have me lead worship.

Anyway, it is interesting and fun. Lots of challenges, but I love it.

UkeKiddinMe
04-24-2013, 12:53 PM
Definitely intend to do this if the opportunity presents itself.

Pondoro
04-24-2013, 03:29 PM
Edit: Oh, and to the original poster's point. Finding the right spot for the ukulele in any band can be a challenge regardless of the type of music. If you just double the guitars they will bury you. If you've got a rhythm-heavy band, playing rhythm on the uke will be buried. The best thing to do is talk to the band leader, explain what the uke can do (or what you can do on it) and then ask what role he or she would like you to fill. As I mentioned above, if you don't have a keyboard or any horns, the uke can really shine in those upper registers that are often missing in a "guitar band." The humble, "what would you like me to do" approach opens a lot of doors.

John

Could you give more info about what you do that isn't doubling the guitar? I have played a few times with guitarists and I'm at a loss what to do.

Pondoro
04-24-2013, 03:30 PM
I play the uke a lot (solo) to the 3 and 4 year olds in our preschool program. They love it and sing along joyously.

One new boy was very quiet, said literally nothing the first two weeks. When I got my tiny sopranino uke out his eyes literally got wide and he said, "I WANT that!"

Older kids (six to ten) like to sing along to a uke as well but I specialize in the little ones.

OldePhart
04-24-2013, 06:28 PM
Could you give more info about what you do that isn't doubling the guitar? I have played a few times with guitarists and I'm at a loss what to do.

Most of the time if you play second position chords on the uke you'll be above most guitar players - at least most acoustic guitar players. That lets you get a real acoustic sound that is up where you normally only have the lead guitarist with his overdriven sustain stuff.

On quieter songs you can arpeggiate (pattern pick) up there for a little atmosphere.

The key though, is not to be obnoxious with any of it. Just think of it as sprinkling a little spice on the top of the frosting. :)

John

haolejohn
04-24-2013, 08:04 PM
OK, I play my uke (Epiphone "Less" Paul :rolleyes:) in church on Sunday mornings as part of our semi-contemporary praise and worship band. Is anybody else out there doing this? If so, we should put our heads together on the challenges and joys of playing "church music" on the ukulele. Maybe I'm the only one (on the mainland) that is doing this - but I doubt it.

I would like to know how big this demographic is?
Tsani I played regularly on the church's praise team. It was a blast.

TheCraftedCow
04-24-2013, 08:38 PM
If the guitar player is down in the range of the first five frets, you may play the same notes, but an octave higher on the ukulele. The order that those notes are played on a guitar may also be in a different order on a ukulele. The simplest way to explain it is that one instrument is doing what is called the melody and the other instrument is doing harmony.

A Roland Microcube can be carried on your side witha guitar strap placed on the buttons on the case. It has different effects, amps and is powered by AA batterieswhich will give 8 hours of continuous use playing. A volume pedal adds a lot to amplification. You can come in or back out and not miss a beat.

Hochapeafarm
04-24-2013, 10:01 PM
Me, too. Just was talking about doing this last Sunday after church, in our fellowship hall. Our church used to have a stringed instrument band play during service, but apparently the band...disbanded. That was before we joined this particular church. Perhaps I could see, one day, about starting a new stringed instrument band, but I definitely need to be a more proficient player first. :-)


Definitely intend to do this if the opportunity presents itself.

Tsani
04-25-2013, 04:22 AM
I agree with what has been said here about the role of the uke in a band with a guitarist. I think of it as almost a "descant". What we do is similar to the role of that high G string on the re-entrant tuning. We add something in the upper register that complements the sound. My playing is not that good and I am mostly strumming when I am playing with the praise band. I will be doing some picking in an upcoming piece of special music, but I do not try to do anything like playing "lead". What we do is almost always accompanying congregational singing so there is not a lot of opportunity for doing anything that requires a lot of virtuosity.

I am preparing for a piece of special music that will be instrumental - an ukulele duet. We will be playing two pieces by J.S. Bach, but I think of that kind of playing as being in a completely different category from what I do with the praise band.

