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alemarco
07-13-2013, 06:09 PM
Season 74 of the Ukulele -- It's a Fact!

So much music is inspired by the people and events in the news or from history.
Therefore, this week's challenge is to sing songs about real people or events of historical significance. Whether that significance is global, national, local, political or cultural is up to you.

Examples:
Ohio
Vincent
Erie Canal
Casey Jones
Zoot Suit Riot
Skye Boat Song
Children's Crusade
Lindy Comes to Town
John Wayne Gracy, Jr.
Abraham, Martin, and John
Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald

I'm looking for songs that are somewhat specific. The entire song doesn't need to be about the event or person, but I'd prefer songs that aren't just generally anti-war.

Timing:
Posting starts Sunday July 14
Ends Sunday July 21 at midnight (that really means before I wake up Monday)

Awards:
(1) Random Drawing
(2) Longest Rabbit Trail -- Entry that sends me on the longest diversion to learn about the song/person/event.
(3) Grand Prize -- points are given for song choice, performance, enthusiasm, hats, etc.
Super bonus points given if you post a song that has some relationship with this week
(e.g., a song about the fall of the Bastille which happened on July 14).

There will be some prizes, but I haven't figured out what they will be yet. I'll keep you posted.

Bonuses:
I love bonuses. Post as many as you want, but please only bonuses that you made for this season.

Playlists:
Entry List (http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzmhSFmrehAT3H2abd6ci0Sb4jth_LDSs)
Bonus List (http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzmhSFmrehAQMCBwwx04GLlb-ssfUBLEr)

Have fun! I'm looking forward to seeing what you have in store for this week.

Tootler
07-13-2013, 08:33 PM
Excellent challenge. I have a couple of traditional ballads in mind and can also think of a few songs written by British folk singers that will fit.

It will have to wait till after I get back from holiday on Tuesday, though.

peewee
07-13-2013, 09:29 PM
That is a fantastic theme, bravo!

pabrizzer
07-14-2013, 12:47 AM
Jandamarra / Pigeon a Paul Kelly song about an Aboriginal resistance fighter in Western Australia in the late 1800s.
I have visited Windjana Gorge where he was wounded but escaped and Tunnel Creek where he was shot and killed by another Aboriginal tracker.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=050QfNkaAnA

xommen
07-14-2013, 02:27 AM
My entry for this Season: Ballad of Ronnie Drew by U2 and some other Irish Musicians.
Ronnie Drew was an Irish Singer/Musician who inspired other Irish Musicians.

http://youtu.be/UVP_X1mx7Ho

xommen
07-14-2013, 02:28 AM
A bonus: U2 MLK (Martin Luther King).

http://youtu.be/RdvsH2hRu0o

kleblanc
07-14-2013, 03:20 AM
Oh, this is a good one. Quite a few challenges in there. Can't wait to see all the entries!

DWitt
07-14-2013, 04:19 AM
Hm. I mentioned Sufjan Stevens's "John Wayne Gacy, Jr." just a couple weeks ago. I guess I'll take up that particular challenge . . .

There's quite a bit of relevant S. Stevens material. Like much of the entire albums "Greetings from Michigan," "Illinoise," and "The Avalanche." Maybe someone else will do some Stevens as well!

A couple of idle questions:

1. What about songs that are part of historical narratives, although they are not part of actual documented history (and may, in fact, never have actually existed)? I'm thinking of Leonard Cohen's "Story of Isaac," which is about Abraham and Isaac, but I'm sure there are other kinds of similar cases. Songs about Moses and Joseph and so forth. Or, in a different vein: They Might Be Giants have a couple songs about evolutionary history, e.g. "Mammal," or "My Brother the Ape"—again, not documented history, but factual and historical . . .

2. What about songs that are based on historical figures, but are in some ways, eh, fictionalized? They Might Be Giants have a bunch of songs like this, e.g. "Tesla" on their newest album, or "Meet James Ensor." As a related aside, I hope someone does Jonathan Coulton's amazing "Kenesaw Mountain Landis"! I tried learning it, and I can't figure out how to play it so it doesn't sound like crap.

wee_ginga_yin
07-14-2013, 04:22 AM
It's a fact... Ye can't spend a dollar when yer deid.

In 1961 there were mighty protests in Scotland because
the Polaris nuclear submarines were stationed in the Holy Loch.

Some argued that there would be prosperity because of the mighty dollar. Some feared the Yanks would steal all the lassies. Some thought Scotland would become a target because of the presence of the missiles. Those were the days of protest marches and the CND.
But it was not only protests against Polaris it was an on-going battle
against the Trident (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vlbetrpyz8c)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfQLXaKBD1k

myrnaukelele
07-14-2013, 06:40 AM
Love this week's theme alemarco! There are so many directions to go in I can't decide which historical period to sing about. :)

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
07-14-2013, 08:30 AM
Great theme, alemarco---looking forward to learning a lot this week.

alemarco
07-14-2013, 08:34 AM
Hm. I mentioned Sufjan Stevens's "John Wayne Gacy, Jr." just a couple weeks ago. I guess I'll take up that particular challenge . . .

There's quite a bit of relevant S. Stevens material. Like much of the entire albums "Greetings from Michigan," "Illinoise," and "The Avalanche." Maybe someone else will do some Stevens as well!

A couple of idle questions:

1. What about songs that are part of historical narratives, although they are not part of actual documented history (and may, in fact, never have actually existed)? I'm thinking of Leonard Cohen's "Story of Isaac," which is about Abraham and Isaac, but I'm sure there are other kinds of similar cases. Songs about Moses and Joseph and so forth. Or, in a different vein: They Might Be Giants have a couple songs about evolutionary history, e.g. "Mammal," or "My Brother the Ape"—again, not documented history, but factual and historical . . .

2. What about songs that are based on historical figures, but are in some ways, eh, fictionalized? They Might Be Giants have a bunch of songs like this, e.g. "Tesla" on their newest album, or "Meet James Ensor." As a related aside, I hope someone does Jonathan Coulton's amazing "Kenesaw Mountain Landis"! I tried learning it, and I can't figure out how to play it so it doesn't sound like crap.

Sufjan Stevens has several wonderful songs that would perfectly fit for this week. I hope that someone does at least one.

In answer to your questions:
1. If you have a song you really, really, really want to do that falls into this category, go ahead. But I'd really prefer sticking to documented history in some form. If you want to combine the two, there are some songs that compare Martin Luther King and the civil rights movement to Moses and the exodus, which would be perfectly fitting the theme.

2. Absolutely! Many songs about historical people fall into this category since they are usually a musician's perspective on someone else.

alemarco
07-14-2013, 08:40 AM
Great start this morning!

pabrizzer - Jandamarra/Pigeon - Fascinating song and story. I especially like the line about "I do this job because I have to; I don't say that he's to blame." Wonderful performance!

xommen - Ballad of Ronnie Drew - Great song about a great musician! The story of this song is really interesting too; quite a list of prominent Irish musicians contributing to the original version. Wonderful job!

xommen - MLK - This is one of my favorite U2 songs. It's so beautiful and simple. I liked the slight reverb you used on the vocals.

weegingayin - Ding Dong Dollar - Never heard of this incident before. Good protest song with a mix of very serious concerns about nuclear war and US interference and slightly more light-hearted issues of the price of beer and the availability of single girls. Great job!

I've already learned a lot and it's only the first day. Keep it coming!

wallyboy
07-14-2013, 08:59 AM
heres my go, a song that i loved when first came out good old DM,
still going strong,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfTYQ5R75xw

decaturcomp
07-14-2013, 09:15 AM
I think this may fall into the 'too general' category so let's call it a bonus, shall we?

I thought of setting the appropriate poem (written on this date) to music but it is very long so I remembered a favorite alternate. All is explained herein.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MY5OFe3KnNc&feature=c4-overview&list=UUa57R-HT-UlbHxQ0i2hy7yw

Plutonian OdeI

What new element before us unborn in nature? Is there
a new thing under the Sun?
At last inquisitive Whitman a modern epic, detonative,
Scientific theme
First penned unmindful by Doctor Seaborg with poison-
ous hand, named for Death's planet through the
sea beyond Uranus
whose chthonic ore fathers this magma-teared Lord of
Hades, Sire of avenging Furies, billionaire Hell-
King worshipped once
with black sheep throats cut, priests's face averted from
underground mysteries in single temple at Eleusis,
Spring-green Persephone nuptialed to his inevitable
Shade, Demeter mother of asphodel weeping dew,
her daughter stored in salty caverns under white snow,
black hail, grey winter rain or Polar ice, immemor-
able seasons before
Fish flew in Heaven, before a Ram died by the starry
bush, before the Bull stamped sky and earth
or Twins inscribed their memories in clay or Crab'd
flood
washed memory from the skull, or Lion sniffed the
lilac breeze in Eden--
Before the Great Year began turning its twelve signs,
ere constellations wheeled for twenty-four thousand
sunny years
slowly round their axis in Sagittarius, one hundred
sixty-seven thousand times returning to this night

