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View Full Version : Worth getting my uke repaired?



noob_uke
05-02-2013, 03:52 PM
Been practicing and my uke still buzzes on certain strings, really annoying. Was gonna take it to a shop but no sure it worth it since I got it for $50?

PereBourik
05-02-2013, 04:01 PM
Did you buy it locally? Take it back to that shop and ask them to fix it. If you didn't buy it locally take it to a shop as see if they can tell you what might be done. It might be something simple.

mm stan
05-02-2013, 04:04 PM
Depends how much you like the sound, playability and comfort from it....may cost as much as the uke itself...only you can answer that...next time buy from HMS and a set up
you pay more but you get a great sounding uke....I have played their kalas...they sound good.. buy cheap ukes on sale, there is a reason for that....in the end it cost you more and wastes
your time with fustration....good Luck how long ago did you buy this uke...if it is recently bought and in same condition as bought, take it back to return and get your money back and call HMS

noob_uke
05-02-2013, 04:17 PM
No I was on vacation and got it out of town. I will just practice on this one and get a better one later. It was one of those things that I wanted to try and ended up liking to play the uke.

Tiki.time
05-02-2013, 04:26 PM
It may be time to treat yourself to a new and better uke.
I know I'm hoping to do that myself this year. :cool:

Kayak Jim
05-03-2013, 01:58 AM
You could try putting a shim under the saddle. Use veneer or thin plastic (like from the lid of a margarine container).

PhilUSAFRet
05-03-2013, 02:11 AM
If you have any woodworking/craft skills, you may try doing a "setup" yourself. May take less than you think and it will be good practice. A little sanding, a little slot filing, etc. Check this link to see what might be involved.

http://www.theukulelesite.com/ukulele-setup.html

Spud1$
05-03-2013, 04:02 AM
I say either get it fixed or buy a new one. If it sounds good you will enjoy it so much more therefore you will practice it so much more. I did the same thing, bought a brand new soprano at a yard sale really cheap, messed around for a while then paid a local luthier to fix it up. It cost more in the end then buying a new one with a set up. I gave the fixed one to my grandaughter, then I missed playing it ( and I stink, but I still love it) so I got one all set up from HMS. What a difference!! I practice everyday because it sounds like its supposed too! Good luck.

vanflynn
05-03-2013, 04:29 AM
I agree with Phil. This is the perfect opportunity to learn setups if you ever wanted.

John (oldphart) did a detailed one on a dolphin http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXUcm_IAmTs that shows dressing frets

Good luck

noob_uke
05-03-2013, 05:36 AM
Been practicing and my uke still buzzes on certain strings, really annoying. Was gonna take it to a shop but no sure it worth it since I got it for $50?

I been practicing Drop Baby Drop, and really messing with my Uke to find the buzzing. It doesnt happen when I pick the strings. Only when I Barre all the strings, the 2nd fret and 4th of the song.
Sometimes there is buzz sometimes not. It is the E and A strings that buzz when I Barre all the strings with my index finger.
But I will get a better Uke from HMS in the future. Anyone recommendations around $150?

stevepetergal
05-03-2013, 06:16 AM
I say it's worth it. You have a perfectly servicable instrument. Why not have it made right by a professional? Get it set up right the first time and help keep your local guy in business. In addition you not only develope a relationship with a luthier, but you help educate the local guitar people regarding respect for our instruments and us as musicians.
This is important stuff in my opinion.

hoosierhiver
05-03-2013, 06:17 AM
It's a good opportunity for you to learn a little about ukuleles. Try working on it yourself, it'll help you gain insight into why a good uke sounds good.

PereBourik
05-03-2013, 06:18 AM
If you have any woodworking/craft skills, you may try doing a "setup" yourself. May take less than you think and it will be good practice. A little sanding, a little slot filing, etc. Check this link to see what might be involved.

http://www.theukulelesite.com/ukulele-setup.html

Here's a recent thread on UU. I needed to do some setup work on my pineapple ukulele. Asked how to do it. This thread was the result...

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?79203-Ukulele-Set-up

Shastastan
05-03-2013, 07:36 AM
I say either get it fixed or buy a new one. If it sounds good you will enjoy it so much more therefore you will practice it so much more. I did the same thing, bought a brand new soprano at a yard sale really cheap, messed around for a while then paid a local luthier to fix it up. It cost more in the end then buying a new one with a set up. I gave the fixed one to my grandaughter, then I missed playing it ( and I stink, but I still love it) so I got one all set up from HMS. What a difference!! I practice everyday because it sounds like its supposed too! Good luck.

Good lessons to be learned from Spud1's experience. It's just human nature to want to buy for less. I've gotta wonder how many folks tried a poor quality uke, had a bad experience, quit, and never went back. I'm thankful that I already knew that I needed a decent quality instrument to try so that I could know if it was me or the instrument that was causing problems. Every uke that I bought was taken in for a setup for $15. No point in handicapping your self from day 1. FWIW

RedBeth
05-03-2013, 11:07 AM
I started with a buzzy stringed uke for about 2 days, I took it back and upgraded to a Lanikai concert. I'm pretty happy with my decision. ;)