Tsani
04-25-2013, 04:24 AM
Tsani I played regularly on the church's praise team. It was a blast.

I figured you probably did. I hope you get a chance to bring some "aloha" to a congregation up there in the frozen North. We miss you in the lower 48, amigo.

Tonya
04-25-2013, 07:29 AM
I've seen a couple of "playing ukulele in church" websites come and go over the past few years. This one appears active now, might be of interest to some: http://ukuleleworship.org/home.cfm.

Also some notes here: http://henrywill4.blogspot.com/2011/06/ukulele-praise-and-worship-sites.html

Our ukulele group has played occasionally in church during worship (it was just us, not the regular church music group and it was for a missionary themed Sunday, highlighting Pacific Island areas) but usually our ukes are considered a "special" event type of performance thing at various local churches.

tangimango
04-26-2013, 06:25 PM
one reason why i play ukulele. now we have kids playing and learning at our church. we do solos or show and tell time to time and solos during chrismas.

pulelehua
04-26-2013, 09:55 PM
I've played ukulele in church, but only as a soloist. I had two mics, one for vocals, one for the ukulele. Definitely needed it. Our worship teams are sort of "the right size" so I haven't pushed to join them. But I might join in group stuff at some point. I've been thinking, as you have, what my role would be. I've had a few thoughts:

1. The ukulele is a string/percussion instrument. Or as James Hill says, "It is a strumming machine". You can add lots of rhythmic things. I often do rasgeados, muted strums, that sort of thing. You can add a lot of nice, light rhythms to a texture which sit nicely with kit percussion. This doesn't suit all worship songs, but should suit most anything upbeat.
2. Tremolo melodies work really nicely. It's tricky at first for most people, but if you practice it regularly, you can get a nice, consistent sound. Some people use a plectrum. I've learned to do it with my index and/or middle finger. 10,000 Reasons, by Matt Redman, has a tremolo mandolin part at 2:44 which should give you an idea of the possibilities in the context of worship music.
3. Higher chords voicings, as everyone has been saying. It's good for your ukulele playing to learn chords up the neck. And many can have an open sort of sound, such as C, voiced 0-0-3-7, or even 0-0-8-10.

A ukulele is a big voice in a small package. You just need to know how to coax it out, and punch it through everything else. :) But, I heartily agree with everyone that you're going to need amplification in any but the smallest settings.

Keep us posted as to how you get on! :)

UkeKiddinMe
04-26-2013, 11:38 PM
Soloing v.s strumming:

I was at a service on Thursday. There was a contemporary music group that, at the start, sounded very nice:
2 guitars, electric bass, piano, several singers. However, as the service progressed, one of the guitarists graduated more
and more from strumming to soloing throughout the whole song. Now, I'm not saying there's Not a place for soloing, but I think it should be used
sparingly, at the right time.

For the last third of the service, this player was doing nothing but soloing, and it was distracting.

Comments on approaching this properly?

PTOEguy
04-27-2013, 03:33 AM
I play for the kids division at our church with a piano player who for lack of a better term likes a kind of early 1900s piano sound (not quite ragtime, but close) - uke works great wi this, my main problem is keeping up on volume, which precludes doing anything but strumming. Ive occasionally used a banjolele to try and keep up volume wise, and that works great with his sound.

Also thinking about trying to start a larger ukulele group. We have a few people who've played over the years and may have interest - but I think I'd need music for that. Anybody know a good source?

UkeKiddinMe
04-27-2013, 03:44 AM
If the piano is overwhelming everything else, time to - plug in. ;)

PTOEguy
04-27-2013, 04:31 AM
If the piano is overwhelming everything else, time to - plug in. ;)

Yup - cant decide if I want to add a pickup to my Pono MT or get an Islander KSTCUT with pickup - leaning towards the latter because I'm interested in something spruce-topped, and because my UAS is acting up :D

OldePhart
04-27-2013, 04:46 AM
Soloing v.s strumming:

For the last third of the service, this player was doing nothing but soloing, and it was distracting.

Comments on approaching this properly?