Radioactive Nemesis were you there at the beginning
black dumb tongueless unsmelling blast of Disil-
lusion?
I manifest your Baptismal Word after four billion years
I guess your birthday in Earthling Night, I salute your
dreadful presence last majestic as the Gods,
Sabaot, Jehova, Astapheus, Adonaeus, Elohim, Iao,
Ialdabaoth, Aeon from Aeon born ignorant in an
Abyss of Light,
Sophia's reflections glittering thoughtful galaxies, whirl-
pools of starspume silver-thin as hairs of Einstein!
Father Whitman I celebrate a matter that renders Self
oblivion!
Grand Subject that annihilates inky hands & pages'
prayers, old orators' inspired Immortalities,
I begin your chant, openmouthed exhaling into spacious
sky over silent mills at Hanford, Savannah River,
Rocky Flats, Pantex, Burlington, Albuquerque
I yell thru Washington, South Carolina, Colorado,
Texas, Iowa, New Mexico,
Where nuclear reactors creat a new Thing under the
Sun, where Rockwell war-plants fabricate this death
stuff trigger in nitrogen baths,
Hanger-Silas Mason assembles the terrified weapon
secret by ten thousands, & where Manzano Moun-
tain boasts to store
its dreadful decay through two hundred forty millenia
while our Galaxy spirals around its nebulous core.
I enter your secret places with my mind, I speak with
your presence, I roar your Lion Roar with mortal
mouth.
One microgram inspired to one lung, ten pounds of
heavy metal dust adrift slow motion over grey
Alps
the breadth of the planet, how long before your radiance
speeds blight and death to sentient beings?
Enter my body or not I carol my spirit inside you,
Unnaproachable Weight,
O heavy heavy Element awakened I vocalize your con-
sciousness to six worlds
I chant your absolute Vanity. Yeah monster of Anger
birthed in fear O most
Ignorant matter ever created unnatural to Earth! Delusion
of metal empires!
Destroyer of lying Scientists! Devourer of covetous
Generals, Incinerator of Armies & Melter of Wars!
Judgement of judgements, Divine Wind over vengeful
nations, Molester of Presidents, Death-Scandal of
Capital politics! Ah civilizations stupidly indus-
trious!
Canker-Hex on multitudes learned or illiterate! Manu-
factured Spectre of human reason! O solidified
imago of practicioner in Black Arts
I dare your reality, I challenge your very being! I
publish your cause and effect!
I turn the wheel of Mind on your three hundred tons!
Your name enters mankind's ear! I embody your
ultimate powers!
My oratory advances on your vaunted Mystery! This
breath dispels your braggart fears! I sing your
form at last
behind your concrete & iron walls inside your fortress
of rubber & translucent silicon shields in filtered
cabinets and baths of lathe oil,
My voice resounds through robot glove boxes & ignot
cans and echoes in electric vaults inert of atmo-
sphere,
I enter with spirit out loud into your fuel rod drums
underground on soundless thrones and beds of
lead
O density! This weightless anthem trumpets transcendent
through hidden chambers and breaks through
iron doors into the Infernal Room!
Over your dreadful vibration this measured harmony
floats audible, these jubilant tones are honey and
milk and wine-sweet water
Poured on the stone black floor, these syllables are
barley groats I scatter on the Reactor's core,
I call your name with hollow vowels, I psalm your Fate
close by, my breath near deathless ever at your
side
to Spell your destiny, I set this verse prophetic on your
mausoleum walls to seal you up Eternally with
Diamond Truth! O doomed Plutonium.

II

The Bar surveys Plutonian history from midnight
lit with Mercury Vapor streetlamps till in dawn's
early light
he contemplates a tranquil politic spaced out between
Nations' thought-forms proliferating bureaucratic
& horrific arm'd, Satanic industries projected sudden
with Five Hundred Billion Dollar Strength
around the world same time this text is set in Boulder,
Colorado before front range of Rocky Mountains
twelve miles north of Rocky Flats Nuclear Facility in
United States of North America, Western Hemi-
sphere
of planet Earth six months and fourteen days around
our Solar System in a Spiral Galaxy
the local year after Dominion of the last God nineteen
hundred seventy eight
Completed as yellow hazed dawn clouds brighten East,
Denver city white below
Blue sky transparent rising empty deep & spacious to a
morning star high over the balcony
above some autos sat with wheels to curb downhill
from Flatiron's jagged pine ridge,
sunlit mountain meadows sloped to rust-red sandstone
cliffs above brick townhouse roofs
as sparrows waked whistling through Marine Street's
summer green leafed trees.

III

This ode to you O Poets and Orators to come, you
father Whitman as I join your side, you Congress
and American people,
you present meditators, spiritual friends & teachers,
you O Master of the Diamond Arts,
Take this wheel of syllables in hand, these vowels and
consonants to breath's end
take this inhalation of black poison to your heart, breath
out this blessing from your breast on our creation
forests cities oceans deserts rocky flats and mountains
in the Ten Directions pacify with exhalation,
enrich this Plutonian Ode to explode its empty thunder
through earthen thought-worlds
Magnetize this howl with heartless compassion, destroy
this mountain of Plutonium with ordinary mind
and body speech,
thus empower this Mind-guard spirit gone out, gone
out, gone beyond, gone beyond me, Wake space,
so Ah!


Allen Ginsberg

GaryC1968
07-14-2013, 10:30 AM
I could have gotten out of the car to get a nice shot of Albuquerque in the background, but it was hot outside. ;)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQwvVP2_q4c

TCK
07-14-2013, 10:33 AM
During Season 54, Miss Barefootgypsy sent me this song.
I have never connected with a song as fast as I did this one. I tried and tried to play it, but I am one of those "heart on the sleeve" types, and this song really hit me hard. I just could not get it out.
When I saw this weeks theme, I figured it was time to try again.
Thanks gypsy- I do love this song so. And thank you alemarco for giving me a chance to play this one. I hope you enjoy learning about the story here.
Here's my entry-an inspirational song about hope, a bird (shocker, right?), and a bloke named Charlie.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDV6kmsHCHM

decaturcomp
07-14-2013, 12:56 PM
Your typical submarine disaster song...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41YTRJS3ZvQ&feature=c4-overview&list=UUa57R-HT-UlbHxQ0i2hy7yw

J-Peg
07-14-2013, 01:39 PM
Great theme, alemarco! Lots of possibilities.

One question - is multi-tracking allowed or are we sticking to one takes this week?

alemarco
07-14-2013, 04:17 PM
One question - is multi-tracking allowed or are we sticking to one takes this week?

Multi-tracking is definitely allowed. Originals are allowed and encouraged. Use as many takes as you need.

Just make sure there is a ukulele played somewhere in the video.

librainian
07-14-2013, 04:42 PM
This is my official entry. I may manage a bonus entry later in the week. This song relates to an inspirational story about the founding of the Crossnore school in South Carolina. The youtube video has some links in the comments for more information about Eustace and Mary Martin Sloop.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-AZ7FK8yE4

pabrizzer
07-15-2013, 12:55 AM
A bonus track original - Harvest of Hate.
If you didn't see Malala's speech at the UN check it out.
A perfect example of "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger".
She was so impressive!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ww1Uv-y2K4w

Shady Wilbury
07-15-2013, 12:58 AM
Thanks Alemarco - great season!

I always appreciate a chance to use my Spanish. Although I'm practically fluent, I don't get much opportunity, living in the UK. I had a shot at 'Veracruz', by Warren Zevon, about the US invasion of Veracruz in 1914. Possibly one more coming up later this week.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4hpDP8CvAY&feature=youtu.be

chrimess
07-15-2013, 01:54 AM
Great theme, thanks for hosting, official entry 'We didn't start the fire'.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgNQDrEi-Ig&sns=em

frisbee fred
07-15-2013, 03:05 AM
A bonus track original - Harvest of Hate.
If you didn't see Malala's speech at the UN check it out.
A perfect example of "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger".
She was so impressive!


Wow. That's a powerful song, Pa.

alemarco
07-15-2013, 03:25 AM
wallyboy - Vincent - A definite favorite of mine and one of songs that gave me the original idea to have this theme. So glad that you did it. Very nice job!

decaturcomp - Power - I can't believe that I've never heard this song before considering that Crosby, Nash, and PPM recorded it. Your voice and arrangement fit so well with the lyrics. Beautiful performance!

GaryC1968 - Juarez, Mexico - Great original song about the current events and killings in drug wars. Very sobering to think about the violence and bystander deaths that occur regularly. Thanks for sharing a wonderful performance of this song!

TCK - Charlie and the King - What a wonderful story and song! So glad that you could finally record it! And I definitely enjoyed learning about the story. I had no idea that pigeon racing was a sport and just spent quite a bit of time reading about homing pigeons. Very, very interesting!

decaturcomp - The Thresher - Great job with this song. Very haunting and I really like the rhythmic, driving sound of your strum. Interestingly, Robert Ballad (who found the wreckage of the Titanic) also found the remains of the Thresher. In fact, it was a condition of his funds from the Navy for his Titanic search.

librainian - Miracle in the Hills - That's a pretty impressive couple - doctors, teachers, electricians, lobbyists - accomplishing a lot. Great song! I really liked your short instrumental breaks.

pabrizzer - Harvest of Hate - Thanks for this original about the horrific cycles of hate that occur in this world. Such a beautiful song on a very unfortunate topic.

Shady Wilbury - Veracruz - Glad to give you an opportunity to use some Spanish. Many people don't realize the number of times the US invaded Mexico, and this time was right in the middle of the Mexican Revolution. Great song, thanks for sharing!

chrimess - We Didn't Start the Fire - So happy someone decided to take on this song! I memorized this entire song during high school to help learn my US history after 1945, and I still know the entire thing. I loved your picking and strum patterns which gave some variety to the song. Great job!

wee_ginga_yin
07-15-2013, 03:56 AM
TCK - Charlie and the King - What a wonderful story and song! So glad that you could finally record it! And I definitely enjoyed learning about the story. I had no idea that pigeon racing was a sport and just spent quite a bit of time reading about homing pigeons. Very, very interesting!


The correct name of the song is King of Rome (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fL3E8FRxiw) The Unthanks do a great brass band version of it.
Brass bands, Coal pit Colliers, and pigeon fanciers just go together in the UK.

