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View Full Version : Thoughts on jake S documentary



BIGDB
05-14-2013, 07:31 AM
There's been a lot of threads reminding people about his documentary so I'm guessing most people here have watched it. I'm wondering what you thought was most interesting about it I thought it was that he said me touring Is taking away time from my realationship. Wonder if he's gonna stop touring or just do it less?

hoosierhiver
05-14-2013, 07:33 AM
He just got married this past year, that's probably part of it.
If he does tour less, I'd like to see his little brother take up some of the slack.

CTurner
05-14-2013, 08:58 AM
I thought the most interesting sequence was when he realized that trying to play faster and faster, louder and louder, was a dead end. When my wife and I saw him live here in Carrboro NC a few months back, the best moments were when he took the time to breathe and found great depth. His technique is marvelous—he can rock and speed with anyone—but it's the subtleties of his playing that I think we can look forward more and more to seeing and appreciating.

Tinstar
05-14-2013, 09:30 AM
His playing...simply amazing! I am new to Ukes and I had never seen nor heard him play before...OMG! I was astounded and I couldn't believe that that much music could ever come from a Ukulele! I am in awe. He truly has a special gift.

localmana
05-14-2013, 09:38 AM
Thanks for your posting. I was left with the question as to whether he would prioritize his role as new father and tour less. Also, I was interested in his comment about staying within the integrity of the uke, which I thought meant that he thought that all the distortion stuff was too far beyond.

greenie44
05-14-2013, 10:17 AM
I don't know - that stuff kind of seemed like the process of selective editing. I mean, this is a guy who also said he forgets to eat, no doubt because of his playing, practice and touring schedule. My guess is he keeps playing a lot, but maybe not as much. And I so loved hearing him play with Bruce a couple of years ago at the Ukulele Festival.

gyosh
05-14-2013, 10:20 AM
I agree with all that has been said and personally I would have like to see it go for about 1/2 an hour more and devote some more to his stint with PureHeart, the complications/downside to being on the road all the time, maybe more of his charitable work. I would have like to see a little part of "how" he arranges some of his songs too.

Watched it about three times already:)

fumanshu
05-14-2013, 10:47 AM
The documentary seems to be quite interesting, is it still available for live streaming somewhere?


https://soundcloud.com/baouke/star-filante-by-caro-bao

BIGDB
05-14-2013, 10:54 AM
The documentary seems to be quite interesting, is it still available for live streaming somewhere?


https://soundcloud.com/baouke/star-filante-by-caro-bao

This is where I watched it http://m.video.unctv.org/video/2365004338/

BigSkyUkuleleGirl
05-14-2013, 01:47 PM
Haven't seen it yet but enjoying reading everyone's thoughts - it airs in my area at the end of the month. I have seen Jake twice now and each time he is fantastic and after the show a very gracious host. I hope to see him again this year so he can play and sign my new Kamaka. Sometimes when I watch an artist live I think, "you know, I could do that"......when I saw Jake - I was like "I could NEVER do that!!!"....lol

I would like to see more of his brother as well, also would like to see him put out a songbook for Grand Ukulele and perhaps record more lessons. I have the DVD with the lesson on "Yesterday" and he is a fabulous teacher. I imagine as the years go by he will tour less, I just wish I lived in HI so I could take lessons......

sukie
05-14-2013, 01:52 PM
Didn't his brother just do part of a tour with him?

The show was wonderful. I love to watch him play. And I wish there was a little more of that. But I liked learning more about the person and what makes him tick. Mrs. S. is a lucky woman.

itsme
05-14-2013, 02:46 PM
I'm wondering what you thought was most interesting about it I thought it was that he said me touring Is taking away time from my realationship. Wonder if he's gonna stop touring or just do it less?
One thing I took away from the show was how much his parents' divorce had apparently deeply affected him. I would hope he takes that to heart regarding his own relationship with his wife and child. He needs to be there for them, and incessant touring will interfere with that. I wouldn't blame him at all for paring down his touring schedule.

fumanshu
05-14-2013, 03:12 PM
One thing I took away from the show was how much his parents' divorce had apparently deeply affected him. I would hope he takes that to heart regarding his own relationship with his wife and child. He needs to be there for them, and incessant touring will interfere with that. I wouldn't blame him at all for paring down his touring schedule.

That's interesting to hear something from a guy like Jake and to see that as much the divorce affected him as much he did what he has to do and has a nice career now....


https://soundcloud.com/baouke/star-filante-by-caro-bao

Pueo
05-14-2013, 03:28 PM
I really enjoyed the documentary. I can imagine that someone who blows up as fast as Jake did would have challenges dealing with it, but it seems that he is handling it well. Awareness that it is taking time away from his family means that he is not so lost in himself or his success, which is a good thing.

I am one of those people who is interested in hearing music come out of the ukulele, and while I admire technical speed and skill, I would rather hear something expressive than just marvel at how many notes he can fit into a measure. I also would have enjoyed learning more about his arrangement process.