A lot of guitarists - scratch that - a lot of people - don't know how to solo appropriately to the mood of a song. I worked with one guy who I initially thought of as a pretty decent lead guitarist - but, it quickly became obvious that he really only knew one "solo" and he used it (albeit in different keys) for every song where he did a solo. "Solo" is a very appropriate description for this kind of artist because they are off in their own little world doing their thing and are not really in touch with the music.

I know guitarists who are the opposite - they "solo" almost exclusively but they are so in touch with the music, and have such a wide variety of solo techniques, that it is anything but distracting. I guess "solo" is really not the appropriate term for what they do - even though they are playing melodic and harmonic "lines" weaving through the song, rather than anything approaching rhythm, they do it so well that it really enhances the music.

John

Dan Uke
04-27-2013, 05:41 AM
I go to a "young" church where the avg. is around 30 years old and I've seen them play ukulele once so they would be receptive. As for solo guitaring, we sing contemporary Christian music and they will add the solo if the original song had it. I am impressed with how good they are and adds to the service.

Gwynedd
04-27-2013, 07:35 AM
Guitar, esp electric is banned in our church. The funny thing, if you listen to the pre-recorded, purchased accompaniments to the choral songs, there is often electric guitar in the mix. I threatened to bring in the eleuke and wail along with the particular piece that had the electric guitar in the recording and was given a sour look by the director. It would have been cool, though.

UkeKiddinMe
04-27-2013, 07:41 AM
Guitar, esp electric is banned in our church.

Why? Are they talking about guitar with distortion, or any amplified guitar? What about an acoustic with a pickup?
:)

I wish my church had contemporary music. For my particular Christian denomination, there are many, many churches in the
area, and only one of them has a contemporary group. Makes me sad.

Tsani
04-29-2013, 08:03 AM
Based on the interest in this subject, I have started a group in Communities called "Aloha Alleluia". If you are interested or involved in playing music for worship on the ukulele, please join. We can use this forum to swap chords for praise songs and trade thoughts on how to be more effective in serving God through music.

UkeKiddinMe
04-29-2013, 01:15 PM
I can't find Communities.

bnolsen
04-29-2013, 01:54 PM
During service we're only going to ever do traditional hymns that involve the whole church. I'm fine with that and that's not going to change. I'm not exactly sure how to possibly fit in other type music that's appropriate. Perhaps some background type music before church while everyone is gathering (and socializing) might be interesting. The fun of finding a good balance.

haolejohn
04-29-2013, 02:31 PM
I honestly don't know why there are still issues with worship in the church. Whether a church wants to do hymns (which at one time were considered contemporary) or modern worship shouldn't be an issue. Personally I won't attend a hymn only church. Though I find hymns meaningful, they just aren't my type of music.

Sundown Jim
04-29-2013, 04:47 PM
I've played uke in church often, usually with my wife on autoharp to accompany our singing. We run on board pickups through the sound system. In most rooms I believe if you get over about 30-40 people you likely will need amplification. The battery powered Roland Street Cubes are great. We've used them in nursing homes and such and outdoors.

Nickie
04-29-2013, 05:17 PM
Wow, how timely...just got an email from my minister...we have a very music oriented church...she is going to plan a service on the Healing in Music...and she has invited me to participate! woo hoo!

Tele295
04-30-2013, 10:19 AM
I'm looking for a ukulele based Mass setting for an outdoor service ("Mass on the Grass"). Not sure I can talk the choir director into it, but I just have an image in my head of a multi-piece uke section and some steel guitar over the top, with a 50-voice choir.

Hey, it works for the Mariachi Mass!

Dan Uke
04-30-2013, 11:04 AM
Wow, how timely...just got an email from my minister...we have a very music oriented church...she is going to plan a service on the Healing in Music...and she has invited me to participate! woo hoo!

That's great! Playing the uke and praising the Lord...sounds like a blessing

SonSprinter
04-30-2013, 10:52 PM
I did a quick search in BibleGateway for “sing new song,” and here is what I got:

1. Psalm 33:3
Sing to him a new song; play skillfully, and shout for joy.

2. Psalm 96:1
Sing to the Lord a new song; sing to the Lord, all the earth.

3. Psalm 98:1
Sing to the Lord a new song, for he has done marvelous things; his right hand and his holy arm have worked salvation for him.