Dougf
07-15-2013, 06:49 AM
I think it's kind of cool that a song I did for season 72, "Woodstock" by Joni Mitchell, also would have qualified for season 73 (freedom/anarchy), and now would also qualify for season 74, since it was a major historical event of the 60's.

decaturcomp
07-15-2013, 07:06 AM
decaturcomp - Power - I can't believe that I've never heard this song before considering that Crosby, Nash, and PPM recorded it.

I think it was usually at festivals, Bread and Roses, etc. It seems to have been in PP&Ms regular live set for a while. Here's everybody in the world singing it at a MUSE event.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkiU9nv4C_w

alemarco
07-15-2013, 08:24 AM
I think it's kind of cool that a song I did for season 72, "Woodstock" by Joni Mitchell, also would have qualified for season 73 (freedom/anarchy), and now would also qualify for season 74, since it was a major historical event of the 60's.

I was actually thinking that when you reposted it last week!

frisbee fred
07-15-2013, 08:58 AM
Only had time for one take today. I enjoy this song by Matt Kearney because it is so real. Here is the description from his web site: "One of the most gripping stories on the album comes on its finale, "Rochester". Paying homage to Kearney's father, the final song also gives listeners a slice of Americana. Kearney reveals, "It's this very folk song that I wrote about my dad. My grandpa ran an illegal gambling ring in Rochester, NY out of a cigar shop, and my father lived through that. Then, he became a lawyer, went into the army, followed Pink Floyd through Europe and moved to Hawaii where he met my mother. I wrote about my family, friends, and loved ones. This album is a documentary not a drama."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kCTVeKS1aec

decaturcomp
07-15-2013, 09:30 AM
I don't know if Steve Earl is our current day Woody Guthrie but he certainly has a lot of things on his mind to write songs about. In recent seasons we've had songs of his about the blitz, a hawk, new orleans and his old friend the blues. This song really made me angry when I first heard it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qx3cb8FWaVQ

pabrizzer
07-15-2013, 10:23 AM
I don't know if Steve Earl is our current day Woody Guthrie but he certainly has a lot of things on his mind to write songs about. In recent seasons we've had songs of his about the blitz, a hawk, new orleans and his old friend the blues. This song really made me angry when I first heard it.

Great job on a very disturbing song Alan.
This shows that Steve understands better than most the mind set of the extremists. They are not evil or cowards. They are often fervent believers. They die happily for their cause.
But that doesn't stop me from resenting and hating them.
Shooting people delivering polio vaccines.
Shooting a girl because she is encouraging school attendance.
Hiding females away like possessions.
Calling me an infidel!
Blowing up people on holiday in Bali.
Wanting us all to live under their rules.
Buildings, trains, planes - yes they enrage me.
I hate them because of what they do.
The other thing that Steve understands is that when I decide that 'they' deserve to die -
no matter where 'they' are or what 'they' are doing - I have become just like them.

librainian
07-15-2013, 10:45 AM
A bonus track original - Harvest of Hate.
If you didn't see Malala's speech at the UN check it out.
A perfect example of "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger".
She was so impressive!

Pa, damn this is really good. Really moving. I'm going to add this to my book if you don't mind.

pabrizzer
07-15-2013, 11:05 AM
Pa, damn this is really good. Really moving. I'm going to add this to my book if you don't mind.

Go for it - I have PMed you the lyrics.

DWitt
07-15-2013, 11:25 AM
I don't know if Steve Earl is our current day Woody Guthrie but he certainly has a lot of things on his mind to write songs about. In recent seasons we've had songs of his about the blitz, a hawk, new orleans and his old friend the blues. This song really made me angry when I first heard it.


I love this song—great job with it. Thanks for this!

On Earle's many interests: I found myself alongside Steve Earle at an anti-inequality protest, back when I was living in Nashville. So there's another thing on his mind . . .

decaturcomp
07-15-2013, 12:12 PM
(sorry for butting in, but) this exchange is just one of the things that makes the seasons so wonderful:

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/images/misc/quote_icon.png Originally Posted by librainian http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/images/buttons/viewpost-right.png (http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1327291#post1327291)
Pa, damn this is really good. Really moving. I'm going to add this to my book if you don't mind.

(to which Brian replied)

Go for it - I have PMed you the lyrics.

redpaul1
07-15-2013, 12:53 PM
I haven't really thought of anything yet, beyond "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" - which I immediately discounted on account of its length - I wouldn't want anyone to have to sit through 6 & a half minutes of my caterwauling. But it (thinking about TWotEF) set off a mental lightbulb, so I looked it (TWotEF) up in Wikipedia, scrolled to the bottom of the page and found there, to my delight, what I rather hoped I would find.

So, without any more ado... Ladeeez'n'gennermen! I present to you:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Songs_based_on_actual_events

Thank me later (but please don't do 'Smoke On The Water) :)

librainian
07-15-2013, 01:32 PM
Great find... thanks a lot!

peewee
07-15-2013, 01:45 PM
Hi All,

Here's an entry, it's a plagiarized/modified/updated Woody Guthrie song with found audio.
Vigilante (zimmer) Man
The lyrics required a surprisingly small amount of modification.

http://youtu.be/zdI6cDEQVEo

http://youtu.be/zdI6cDEQVEo

chrimess
07-15-2013, 01:59 PM
This is an absolute standout, Pete! Out of nearly three quarters of a century seasons, that is.


Hi All,

Here's an entry, it's a plagiarized/modified/updated Woody Guthrie song with found audio.
Vigilante (zimmer) Man
The lyrics required a surprisingly small amount of modification.

http://youtu.be/zdI6cDEQVEo

http://youtu.be/zdI6cDEQVEo

peewee
07-15-2013, 02:25 PM
This is an absolute standout, Pete! Out of nearly three quarters of a century seasons, that is.

Thanks Christian for the praise. I really appreciate it. It felt good to get this one done.
Maybe those outside of the US media bubble don't know what this is referring to..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trayvon_Martin

TCK
07-15-2013, 02:34 PM
We are not worthy. This is unreal Peewee...
Hi All,

Here's an entry, it's a plagiarized/modified/updated Woody Guthrie song with found audio.
Vigilante (zimmer) Man
The lyrics required a surprisingly small amount of modification.

http://youtu.be/zdI6cDEQVEo

http://youtu.be/zdI6cDEQVEo

GinnyT11
07-15-2013, 02:48 PM
Hi All, Here's an entry, it's a plagiarized/modified/updated Woody Guthrie song with found audio.
Vigilante (zimmer) Man The lyrics required a surprisingly small amount of modification.


This is a breathtaking blend of music, writing, history and immediacy. It took a perfect communion of all the key brain cells to make this, and you should be very proud.
I especially liked the high-picking extra track.

pabrizzer
07-15-2013, 03:17 PM
Hi All,

Here's an entry, it's a plagiarized/modified/updated Woody Guthrie song with found audio.
Vigilante (zimmer) Man
The lyrics required a surprisingly small amount of modification.

http://youtu.be/zdI6cDEQVEo


Gee peewee - just an amazing video.
Yes we got the most recent news - not guilty.
Was big in the news here.
Your video said it all.
Not guilty .... to quote Mr Zimmerman....."these assholes - they always get away"......

Astoundingly relevant - brilliant work Mr PeeWee sir.

DWitt
07-15-2013, 03:44 PM
Hi All,

Here's an entry, it's a plagiarized/modified/updated Woody Guthrie song with found audio.
Vigilante (zimmer) Man
The lyrics required a surprisingly small amount of modification.


Thanks for your work here. Very well done.

myrnaukelele
07-15-2013, 03:44 PM
Going back to the 1800s...
In 1845 nearly 8 million people lived in Ireland. Ten years later just 4 million people remained. It is estimated that 2 million people starved to death and 2 million more emigrated. Many died on the "coffin ships" as they sailed across the Atlantic.
This song is dedicated to my great-grandparents - all eight of whom emigrated from Ireland between 1848 and 1852.

http://youtu.be/EXmtdBsOfZQ

pabrizzer
07-15-2013, 03:55 PM
(sorry for butting in, but) this exchange is just one of the things that makes the seasons so wonderful:

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/images/misc/quote_icon.png Originally Posted by librainian http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/images/buttons/viewpost-right.png (http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1327291#post1327291)
Pa, damn this is really good. Really moving. I'm going to add this to my book if you don't mind.

(to which Brian replied)

Go for it - I have PMed you the lyrics.

It gets even better Alan.
I asked for the librarian's arrangement of And She Was which he quickly sent.
If you haven't checked it out it was tops and well worth a look.

decaturcomp
07-15-2013, 04:30 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsNzxwQlodQ&feature=c4-overview&list=UUa57R-HT-UlbHxQ0i2hy7yw

librainian
07-15-2013, 05:43 PM
Going back to the 1800s...
In 1845 nearly 8 million people lived in Ireland. Ten years later just 4 million people remained. It is estimated that 2 million people starved to death and 2 million more emigrated. Many died on the "coffin ships" as they sailed across the Atlantic.
This song is dedicated to my great-grandparents - all eight of whom emigrated from Ireland between 1848 and 1852.

So sweetly sung! Great performance.

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
07-15-2013, 07:11 PM
Hi All,

Here's an entry, it's a plagiarized/modified/updated Woody Guthrie song with found audio.
Vigilante (zimmer) Man
The lyrics required a surprisingly small amount of modification.

http://youtu.be/zdI6cDEQVEo

http://youtu.be/zdI6cDEQVEo


Telling it like it most unfortunately still is. Merci beaucoup.

mikef
07-15-2013, 09:58 PM
Just wanted to say, this is a clever and rather excellent theme! :)

UPDATE: Just been through the playlist so far... top stuff... keep 'em coming. I feel it's going to be on of those weeks that introduces me to lots of new stuff, which is always a bonus!