Oh, and I really enjoyed seeing Bruce perform at the Ukulele Picnic a few months ago. He is really great!

Marvelle
05-14-2013, 03:30 PM
For me I thought the documentary successfully demonstrated what a nice, genuine guy he seems to be. Someone with those chops could be very self-satisfied, and the impression I got was that he's quite the opposite. Loved watching him play for the older people.

I was also struck by the tsunami footage and the terrible aftermath. A riveting part of the film for me.

Frank

rowjimmytour
05-15-2013, 07:00 PM
His love for the uke really shines in the documentary and love the part about him giving up all the guitar effects and playing pure uke again. Some more favs are going back to his old home where he grew up and playing for the children. Jake in Japan after the tsunami and teaching the school kids twinkle twinkle little star. Many cool parts but final favorite is Jake cruising the streets of Japan w/ uke in hand walking and playing Shirley Temple. Must see in my book.

SonSprinter
05-15-2013, 09:24 PM
Hay, Jake's wife, Kelly, her maiden name is Yamasato, which is the same last name as lead singer, Jon, of Pure Heart (Jake's initial band). I woner if there is any relationship (although Yamasato is a fairly common Japanese name in Hawaii).

stevepetergal
05-16-2013, 01:10 AM
I'd never seen his manager before. It was interesting to me to see a little of their relationship, and the admiration they have for each other.

I too thought it was a half hour too short. It felt like they got everything in and did a great job of presenting his roots, his early career, his life on the road, his aspiration(s), and of course his playing. But it seemed choppy, moving so fast through all that info and footage.

Wicked
05-16-2013, 04:26 AM
I just gave the documentary a quick look… From a musical perspective, the single most important statement was right around the half-way point: “That is when I really started to learn how to utilize space in my music.”

That there is pure gold, and something that the vast majority of ukulele players should take to heart.

Most players that I see appear to fear silence, and that is a problem. This is especially true of the ukulele because the sound decays relatively quickly in comparison to a piano or guitar, for example. This causes people to feel the need to fill the void with manic strumming. It’s not just the random kids on TouTube either – my biggest gripe with Eddie Vedder’s ukulele album was that he just keeps strumming that thing when a bit of silence would be more appropriate.

One could look at silence as the blank canvas on which you “paint” the music… but, in actuality, silence is an important hue on your palette. It can (and should) stand alone, as part of your glorious masterpiece.

AndrewKuker
05-16-2013, 04:32 AM
I'd never his manager before. It was interesting to me to see a little of their relationship, and the admiration they have for each other.

I too thought it was a half hour too short. It felt like they got everything in and did a great job of presenting his roots, his early career, his life on the road, his aspiration(s), and of course his playing. But it seemed choppy, moving so fast through all that info and footage.

I agree Steven!
One thing I thought they brushed by too fast was the influence of his first teacher. Treacy Terada taught all that latin/flamenco & jazz style that he built off. Treacy recorded and produced the Pure Heart albums and his first solo albums.
But Jake has grown well beyond that. A true artist but he needs a producer that doesn't want commercial. I don't know, sometimes it's like Wes Montegomery with A&M, too polished. Just opinion, I love his writing.
The documentary was very well made and is a huge inspiration for the ukulele and it's potential.
Sound through studio monitors was sweet. I was impressed with their outdoor sound in Japan, walking, cars passing, that some killer post editing for sure.

vanflynn
05-16-2013, 05:00 AM
My thoughts are that the documentary is rough for us recreational players. After Jake nailed a song my wife said “That was nice, you should learn that one”. Yah, in my dreams.

I thought it confirmed what has been said here on multiple posts, that Jake is truly a nice humble person. That is something that is tough to fake.

All in all a great piece.

konut
05-16-2013, 05:45 AM
Some great observations thus far! Having only seen a few youtube vids of Jake previously, and never live, what stood out for me was his stage presence and showmanship. He has a magnetism and charisma that manifests itself when he performs in concert. Having been a soundman many years ago working with various bands, I've observed that this is a quality that is either there or not. Together with his virtuosity, this makes for a very powerful combination.

hoosierhiver
05-16-2013, 07:28 AM
A reminder about his show in Indianapolis a few days post UWC.
I have a few tickets to give away for the UWC raffle.
http://jakeshimabukuro.com/event/the-palladium/

SonSprinter
05-17-2013, 12:16 AM
Not to take anything away from Jake, but I always considered Ohta-san (Herb Ohta, Sr.) the first touring solo ukulele virtuoso. I always wondered how much of Japan's fondness for the ukulele was due to Ohta-san.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMNQkJn5iIc&feature=youtube_gdata_player

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cAPpKvmDoeM&feature=youtube_gdata_player

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFPAR2F5N6c&feature=youtube_gdata_player


This father-son duet is neat.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-hETgj9_B0&feature=youtube_gdata_player