4. Psalm 144:9
I will sing a new song to you, my God; on the ten-stringed lyre I will make music to you,

5. Psalm 149:1
Praise the Lord. Sing to the Lord a new song, his praise in the assembly of his faithful people.

6. Isaiah 42:10
Sing to the Lord a new song, his praise from the ends of the earth, you who go down to the sea, and all that is in it, you islands, and all who live in them.

I think it is okay, and even good to allow -- and pursue -- new worship songs and music move/minister to you.

I think one of the characteristics of being made in God’s image is that we have the capacity to “create” (in the lower-case “c” [i.e., art, music, etc.]; as opposed to the upper-case “C” [God created Adam and Eve]).

But I don’t think that this is a case against “traditional” hymns. I do find that many hymns tend to have a degree of imagery and sophistication in their lyrics.

I think what ever works -- moves you closer to God -- for the individual is the way to go. Hence having churches/worship services that have different styles is a good thing, IMO.

ricdoug
05-01-2013, 04:44 PM
I agree that you really need amplification. I am trying to make a decision right now about whether to buy a new amp to take on a missions trip. I have no idea what it is going to be like when I get there. I hope we will have electricity, but I am not sure.

Where are you going for your mission, Tsani? Ric

PereBourik
05-02-2013, 10:25 AM
A colleague sent me this...

http://www.larknews.com/archives/3889

OldePhart
05-02-2013, 12:35 PM
A colleague sent me this...

http://www.larknews.com/archives/3889

OH...my...that's pretty funny...unless you're a member of that church, anyway.

And some folks think church bylaws don't matter... LOL

John

cantsing
05-02-2013, 04:32 PM
OH...my...that's pretty funny...unless you're a member of that church, anyway.

And some folks think church bylaws don't matter... LOL

Not sure you caught it, John, but according to Wikipedia, Lark News is satire.

haolejohn
05-02-2013, 05:12 PM
I did a quick search in BibleGateway for “sing new song,” and here is what I got:

1. Psalm 33:3
Sing to him a new song; play skillfully, and shout for joy.

2. Psalm 96:1
Sing to the Lord a new song; sing to the Lord, all the earth.

3. Psalm 98:1
Sing to the Lord a new song, for he has done marvelous things; his right hand and his holy arm have worked salvation for him.

4. Psalm 144:9
I will sing a new song to you, my God; on the ten-stringed lyre I will make music to you,

5. Psalm 149:1
Praise the Lord. Sing to the Lord a new song, his praise in the assembly of his faithful people.

6. Isaiah 42:10
Sing to the Lord a new song, his praise from the ends of the earth, you who go down to the sea, and all that is in it, you islands, and all who live in them.

I think it is okay, and even good to allow -- and pursue -- new worship songs and music move/minister to you.

I think one of the characteristics of being made in God’s image is that we have the capacity to “create” (in the lower-case “c” [i.e., art, music, etc.]; as opposed to the upper-case “C” [God created Adam and Eve]).

But I don’t think that this is a case against “traditional” hymns. I do find that many hymns tend to have a degree of imagery and sophistication in their lyrics.

I think what ever works -- moves you closer to God -- for the individual is the way to go. Hence having churches/worship services that have different styles is a good thing, IMO.

I agree with you. It does pain me though to see churches that are strictly one way or the other. As a younger person in the church that is at that age of leadership (Mid 30s) I see less and less people my age in church. Why? Usually it is music related.

rabbidoninoz
05-02-2013, 05:18 PM
Not church but close...I'm a rabbi and accompany myself on uke when singing the Friday evening service. No amplification, it's a small sanctuary. Most of the congregation seems to like it.