DWitt
07-16-2013, 12:59 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsNzxwQlodQ&feature=c4-overview&list=UUa57R-HT-UlbHxQ0i2hy7yw

Another favorite song of mine, and very well done! I just last night put a bookmark to the chords/lyrics of this one in my to-learn queue, actually!

redpaul1
07-16-2013, 01:47 AM
Going back to the 1800s...
In 1845 nearly 8 million people lived in Ireland. Ten years later just 4 million people remained. It is estimated that 2 million people starved to death and 2 million more emigrated. Many died on the "coffin ships" as they sailed across the Atlantic.
About ten years ago, I was reading the exchanges in the comments on a St Patrick's Day Op-Ed in the New York Times (a time when the glow from the Good Friday Agreement was still strong & the roar of the Celtic Tiger in full throat): "Oh for pity's sake," ran the (typical) comments from Ireland. "The Potato Famine was over 150 years ago. Get over it." "Hey!" came the response from Irish-Americans. "Don't piss on our heritage!" (I paraphrase, but you get the idea).

Christine Kinealy, in her essay “The Great Irish Famine—A Dangerous Memory” (The Great Famine and the Irish Diaspora in America. Ed. Arthur Gribben. Amherst: U of Mass P, 1999. 239-54), has this to say about how debate on the Famine is conducted today in Ireland, and in the UK:


The relations between the two islands have now reached a maturity which allows us to look at our history objectively and to tell the story as it was… After all, the Famine is not just an Irish event, it was just as much a British event, a shared experience. (ellipsis original)

As the debates in the NYT show however, that's not a view that is held by many Irish Americans, for whom identity is rooted in the Famine, descendants of the archetypal Irish peasant: desolate, poor and anti-British.

So, not looking to pee in anyone's Cheerios here: these are just the facts, sir and/or ma'am, just the facts:

Let's start with the official census figures for Ireland from 1841-1911 and again for 1926 (no census in Ireland in 1921, for obvious reasons):

1841, 8,175,124
1851, 6,552,385
1861, 5,798,967
1871, 5,412,377
1881, 5,174,836
1891, 4,704,750
1901, 4,458,775
1911, 4,390,219
1926, 4,228,553

In other words, the population of Ireland didn't halve between 1841 & 1851, the height of the famine. It fell by 1.6 million. It hadn't even halved by 1926 (admittedly, at 52%, it was close to halving, but by then the Irish government was using emigration as a macro-economic policy - exporting its unemployment problem to the UK, the US & the rest of the world).

There's no denying that a fall of 20% in any population over a 10 year period is a catastrophic decline. Further, if you make estimates for what the population would have likely been in 1851 had the potato crop not failed, the effective fall in population was nearer 25%-30%. But if you are trying to estimates deaths caused by famine, you can't sensibly count the unborn. No-one was counting the dead at the time (or rather, no-one was collating the, numerous, counts of the dead), so you have to infer that figure by estimating the numbers who emigrated.

All the estimates for emigration during this period that I have seen quote a number of approximately 1 million, yielding a figure therefore of around 600,000 for deaths during the famine. Not all of these deaths would have been caused directly by the famine either - and it's worth noting that most of the deaths caused by the famine were from disease (particularly on the coffin ships), rather than from starvation (though of course starvation is a prime cause of susceptiblity to disease) - but old age and childhood diseases would be killers at any time. In all therefore, you're looking at numbers of deaths resulting from the famine of around (of the order of) 500,000, not 2 million.

500,000 deaths from hunger and disease in the richest and most powerful country in the world is still a shocking statistic - and a shocking indictment. The UK government must have been shamed to see famine relief being sent from the Ottoman Empire, and most notably from the Choctaw nation, whose own quasi-genocidal experience along the Trail of Tears, left them in no doubt what the Irish peasantry were suffering.

As to emigration, however, the famine merely accelerated a trend that had been going on since the end of the Napoleonic wars. Approximately 1.5 million Irish emigrated between 1815 & 1845. Another 1.5 million were to emigrate in the next 10 years. Those emigrating tended to be young and relatively (relatively!!!) better-off (as evidenced by the fact that they could afford passage, no matter how squalid the conditions they endured). Such self-selection also worked to raise the mortality rates among those remaining in Ireland.

So, between 1841 & 1851 about 500,000 died as a result of the famine (500,000 too many), and about 1 million emigrated. The population of Ireland entered a long-term decline (though many in the early 19th Century were already arguing that Ireland was dangerously overpopulated, hence the already high rates of emigration before the famine), bottoming out at around 4 million in the middle of the 20th century. The Famine, catastrophic and terrrible as it was, was responsible only for part of that decline, however, and it (the population decline) certainly didn't all happen in the 10 years following the failure of the potato crop in 1845.

Indeed, emigration has been a constant dimension of Irish identity for at least the past 200 years, as President Mary Robinson pointed out in her ("State of the Union"-style) address to a joint session of the Irish Parliament in 1995:


After all, emigration is not just a chronicle of sorrow and regret. It is also a powerful story of contribution and adaptation. In fact, I have become more convinced each year that this great narrative of dispossession and belonging, which so often had its origins in sorrow and leave-taking, has become - with a certain amount of historic irony - one of the treasures of our society.

Turning to the Famine, she went on to say:

The weight of the past, the researches of our local interpreters and the start of the remembrance of the famine all, in my view, point us towards a single reality: that commemoration is a moral act, just as our relation in this country to those who have left it is a moral relationship. We have too much at stake in both not to be rigorous.

We cannot have it both ways. We cannot want a complex present and still yearn for a simple past. I was very aware of that when I visited the refugee camps in Somalia and more recently in Tanzania and Zaire. The thousands of men and women and children who came to those camps were, as the Irish of the 1840s were, defenceless in the face of catastrophe. Knowing our own history, I saw the tragedy of their hunger as a human disaster. We, of all people, know it is vital that it be carefully analysed so that their children and their children's children be spared that ordeal. We realize that while a great part of our concern for their situation, as Irish men and women who have a past which includes famine, must be at practical levels of help, another part of it must consist of a humanitarian perspective which springs directly from our self-knowledge as a people. Famine is not only humanly destructive, it is culturally disfiguring. The Irish who died [in the Famine] were men and women with plans and dreams of future achievements. It takes from their humanity and individuality to consider them merely as victims.

An Address to the Houses of the Oireachtas
(Irish Parliament and Senate)
Feb 1995
by President of Ireland Mary Robinson
Cherishing the Irish Diaspora..

Me? I think the Pogues have the best take on all this, so I'll leave you with the last two verses to 'Thousands Are Sailing' ("where e'er we go, we celebrate/The land that makes us refugees" - a line I suspect that would resonate among many an ethnic community), while I go off to oppress some peasants:

Thousands are sailing
Again across the ocean
Where the hand of opportunity
Draws tickets in a lottery
Postcards we're mailing
Of sky-blue skies and oceans
From rooms the daylight never sees
Where lights don't glow on Christmas trees
But we dance to the music
And we dance

Thousands are sailing
Across the western ocean
Where the hand of opportunity
Draws tickets in a lottery
Where e'er we go, we celebrate
The land that makes us refugees
From fear of Priests with empty plates
From guilt and weeping effigies
And we dance

A personal note: My family first emigrated in the 1890s. My grandfather worked on the construction of the NYC subway. Family circumstances brought him back to Ireland, to the smallholding situated in the midst of the bleakness of the Burren (Google 'Caherbullog, Co. Clare'). My grandmother never forgave him: my mother (born 1919 i.e., before partition!) liked (sadly, she has acute senile dementia & is now quite mute) to tell the story of her mother on many an occasion flinging open the door to this very view 55981 and crying "And this is what you brought us back to!" I also remember as a young boy being driven around in the pony & trap ([I]exactly like a scene from "The Quiet Man"), with my grandad pointing out the famine pits - as well as the Civil War battle sites.

Four of their daughters (they had 6 girls, the two eldest born in NYC - and then finally they got the boy(!)) returned or emigrated to the US as soon as they turned 16 or 17 - my mum, the youngest, followed her middle sister to London and a career in nursing, beginning in 1936, ending 50 years later in 1986 (she met my Dad, a Welsh steel-worker, in Trincomalee, Sri Lanka in 1946, but that's another story for another day). All my cousins, like all good Irish-Americans(!), joined the police force, although they're all retired now. One was a Secret Serviceman, a presidential bodyguard in fact (Kennedy -> Reagan), another a detective in the SFPD. But, hey, we've all got stories.

elmann
07-16-2013, 03:24 AM
Maybe those outside of the US media bubble don't know what this is referring to..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trayvon_Martin
It's everywhere in German news.