SonSprinter
05-03-2013, 12:34 AM
I agree with you. It does pain me though to see churches that are strictly one way or the other. As a younger person in the church that is at that age of leadership (Mid 30s) I see less and less people my age in church. Why? Usually it is music related.
Yeah, I have seen like a church have its Saturday evening worship be the most contemporary, the Sunday morning 1st service be the most traditional, and the Sunday morning 2nd service be kind of inbetween.

consitter
05-03-2013, 12:49 AM
The church we attended has a comtemporary orchestra. The music director announced at the end of service one day that anyone who had an instrument was welcome to join. I thought that I would love doing this. So after service, I went and talked to him. When I told him I had a uke and would like to play, he said to me very dead-panned, "We really don't have a place for a ukulele in this orchestra." I just said "Okay, thank you." We didn't attend again.

UkeKiddinMe
05-03-2013, 01:39 AM
The church we attended has a comtemporary orchestra. The music director announced at the end of service one day that anyone who had an instrument was welcome to join. I thought that I would love doing this. So after service, I went and talked to him. When I told him I had a uke and would like to play, he said to me very dead-panned, "We really don't have a place for a ukulele in this orchestra." I just said "Okay, thank you." We didn't attend again.

Terrible. Sorry that happened.

OldePhart
05-03-2013, 02:48 AM
Not sure you caught it, John, but according to Wikipedia, Lark News is satire.

Oh...darn. :) I thought it was a little too bizarre a loophole in the bylaws but having been in leadership positions over the years where I had to attend church business meetings and staff meetings and such I could actually see something like it happening. :)

John

OldePhart
05-03-2013, 02:58 AM
The church we attended has a comtemporary orchestra. The music director announced at the end of service one day that anyone who had an instrument was welcome to join. I thought that I would love doing this. So after service, I went and talked to him. When I told him I had a uke and would like to play, he said to me very dead-panned, "We really don't have a place for a ukulele in this orchestra." I just said "Okay, thank you." We didn't attend again.

Wow...that's just lousy leadership any way you look at it. First, putting out an open call without auditions is suicide unless you've already got a huge ensemble in a large venue where you can safely keep any "duds" well away from microphones. Second, if you put out that call then you follow through and let anybody play but you hide the "duds" and those who play instruments that you have difficulty finding a good role for in your arrangements away from said microphones. The same thing applies to choirs, but it's a bit easier there because in a good-sized church an off-key choir member is not going to be heard as long as they are well away from the microphones in the choir loft. A badly-played trumpet or trombone, on the other hand, can punch through most any ensemble without amplification.

Our worship pastor is an old rocker - he's very talented but he will be the first to tell you that he doesn't know how to work with much beyond your typical rock-pop mix of drum, bass, guitars, and keyboards. He's very good with those, though, and we have music far better than you would expect from such a small church. After he took over though we did lose a very accomplished fiddle player - he didn't intentionally run her off but he just kept "stomping on" her parts with overdriven guitar - even where the original artists had used violins.

John

PereBourik
05-03-2013, 05:53 AM
The church we attended has a comtemporary orchestra. The music director announced at the end of service one day that anyone who had an instrument was welcome to join. I thought that I would love doing this. So after service, I went and talked to him. When I told him I had a uke and would like to play, he said to me very dead-panned, "We really don't have a place for a ukulele in this orchestra." I just said "Okay, thank you." We didn't attend again.

Classic Music Minister mistake; he thought the music ministry was about performance. It is the bane of churches From Roman Catholic to Evangelical, to Pentecostal. Every ministry within a congregation is about fellowship before it is about product. One major reason I am ordained is that someone made a place for me in the music ministry. I found my home within the larger congregation and my church fate was sealed.

(Crikey, I just realized that was 50 years ago!) (Our musician way back then played a tenor ukulele. Got a guitar club going and moved it along with his uke.)

We all want our music to be gracious, prayerful, and uplifting, enabling others to find their way to the encounter with the living God. The moment the music ministry (or any ministry for that matter) loses sight of that goal, substituting performance outcomes for the more ephemeral goal of spiritual inspiration it becomes a form of idolatry.

I am rector (senior pastor) of an Episcopal church. We are blessed to worship in a building that will soon be 150 years old. The layout is so rigid that there is little room to rearrange the furniture to accommodate a praise team. Episcopalians are a pretty conventional lot so I don't hear many complaints about that. Our musicians, both the paid musician and the volunteer choir, strive to do their best for God, the congregation and their music. Yet each of them knows that their role is in service of something larger and beyond their control.