DWitt
07-16-2013, 03:45 AM
Okay, I'm following through on my promise to do Sufjan Stevens's "John Wayne Gacy, Jr." for my entry this week. Are you ready for something sad, distressing, quiet, and a bit disturbingly sweet? Yeah, well, here it is anyhow:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPKsz2JRXn4

Dougf
07-16-2013, 04:43 AM
Going back to the 1800s...
In 1845 nearly 8 million people lived in Ireland. Ten years later just 4 million people remained. It is estimated that 2 million people starved to death and 2 million more emigrated. Many died on the "coffin ships" as they sailed across the Atlantic.
This song is dedicated to my great-grandparents - all eight of whom emigrated from Ireland between 1848 and 1852.
http://youtu.be/EXmtdBsOfZQ

George Bernard Shaw refused to call it a famine, since Ireland was exporting wheat and cattle to England at the time. He called it a starvation.

myrnaukelele
07-16-2013, 10:16 AM
Indeed, emigration has been a constant dimension of Irish identity for at least the past 200 years, as President Mary Robinson pointed out in her ("State of the Union"-style) address to a joint session of the Irish Parliament in 1995:


After all, emigration is not just a chronicle of sorrow and regret. It is also a powerful story of contribution and adaptation. In fact, I have become more convinced each year that this great narrative of dispossession and belonging, which so often had its origins in sorrow and leave-taking, has become - with a certain amount of historic irony - one of the treasures of our society.


redpaul- My apologies for misstating the facts. The Great Hunger by Cecil Woodham-Smith is an informative and comprehensive account of this time in Ireland and the statistics I cited were missremembered from my reading of that text.
Thank you for including the words of Mary Robinson in your response.

I actually considered learning the Pogues 'Thousands Are Sailing' for this Season but that story is not my story. When I discovered the Johnny McEvoy song I knew it was the one I wanted to sing this week - it told the story of my own great-grandparents. Although the verses are specific to the Irish emigration of the 1800s it was the chorus that struck me the most. So many millions have crossed the oceans heading towards an unknown future- the land of their tomorrows. The chorus of this song could pertain to the Chinese crossing the Pacific as well as the Europeans crossing the Atlantic. Emigrants left behind loved ones and homes that most likely they would never see again. But no, their story was not all "sorrow and regret". They dreamed of better lives for themselves and their children and had hopes of brighter days to come.

UkeyDave
07-16-2013, 11:03 AM
We most CERTAINLY are aware of this despicable act here in the UK.
Great and movingly done Peewee.


Thanks Christian for the praise. I really appreciate it. It felt good to get this one done.
Maybe those outside of the US media bubble don't know what this is referring to..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trayvon_Martin

GinnyT11
07-16-2013, 02:25 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YWUhvpXhdE&feature=youtu.be


Here's a song referring to the Civil War, The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down.

Apologies to Joan Baez

strumsilly
07-16-2013, 03:57 PM
had to do this one as I'm staying in a hotel in Wenatchee, WA overlooking the Columbia River. I had only one shot to do this and I never played it before. Luckily it's a 3 chorder. got to love some woody.

Guthrie wrote this after he was hired by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), to write songs. Guthrie was 28 years old and unemployed, and the BPA needed to promote the benefits of building dams. Guthrie moved his family from California to Oregon, and was paid $266 a month to write songs. He came up with 26 songs in 30 days, including this one, which was a tribute to the Columbia River.
I've been out of the seasons loop, I think I said 72 season. sorry

http://youtu.be/QHCPBPa9Hc0

vct33
07-16-2013, 04:04 PM
Finally chose a song but I've got some practicing to do. Lyrics are much tougher than the ukulele for this one.


EDIT: Oh snap! Just going through the playlist and chrimess already did "We Didn't Start the Fire". Now I have to decide if I do it anyway or go back to the drawing board.

~dave~~wave~
07-16-2013, 05:59 PM
George Jackson by the artist formerly known as Robert Zimmerman.

Related topics: Black Panther Party, Soledad Brothers, Rice / Pointexter case.



http://youtu.be/rlLPH6_PETc

TCK
07-16-2013, 07:49 PM
Such a tough song to tackle...we would all like to see it again I am sure. At least I would. I would never even attempt it.
Finally chose a song but I've got some practicing to do. Lyrics are much tougher than the ukulele for this one.


EDIT: Oh snap! Just going through the playlist and chrimess already did "We Didn't Start the Fire". Now I have to decide if I do it anyway or go back to the drawing board.

pabrizzer
07-17-2013, 03:31 AM
Bonus track done for this season - Strange Fruit.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vj_GceM7vsg

alemarco
07-17-2013, 03:32 AM
frisbee fred - Rochester - Beautiful song. I've always liked this song, partially because I also grew up in Rochester, NY. The steady picking gave a really nice foundation for this song. Nice job!

decaturcomp - John Walker's Blues - Very interesting song to show such sympathy for someone who is considered a traitor. It raises the thoughts about to what point we will follow our convictions and beliefs before deciding that the costs to others make it no longer right. Beautiful job!

peewee - Vigilante (zimmer) Man - What a great new version of this song! I love the addition of the dispatcher call over the top. Very powerful commentary on some current events.

myrnaukelele - Famine Song - Lovely! Such a sad song, but with that one idea of hope, starting over in "the land of my tomorrows." For so many immigrants that was the thing to keep them going, a chance to begin again. Wonderful job and great costume!

decaturcomp - Casimir Pulaski Day - For me this song falls into a group of songs with titles that seem disconnected from the lyrics. Just read about Pulaski and learned quite a lot about about the history of Poland in the eighteenth century. Thanks for teaching me that Pulaski was an actually person and for a great version of this song.

DWitt - John Wayne Gacy, Jr. - Love the multi-tracked vocals and your picking on this song. You really captured the haunting quality of the lyrics.

GinnyT11 -Night They Drove Old Dixie Down - Great job! Nice even strumming and I really like the tone of that ukulele.

alemarco
07-17-2013, 03:37 AM
Almost halfway through the week and we've had some amazing entries!

I've loved the variety of song choices and originals. There's a wide range of history that's been covered, but that only scratches the surface of possible songs. Keep up the great work!

ukuLily Mars
07-17-2013, 04:21 AM
I think it's kind of cool that a song I did for season 72, "Woodstock" by Joni Mitchell, also would have qualified for season 73 (freedom/anarchy), and now would also qualify for season 74, since it was a major historical event of the 60's.

Wait'll you see Season 75...

elmann
07-17-2013, 10:55 AM
A song about diremption and escape: Theodor Kramer, an Austrian poet before WW2, fled the Nazis to London, were he lived until 1957 (+1958 in Vienna). His poems have been forbidden and vanished, until they were re-discovered in the 1970s. The singersongwriters Zupfgeigenhansel were the first who set his poems to music.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C23WkigdmgU

decaturcomp
07-17-2013, 10:58 AM
Here's a little Bob Dylan tune you might not have heard before:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roUHtrg8GEo
Written by Bob Dylan (melody based on Trail of the Buffalo).
Recorded by Bob Dylan on "Broadside Sessions" in March of 1963 and may not ever have been released. "A Hard Rain's Gonna Fall" was recorded for "Freewheelin'" in late April of the same year.
Above notes from dylanchords(dot)info

Dougf
07-17-2013, 06:10 PM
It seems hard to believe, but a hundred years ago, women could not vote in most of the world's countries.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQkO2qyVVQo

decaturcomp
07-17-2013, 06:17 PM
One song each from the only war we've ever fought internally without the aid of rival partisan cable "news" networks.
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5w-p4d2l2no

thesillydave
07-17-2013, 08:50 PM
this might not be strictly according to the rules....but...i wanted to do this song...
here's the info from wikipedia..."The song was written after Porter received a challenge while at lunch with some friends.
He claimed he could write a song on any subject. The friends challenged him to write something based on the next thing they heard in the restaurant.
The waiter at an adjoining table then said to the person at that table "Miss Otis regrets she's unable to lunch today"....
so,..the song may or may not be a valid entry....you decide!

http://youtu.be/zpFxcHCeWGE
anyhow...i'll try another just in case this gets booted! cheers y'all!

wee_ginga_yin
07-17-2013, 09:28 PM
A song about Peter Kürten written by Randy Newman done tango style as a bonus.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kDb-ZL11MI

Joko
07-18-2013, 01:28 AM
Seems like I'm Captain Obvious to a lot of these themed weeks, but here it is Thursday already and I haven't seen anyone else try this one. I cut out two verses and still ended up over 5 minutes...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEHqZ2CjWAI

greyghost
07-18-2013, 05:30 AM
Some great entries so far, but so many of these true songs are grim! How about some happier-sounding R&B? (don't listen too closely to the lyrics--it isn't as cheery as it sounds). This song was written by Otis Redding & Steve Cropper about the experience of being on the road, far from home, but not escaping your troubles, and Otis started writing it while staying on a houseboat and, yes, watching the ships roll in. So a true story, but with much smaller concerns than many of the other entries. Enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwI6YwaQMQs&feature=youtu.be

greenie44
07-18-2013, 06:31 AM
I knew I had to do this one as soon as I saw the topic. I think this is one of Dylan's best songs (certainly his best 'true story' song), and he is at the top of my list. There seems to be a little bit of a synch issue with this video, but this was the best I could do with my setup. I hope it doesn't get in the way of the power of this song.

If any of you have not heard this song, you should give it a listen. Thanks for the week's topic!


http://youtu.be/6pONyY8VcO8

DWitt
07-18-2013, 08:09 AM
Had time today for a quick little bonus entry: Camper Van Beethoven's "Sweethearts." Given the reference to Dixon (Illinois) at the beginning—Ronald Reagan's home town—it's safe to say that the "he" refers to Reagan throughout even though he's only named at the end. "The flowers bloom where you have placed them" sounds to me like a description of watching explosions from the pilot's seat.

I haven't really dug more deeply into the lyrics than that. Any reflections from others would be really interesting, as I like this song and this album quite a bit.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_4-z7xoz8w

we tigers
07-18-2013, 10:28 AM
this had to be done. It may be a little bit sloppy, but it's hot over here in the Netherlands... ;)
Enola Gay by OMD.

http://youtu.be/yMDYrIdrY4o

pabrizzer
07-18-2013, 10:41 AM
this had to be done. It may be a little bit sloppy, but it's hot over here in the Netherlands... ;)
Enola Gay by OMD.

Loved the looks at the end - it was brilliant as always.
We shouldn't have such topics to sing about as have cropped up this season.:(

DWitt
07-18-2013, 11:14 AM
History is depressing. At least the history we write songs about. Really liked this, BTW, We Tigers.

More depressing ideas:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Music_about_the_September_11_attacks
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Songs_about_the_extermination_of_indigeno us_peoples
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_songs_about_killers

I'm still hoping someone does "Kenesaw Mountain Landis," which, hey, is just about organized crime and corruption. So that's relatively light. Plus the treatment is somewhat whimsical.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSQeXH1AB6M

TCK
07-18-2013, 03:53 PM
This is BRILLIANT! I have one I am working on to commemorate (that is not a great word for it) the anniversary of the first atomic detonation...July 16th 1945 (can't turn science teacher off even in the summer). It is no where near as good a fit as this one is, which I had COMPLETELY forgotten about. So well done guys.
this had to be done. It may be a little bit sloppy, but it's hot over here in the Netherlands... ;)
Enola Gay by OMD.

http://youtu.be/yMDYrIdrY4o

alemarco
07-18-2013, 04:04 PM
strumsilly - Roll on Columbia - It's interesting to have an historical song around a river. A nice commentary about the continuity of nature despite the changing human events all around. Nice job and gorgeous location!

~dave~~wave~ - George Jackson - George Jackson is a very interesting figure. A very eventful life and death, his story continued to be a cultural force long after he died. I enjoyed your rendition of this song a lot.

elmann - Andere, die das Land - That's a beautiful poem and song setting. Any particular reasons why his poetry was banned in some places? Great job!

dougf - Sister Suffragette - I grew up with this song from Mary Poppins. Also growing up very near Susan B. Anthony's home, I learned a lot about the fight for women's suffrage. There were many, many women both in the USA and in UK who fought hard their whole lives for suffrage and never saw it made law. Great job and I loved the slide show!

sillydave - Miss Otis Regrets - Well, maybe not a true event of historical significance, but a true event, sort of. A fun little song! Being lynched by an angry mob would certainly prevent someone from lunching the following day. Definitely counts in my book! Great job!

joko - American Pie - I was wondering if anyone would do this song. A classic for this theme. I've always loved this song and I was happily singing along the entire time. Well done!

greyghost - Sittin' on the Dock of the Bay - I never knew that this song was actually about events from Otis Reading's life. I agree that it's nice to have some happier songs in this week of many depressing subjects. Very nice job!

greenie44 - Hattie Carroll - Great version of this song! William Zanzinger said later in life that this song haunted him, never letting this story die. A true testament to the power of music to teach and remind us of history. Thanks!

wetigers - Enola Gay - Wow! That was wonderful. I always love the uke and glock combination, but on this song it was especially great.

alemarco
07-18-2013, 04:17 PM
We shouldn't have such topics to sing about as have cropped up this season.:(


History is depressing. At least the history we write songs about.

I agree that the topics this week are (for the most part) depressing and unfortunate. It was actually something I thought about quite a bit before I settled on this theme.

Music is such a powerful vehicle and has such a wide audience that it can effectively expose people to important stories (both widely known and more obscure) and continually bring new beauty to ugly memories. That's why I love it when musicians incorporate history or current events into their music.

But definitely keep looking for some happy historical songs. They're actually pretty hard to find!

pabrizzer
07-18-2013, 05:42 PM
Oh the songs are important.
I wish the reasons for the songs hadn't occured in the first place.
I am determined to find an uplifting song though and I may have found one I can do.
There have been a couple though -
Miracle in the Hills by the librarian was a very good tribute to an inspiringly innovative couple.:)

TCK
07-18-2013, 06:00 PM
Just the facts-
On December 8th 1946, my mother, Mary Susan Tripoli was born in Chicago Illinois. She was named Mary because the Catholic hospital she was born at named all the little girls that day Mary as it was the "Feast of the Immaculate Conception". You would think being brought into the world on a holy day of obligation and taking your name from a principal saint would make you a pious soul...but not my ma.
My ma was born to kick her heels up, and will do so as long as she lives.She was born to smoke, drink, and dance the hoochy coo, and there ain't a darn thing that will ever stop her. We have never referred to her as Mary...she is a runaround Sue through and through.
But we have to rewind a bit...that was 1961. We need to go back to 1958. My mom is one of the MANY young ladies of her generation to be smitten by an Italian junkie (he was reportedly addicted to heroin at fifteen) from the Bronx with a golden voice and a knack for Doo-Wop, Mr. Dion Dimucci. 'Course, he was really just a vehicle to sell black music to white kids (Justin Beiber?), but he was, in spite of the silly lyrics, pretty darn talented.
OK- now jump to October 13th, 1972. Mary's wild days are over (yeah right) as she has just had her first child. This little fellow is going to quietly sit in a corner for the next 14 years while he watches his mom go through her day, records and radio constantly blasting. Mom had lots of favorites...all those great Motown sides...the Eagles (not as great)...always one constant though. Dion would come on and it was religious. We ALL sang along-we all knew all the words, I knew them all before I was five.
Forty years later, I still know them all- every one. I still sing them at the top of my lungs every time they come on, and that is why I was so bummed when I read the post for this week....Facts, History- but I have already done "American Pie"-argh.
What does American Pie have to do with Dion? Dion was on that tour, and he was the first person that Buddy Holly approached to join in on the plane ride. $35 bucks to not freeze all night, but Dion tells it that while he was about to make a million, he remembered $35 being the magic number his family had to scrape up to pay rent when he was a kid (romanticism be damned- he wanted to score I am sure). He made it to the next leg of the tour only to find that there were no survivors- the day the music died.
In any event, back to Dion. Today is his birthday. He is 74, July 18th, 1939. He has been clean a long time, and is still recording and doing shows occasionally. Figure there is nothing like those old 45's, and I am sure Runaround Sue will attest to that fact as well. He had a bit of a rebirth- not as staggering as Marvin Gaye's, but still pretty poignant, in the late sixties (I think everyone had a rebirth then, I was not around, but it seems that stuff got pretty heavy).
In any event- he was the first person to record this, and I am sorry to say I wreck it with my single take approach- still a great song though.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-w8_NiZ-hRM
You guys seem to have been amused by all that crap last week, so I figured I would run it by you again ;)

pabrizzer
07-19-2013, 12:07 AM
Bonus.
My voice is on the way out. I actually led our ukulele club’s gathering last night and the voice is showing the effects. Only 15 of us because we have 65 members currently in Hawaii with our fearless leader Liz.

But here’s a more upbeat song that I was to determined to do for this season.
It is called Calypso about Jacques Cousteau’s research vessel and is written by John Denver.
I remember enjoying watching Jacques Cousteau’s documentaries.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIp6cpTvWYY

GinnyT11
07-19-2013, 03:08 AM
this had to be done. It may be a little bit sloppy, but it's hot over here in the Netherlands... ;)
Enola Gay by OMD.


This is an extremely wonderful performance! I can see Michael counting at the end.

I once worked with a woman named Enola. She said her mother had named her that because it is "alone" spelled backwards, and her mother was alone (at least without her husband) when she gave birth. But the woman Enola was born after WWII and most everyone she met made an Enola Gay reference. What a burden.

greenie44
07-19-2013, 03:30 AM
OK, so this is definitely a 'bonus'. It isn't really about a specific fact, but one of the key lines in the chorus is "Just the facts!", and I kept thinking about it this week. I ended up doing some multitrack instruments behind it and had some fun.

The song is by a band called Television (one of my many favorites), and was originally released in the late 70s. There is a touch of distortion on the live vocals, but I couldn't figure out how to fix the issue in the time I have before I leave on a trip. I hope you all enjoy it a bit.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-Pa8MfsrjU&feature=player_detailpage

At least it's not depressing!

mikef
07-19-2013, 04:32 AM
Here's my ukulele take on the disco-pop classic "Rasputin" by Boney M.
You can't tell, but I did have a revolutionary star on my beret albeit historically inaccurate. It's a lovely hot day here in Wales today yet STILL there's too much wind noise being picked up... hey ho. Too hot to record inside anyway... hope you like it :)


http://youtu.be/oE0kfsPN4sw

wee_ginga_yin
07-19-2013, 05:09 AM
Just the facts-
On December 8th 1946, my mother, Mary Susan Tripoli was born in Chicago Illinois. She was named Mary because the Catholic hospital she was born at named all the little girls that day Mary as it was the "Feast of the Immaculate Conception". You would think being brought into the world on a holy day of obligation and taking your name from a principal saint would make you a pious soul...but not my ma.
My ma was born to kick her heels up, and will do so as long as she lives.She was born to smoke, drink, and dance the hoochy coo, and there ain't a darn thing that will ever stop her. We have never referred to her as Mary...she is a runaround Sue through and through.
But we have to rewind a bit...that was 1961. We need to go back to 1958. My mom is one of the MANY young ladies of her generation to be smitten by an Italian junkie (he was reportedly addicted to heroin at fifteen) from the Bronx with a golden voice and a knack for Doo-Wop, Mr. Dion Dimucci. 'Course, he was really just a vehicle to sell black music to white kids (Justin Beiber?), but he was, in spite of the silly lyrics, pretty darn talented.
OK- now jump to October 13th, 1972. Mary's wild days are over (yeah right) as she has just had her first child. This little fellow is going to quietly sit in a corner for the next 14 years while he watches his mom go through her day, records and radio constantly blasting. Mom had lots of favorites...all those great Motown sides...the Eagles (not as great)...always one constant though. Dion would come on and it was religious. We ALL sang along-we all knew all the words, I knew them all before I was five.
Forty years later, I still know them all- every one. I still sing them at the top of my lungs every time they come on, and that is why I was so bummed when I read the post for this week....Facts, History- but I have already done "American Pie"-argh.
What does American Pie have to do with Dion? Dion was on that tour, and he was the first person that Buddy Holly approached to join in on the plane ride. $35 bucks to not freeze all night, but Dion tells it that while he was about to make a million, he remembered $35 being the magic number his family had to scrape up to pay rent when he was a kid (romanticism be damned- he wanted to score I am sure). He made it to the next leg of the tour only to find that there were no survivors- the day the music died.
In any event, back to Dion. Today is his birthday. He is 74, July 18th, 1939. He has been clean a long time, and is still recording and doing shows occasionally. Figure there is nothing like those old 45's, and I am sure Runaround Sue will attest to that fact as well. He had a bit of a rebirth- not as staggering as Marvin Gaye's, but still pretty poignant, in the late sixties (I think everyone had a rebirth then, I was not around, but it seems that stuff got pretty heavy).
In any event- he was the first person to record this, and I am sorry to say I wreck it with my single take approach- still a great song though.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-w8_NiZ-hRM
You guys seem to have been amused by all that crap last week, so I figured I would run it by you again ;)

Yo! Frankie (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94VA0QNebZk)

J-Peg
07-19-2013, 06:30 AM
This song just screams for the multitrack treatment, but I'm not gonna have time. So I recorded this real quick on my phone.