Quality matters, but only as it serves the larger goals of fellowship and encounter.

Other than that, I have no opinion in the matter. (Guess this just got me riled up.)

PereBourik
05-03-2013, 05:54 AM
Not sure you caught it, John, but according to Wikipedia, Lark News is satire.

Mea culpa. I swallowed the bait whole.

Sporin
05-03-2013, 06:14 AM
I attend a small, rural Vermont, Unitarian Universalist church. The building is a simple, white clapboard church, 160 years old and has a strong musical tradition. We rent the church out for folk group concerts occasionally.

Our minister is a very good acoustic guitar player and he plays guitar in the service quite often. He even does a yearly service focusing on a single musician (Pete Seeger, Woody Guthrie, Dar Williams) and he plays guitar (to augment our regularly pianist) and leads us in those songs. This sort of all-together-now, folky, music is so warm and welcoming and really fits with our area, and the people in it.

I've played with a group of other friends from church (guitar players) at a few different services, and it's always warmly greeted.

Being UU gives us a lot of latitude as far a "praise" goes but there is so much spiritually strong music out there that isn't pigeon-holed into a single faith. Frankly, I find the music to be a big thing for me every week.

Tsani
05-03-2013, 07:52 AM
Where are you going for your mission, Tsani? Ric

Belize, near Corozal. My son and I are in charge of the music portion of things. Trying to learn Spanish lyrics. Aieaiaiaieeee!!!! Muchas challenges!:biglaugh:

Tsani
05-03-2013, 08:00 AM
The church we attended has a comtemporary orchestra. The music director announced at the end of service one day that anyone who had an instrument was welcome to join. I thought that I would love doing this. So after service, I went and talked to him. When I told him I had a uke and would like to play, he said to me very dead-panned, "We really don't have a place for a ukulele in this orchestra." I just said "Okay, thank you." We didn't attend again. That is just SO MESSED UP! Very sorry. My philosophy - praise God with what you've got. If it's a guitar, praise Him with that. If it's a kazoo, praise Him with that. If it's an ukulele, play it 'till the strings break. We are to praise the LORD with all our might. Don't hold back and don't get in the way.:music:

UkeKiddinMe
05-03-2013, 09:12 AM
Any church music director denying someone the opportunity to participate is really making a grave mistake.

Sad, and seriously wrong. I'd like an opportunity to talk to that person.

dkpianoman21
05-03-2013, 03:29 PM
I play 2nd acoustic guitar / ukulele about once a month. We rotate everyone, and there's a guy who plays on a nylon string guitar and does a phenomenal job at playing tasteful little licks and runs. The worship leader plays 1st acoustic, which is rhythm, the electric guitar plays using lots of effects, and functions almost like a pad (we don't always have a keyboard player) so the fancy runs and fills are left up to the 2nd acoustic player. I get a lot of complements on the sound of the ukulele, and my size (6'2" 260lb) compared to the uke is often remarked on as well. Overall I think there is a bright future for the ukulele in praise and worship music.

Pondoro
05-03-2013, 04:04 PM
Years ago, when I was more serious about harmonica and didn't play a uke, we got a new young music minister. He asked anyone who played instruments to talk to him (didn't promise anything, just said talk to him). I told him that I played harmonica, said that I understood he didn't want or need a harmonica for every song, but offered to work on a few songs if he wanted a harmonica once in a while.

He had basically heard one song that he knew used a harmonica, and seemed unable to talk about any other song. He just wanted to know if I could play that specific song. I hadn't heard it so i could not tell him, "Yes, I play that song." We parted and he "knew" that I couldn't play the harmonica because I didn't know that exact song. As I expected he never got back to me.

PereBourik
05-03-2013, 05:10 PM
That is just SO MESSED UP! Very sorry. My philosophy - praise God with what you've got. If it's a guitar, praise Him with that. If it's a kazoo, praise Him with that. If it's an ukulele, play it 'till the strings break. We are to praise the LORD with all our might. Don't hold back and don't get in the way.:music:

+1. You find a place for every player.