Some of you may have heard the first verse of this song and not realized that it was an actual song with multiple verses and a bridge and stuff and not just a TV theme song. It's the Barenaked Ladies' "The History of Everything."


http://youtu.be/UFrG3dht4f4

pabrizzer
07-19-2013, 06:50 AM
This song just screams for the multitrack treatment, but I'm not gonna have time. So I recorded this real quick on my phone.

Some of you may have heard the first verse of this song and not realized that it was an actual song with multiple verses and a bridge and stuff and not just a TV theme song. It's the Barenaked Ladies' "The History of Everything."


Great to have a fun song join the season!
Well done! And well sung!

DWitt
07-19-2013, 06:56 AM
I found time for Camper Van Beethoven's "Sweethearts" yesterday—Camper fans, though, will remember the song right before that one on the album (Key Lime Pie) . . . "Jack Ruby." I couldn't do "Sweethearts" without doing "Jack Ruby" as well, given our theme this week! So, here's another bonus:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvmeZiB9wDQ

strumsilly
07-19-2013, 07:27 AM
BONUS
always liked this tune, and as I'm in Chicago now, had to do it. it's been a traveling week,Atlantic coast to the Columbia river back to Savannah to Lake Michigan.

from Wiki:

The song refers to both the riots at the 1968 Democratic National Convention (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1968_Democratic_National_Convention) in Chicago (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago), as well as the trial of the Chicago Eight (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_Eight), where protesters at the convention were charged with intent to incite a riot. The first line of the song: "So your brother's bound and gagged, and they've chained him to a chair" refers to Bobby Seale (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Seale),[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_%28Graham_Nash_song%29#cite_note-1) the defendant who was gagged and bound to a chair in the courtroom following repeated outbursts. On Four Way Street (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Way_Street), Nash dedicates the song to "Mayor Daley (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_J._Daley)".

The line "Won't you please come to Chicago just to sing" refers to Nash pleading with band mates Stephen Stills (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Stills) and Neil Young (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Young) to come to Chicago to protest the Chicago Eight trial.
CSN and CSNY (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crosby,_Stills,_Nash_%26_Young) still play the song live.

http://youtu.be/_dSCGGFGrZQ

southside mike
07-19-2013, 07:43 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esY8gNzbyxo
This is the story of Ray Kroc the owner of McDonald's and how it all came about. Ray was selling milk shake mixers that would mix five at a time. Because of the McDonald brothers buying so many of these mixers it made Ray pay close attention to what they were doing. He tried to buy their restaurant from them ( the Big M ) and they refused So Ray opened up a similar restaurant which he named McDonalds right across the street and drove them out of business. It is said that Ray opened up a McDonald's near every Mom and Pop hamburger restaurant he could find in California. I guess sometimes it does take an SOB to make a dream reality. "If any of my competitors were drowning, I'd stick a hose in their mouth and turn on the water," he said. "It is ridiculous to call this an industry. This is not. This is rat eat rat, dog eat dog. I'll kill 'em, and I'm going to kill 'em before they kill me. Your talking about the American way-of survival of the fittest."
There are also stories about how Kroc would undersell these restaurants to bankruptcy and the family would chose suicide as their only way out of debt, ("stick a hose in their mouth) relates to a practice of people starting up their cars inside of their garage, run a hose from the exhaust into the window, and suffocate, then family would remove the hose. When the insurance adjuster looked at the case it would look like an accident and the family would collect enough to get out of debt.
Anyway Ray became very rich and his restaurants became very popular.
"Grinding it Out" was the name of a book he wrote.
By the time of his death at age 81 in 1984 McDonald's had 7,500 locations in 31 countries and was worth eight billion. His personal fortune was estimated at $500 million. He owned the San Diego Padres.
Today McDonalds employs over one million employees world wide with over 31,000 restaurants in 120 countries.
He was named as one of Time magazine's top 100 people of the twentieth century.
Ronald McDonald House Charities supports seven million families worldwide every year.

Tootler
07-19-2013, 09:30 AM
I'm going back to the 16th century Scotland for my entry.

In 1592, James Stewart, Earl of Moray was staying at his mother's house, Donnibristle in Fife (Just across the Forth from Edinburgh) when he was murdered by George Gordon, Early of Huntly. Huntly had been sent by the king, James VI to arrest Moray but the Huntlys and Morays had a longstanding feud and Huntly took advantage of the situation to eliminate a hated rival. The murder caused a scandal at the time and the ballad dates from the early 17th century, probably not long after the event to which it refers, though the tune is from the late 19th century. I have used two versions of the ballad and rearranged the verses somewhat to make the version I sing here.

There is more detail on the incident in this link: http://www.leopardmag.co.uk/feats/13/lethal-dowry-of-the-bonny-earl

The link describes the tune as a Victorian fake which I think is a little harsh. It's long been part of the "folk process" to put old words to new tunes. It is quite possible the Victorian editors of the book referred to in the link did not have a tune for the ballad so supplied one.


http://youtu.be/Uf8DElxYWH8

Words & Chords

Ye [C] Hielan's an' ye [G] Lowlan's
O, [Am] where hae ye [F] been?
They hae [C] slain the Earl of [G] Moray
And lain [F] him on the [C] green.
He [C] was a braw [Am] gallant
And [Dm] he rode at the [G] ring.
An' the [Am] bonnie Earl of [C] Moray
He [C] micht hae been a [G] king!

Chorus
[F] Lang may his lad[G]y
Look frae [Am] the Castle [F] Doune,
Ere she [Am] see the Earl of [C] Moray
Come [Dm] soundin' [F] through the [C] toun.

Now Huntly lept onto his horse
And tae the king has sped
I've slain the Earl o' Moray
He's lain deid in his bed
He was a braw gallant,
An he played at the glove,
An’ the bonnie Earl o’ moray
He was the Queen’s love. cho

Now way be tae thee, Huntly
And wherefore did ye sae?
I bade you bring him wi' you
But forbade you him to slay.
He was a braw gallant
And he play'd at the ball
An' the Bonnie Earl of Moray
The flower amang them all. cho

Reprise 1st verse. (w/o chorus)

Tootler
07-19-2013, 11:00 AM
And here's a bonus.

This song relates to the Jacobite uprising of 1715. It is thought to have been written by James Hogg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Hogg), the Ettrick Shepherd. He was a contemporary of Sir Walter Scott so it was written about 100 years after the events it relates to.

The "Piper o' Dundee" is an ironical reference to James Carnegie of Finhaven who ran away (or changed sides?) at the Battle of Sherriffmuir (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Sheriffmuir). The second verse is made up of a list of Jacobite pipe airs and the third verse lists some of the major figures in the uprising.

For more on the Jacobite uprisings after 1688, there is a useful Wikipedia entry (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacobite_Rising)


http://youtu.be/AsAXEb3C8p4

Words & Chords

The [Am] piper cam' tae [C] our toun,
Tae [G] our toun, tae our toun
The [Am] piper came tae [C] our toun
And [C] he played bon[G]nie[Am]lie

Chorus:
And [Am] wasna he a rougey, a [G] rougey, a rougey,
And [Am] wasna he a rougey, the [C] piper o' [G] Dun[Am]dee

He [C] play'd a spring the [G] laird to please
A [C] spring brent new from [G] 'yont the seas
And [C] then he gae his [G] bags a squeeze
And [C] played ani[G]ther [Am]key
Chorus

He play'd "The Welcome Ower the Main"
And "Ye's Be Fou and I'se be Fain"
And "Auld Stuart's Back Again"
Wi' muckle mirth and glee.
He play'd "The Kirk", he play'd "The Queen"
"The Mullin Dhu" and "Chevalier"
And "Lang Awa' But Welcome Here"
Sae sweet, sae bonnielie
Chorus

It's some gat swords and some gat nane
And some were dancing mad their lane
And mony a vow o' weir was ta'en
That night at Amulrie.
There was Tillibardine, and Burleigh
And Struan, Keith, and Olgivie,
And brave Carnegie, wha' but he,
The piper o' Dundee.
Chorus

Reprise 1st verse & chorus

Glossary:
brent=advance quickly
fou=drunk
fain=amorous
muckle=a lot
weir=war

pootsie
07-19-2013, 11:06 AM
I have not had a chance to listen yet, Tootler, but I always admire your ability to bring forward some ancient tunes.

pabrizzer
07-19-2013, 11:59 AM
BONUS
always liked this tune, and as I'm in Chicago now, had to do it. it's been a traveling week,Atlantic coast to the Columbia river back to Savannah to Lake Michigan.

from Wiki:

The song refers to both the riots at the 1968 Democratic National Convention (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1968_Democratic_National_Convention) in Chicago (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago), as well as the trial of the Chicago Eight (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_Eight), where protesters at the convention were charged with intent to incite a riot. The first line of the song: "So your brother's bound and gagged, and they've chained him to a chair" refers to Bobby Seale (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Seale),[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_%28Graham_Nash_song%29#cite_note-1) the defendant who was gagged and bound to a chair in the courtroom following repeated outbursts. On Four Way Street (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Way_Street), Nash dedicates the song to "Mayor Daley (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_J._Daley)".