Gwynedd
05-04-2013, 12:03 AM
Why? Are they talking about guitar with distortion, or any amplified guitar? What about an acoustic with a pickup?
:)

.

I believe he means the classic-rock electric guitar sound as in heavy metal, which is understandably not liked by conservative churches (I was chagrined to see Jake S. use the rock two-finger sign which is a salute to Satan even if you are doing it out of custom rather than conviction, for example.) You need to understand that youth likes to shock the elders as they do the natural separation and formation of their independent life (but at the same time, joining in with youth culture to avoid being cut from the pack and bullied, hence piercings and tattoos are both to annoy the parental units AND to show belonging to the pack, making what was outsider and edgy actually conventional ) but ...I digress.

The director obviously doesn't want rock guitar, so they do contemporary hymns but they are actually 70's and 80's style contempo music, if you are old enough to remember back. So it isn't really anymore conservative than 2000's music, it's just slightly older and has gotten to be elevator music at this point rather than state of the art. So yes amped guitar --acoustic with pickup would be ok--save we have no guitars at all. Trumpets and trombones are ok as they are mentioned prominently in the BIible (hatsotsrot) and if we had them, flutes would be ok, even I assume bagpipes as the psaltery was I think a musette or bagpipe.

Now, guitars are an offshoot of harps as we KNOW harps figure prominently (David soothed insane King Saul with his harp) but...guitars are "bad" because rock and folk people play them.

It's a mess of what is mainstream and accepted in biblical musical departments, and rejected because it's popular and diverting from serious worship. Add to that our church's attitude on dance (confused, in my mind) and it's not logical. This is the problem with DOGMA, it diverges inevitably from the word of the Bible because it's judicial in nature.

Short answer; no electric guitar or any guitar and it's a bit silly as the guitar is clearly on the electronic background they use and what's more, what is more "modern" than using a digital accompaniment on a computer sound board to play with the choir? And yes, we use mics.

T'is a puzzlement. Meanwhile, my late and deeply Christian husband who as a college kid and SAVED, managed a punk band of which name I can't even TYPE (so rude) and famous in Boston, hated the contempo hymns and wanted only the old-timey ones. He preferred singing a cappella with the Mennonites, when it came to music (we're Baptists....)

UkeKiddinMe
05-04-2013, 02:07 AM
... (I was chagrined to see Jake S. use the rock two-finger sign which is a salute to Satan even if you are doing it out of custom rather than conviction, for example.) ...

I used to think that about that sign, but later I saw that the Sign Language sign for I Love You is that. Aren't many people
giving the I Love You sign rather than doing the other?

pulelehua
05-04-2013, 06:02 AM
I used to think that about that sign, but later I saw that the Sign Language sign for I Love You is that. Aren't many people
giving the I Love You sign rather than doing the other?

Depends if you're using your thumb. Thumb out means ILY in American Sign Language, or I Love You.

Thumb in is a variety of things, from the Rock n Roll thing to a Latin American ward against bad luck.

I'm pretty sure Jake is not advocating any sort of Satan worship, and I think God probably knows that, being omniscient and everything.

OldePhart
05-04-2013, 07:30 AM
(I was chagrined to see Jake S. use the rock two-finger sign which is a salute to Satan even if you are doing it out of custom rather than conviction, for example.)

Actually, I'd never heard of that interpretation of the sign before and had to Google it to make sure you weren't having us on! :)

My wife learned sign language years ago so I always knew it as the shorthand sign for "I Love you". Then we moved to Texas. And everybody here knows that stands for "hook 'em horns" (UT Longhorns).

John

PereBourik
05-04-2013, 07:55 AM
Depends if you're using your thumb. Thumb out means ILY in American Sign Language, or I Love You.

Thumb in is a variety of things, from the Rock n Roll thing to a Latin American ward against bad luck.

I'm pretty sure Jake is not advocating any sort of Satan worship, and I think God probably knows that, being omniscient and everything.

Sadly, these days some imagine that what they know is more important than what God knows or cares about. Evangelicals in America are notorious for jumping to the worst possible conclusions.