The line "Won't you please come to Chicago just to sing" refers to Nash pleading with band mates Stephen Stills (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Stills) and Neil Young (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Young) to come to Chicago to protest the Chicago Eight trial.
CSN and CSNY (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crosby,_Stills,_Nash_%26_Young) still play the song live.


Just a great take on this one SS.
I am sure glad you have your uke along with you on your trip to give us treats like this.
A lot of important songs done this season IMHO.
Not pleasant topics but important to be remembered.
Your Woody Guthrie river song was more light hearted but even he mentioned the history of that river which wasn't pleasant.

The traffic looks remarkably quiet.

alemarco
07-19-2013, 03:29 PM
mikef - Rasputin - Rasputin is certainly an interesting figure in history. Great uke arrangement! I really enjoyed it.

jpeg - History of Everything - The first verse might be the most well-known, but this song is wonderful. And certainly not easy to sing. Fantastic job getting all those words out so fast!

southside mike - Boom Like That - This song sure tells the dirty side of capitalism and what it can take to get ahead in business. Very impressive uke playing. I especially liked the bass beat you had going!

Tootler - Bonny Earl o' Moray - I hoping to get some traditional ballads from you this season! I'm glad the king chastised Huntly for not following directions. Great job!

alemarco
07-19-2013, 04:11 PM
Now for some bonuses!

pabrizzer - Strange Fruit - Very chilling song. It's so horrible that things like this happen. Well done.

decaturcomp - Cuban Missile Crisis - You've been going to town with this theme, and it's wonderful! The lyrics here are a good reminder that we need to keep perspective about what's important in life and the things that don't really matter in the long run.

decaturcomp - Good Ole Rebel/Lincoln and Liberty - There are two sides to every story, but as they say, the winners get to write the history books. Thanks for these two songs! And I agree, that uke sounds very like a banjo. Works well with these songs.

wee_ginga_yin - In Germany before the war - This song is kind of creepy if you know the story of Peter Kurten. I really liked the tango pattern and the vocal effects; they really add to the mood of the song.

DWitt - Sweethearts - I've never heard that song before (nor had I heard of CVB). At first thought, it seems like the writer is comparing Reagan's attitude as president to his being an actor, where things are straightforward and everything ends well. Very interesting lyrics! Thanks for introducing me to this artist!

TCK - Abraham, Martin, and John - Loved the story about your mother. Beautiful job singing this song!

pabrizzer - Calypso - Nice job! I had no idea this song was about an actual boat. I'm learning new things with every entry this week.

greenie44 - Prove It! - Great rendition. I enjoyed your uke arrangement a lot!

I promise I'll get to the rest of the bonuses tomorrow morning!

southside mike
07-19-2013, 05:48 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKd7d5dJ_0M
Bonus A song about Andy Kaufman. There are so many interpretations that it boggles the mind. The only one I can't find is from the person who wrote it. It is a good reminder of what a unique artist he was.

thesillydave
07-19-2013, 07:42 PM
can't stop...entering....here's another..."and the band played waltzing matilda"

http://youtu.be/LuHWzbcoSSU
cheers!!

wallyboy
07-19-2013, 11:01 PM
great entries makes you think when put into song,
glad american pie has been done nice job, some meaning https://www.cfa.harvard.edu/~jdevor/links/TheMeaningOfAmericanPie.htm

pabrizzer
07-20-2013, 12:46 AM
John D Loudermilk wrote good songs IMHO.
Lament Of a Cherokee Nation (Indian Reservation)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EYxdn8q57w
Would have liked to have done this a lot slower.
Check out his original on YouTube - I think its brill.

Tootler
07-20-2013, 05:00 AM
I have not had a chance to listen yet, Tootler, but I always admire your ability to bring forward some ancient tunes.

Thanks. I hope you enjoy them when you get time to listen.



Tootler - Bonny Earl o' Moray - I hoping to get some traditional ballads from you this season! I'm glad the king chastised Huntly for not following directions. Great job!

Thanks. In fact Huntly got off virtually scot free (pun not intended :D ). After a decent period he was welcomed back at court as he was in favour with the King.

Tootler
07-20-2013, 05:21 AM
Another bonus.

On the night of February 8/9, 1889, a severe gale in the North Sea took a heavy toll of the fishing fleets of the East Coast of England. A Grimsby Fisherman, William Delf wrote a poem which he had published and sold copies to raise money for the families of the men who had perished. As well as the poem, Delf listed 8 lost vessels, 6 from Grimsby and 2 from Hull which between them would have had a total of between 60 and 70 men on board. The original poem had 8 stanzas and it passed into the oral tradition. An oral version was collected by a master mariner from Filey in East Yorkshire in 1957. This had lost 6 of the original 8 verses but had acquired a new verse which contained an error in the date (October instead of February) and it had also acquired a tune. The song has subsequently, with some futher small variations, become well known in folk-song clubs in England as well as being popular with Fishermen's choirs on the East Coast of England.

I have heard it sung many times in local folk clubs and here is my version


http://youtu.be/EGf7vd4lK4g

Words & Chords

Three Score and Ten
Traditional

Me [C] thinks I see a host of craft,
[F] Spreading their sails a-[C]lee
As [F] down the Humber [C] they do glide,
All bound for the [F] northern [G7] Sea
Me [C] thinks I see on each small craft
A crew with [F] hearts so [C] brave
Setting out to [F] earn their [G7] daily bread
[F] Upon the [G7] restless [C] waves.

Chorus:
And it's [C] three score and ten
Boys and men were [F] lost from Grimsby [C] Town
From [F] Yarmouth down to [C] Scarborough
Many hundreds [F] more were [G7] drowned
Their [C] herring craft and trawlers
Their fishing [F] smacks as [C] well
Alone they [F] fight the [G7] bitter night
And [F] battle [G7] with the [C] swell.

Me thinks I see them yet again,
As they leave this land behind
Casting their nets into the sea,
The herring shoals to find
Me thinks I see them yet again,
And all on board's a right
With their sails close-reefed, their decks cleared up
And their side-lights burning bright.
Chorus

October's night brought such a sight,
'Twas never seen before
There were masts and yards and broken spars,
Washed up upon the shore
There was many a heart of sorrow,
There was many a heart so brave
There was many a hearty fisher lad
Did find a watery grave.
Chorus

I actually used a D-tuned uke

J-Peg
07-20-2013, 05:32 AM
John D Loudermilk wrote good songs IMHO.
Lament Of a Cherokee Nation (Indian Reservation)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EYxdn8q57w (youtube;7EYxdn8q57w)
Would have liked to have done this a lot slower.
Check out his original on YouTube - I think its brill.

Thank you for this, pa. Like a lot of people from the southern Appalachia, my wife and I have some Cherokee blood (her much more so than I.) This song has always moved me, and your version is no exception.

decaturcomp
07-20-2013, 08:34 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSN_ouZ9bqM&amp;feature=c4-overview&amp;list=UUa57R-HT-UlbHxQ0i2hy7yw

uke4ia
07-20-2013, 09:42 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiubM7AirPE

200 years ago, in Newfoundland....

This is an original song called "Mary March and Nancy April". I couldn't get this one finished for Myrna's Canada week in Season 72, so I'm glad that alemarco chose this theme. This is the story of Demasduit.

In 1819, the Beothuk Indians were dwindling, due to disease and being pushed back by colonists from the good coastal fishing grounds to the interior, where food was harder to find. The governor of Newfoundland offered a reward for someone to act as a go-between for the Beothuks and colonists. This was the perfect excuse for John Peyton, Sr., who wanted revenge for the Indians' theft the previous year of fishing traps and other equipment. He led a party of furriers, which tracked a band of Beothuks down in the interior. The Indians ran, and they caught a young woman named Demasduit who was slowed down carrying her infant. Her husband was the group's leader, Nonosabawsut. She handed her baby off to him just before she was caught, and he brought the baby to another tribeswoman. But when he tried to rescue Demasduit he was shot and killed. The baby died a few days later.

Demasduit was brought to the coastal town of Twillingate, where they dubbed her Mary March for the month of her capture. She was brought by ship to the capital of St. John's. When people learned she'd been separated from her baby, there was a popular demand to have her returned to her tribe. The governor found that Demasduit was in the early stages of tuberculosis, and felt that the goodwill gesture of having a liaison with the Indians would be lost if her return waited until she was dying. So she was returned to Twillingate, but her health deteriorated over the course of that year, and she died before she could be reunited with her people.

By late winter of 1823, there were less than 20 remaining Beothuk. A starving Beothuk woman and her two daughters, all with tuberculosis, were caught foraging for food near a colonial town. Two of them soon died, but one of the daughters recovered. Her name was Shanawdithit. She was Demasduit's niece, and had been one of the Beothuks present when Demasduit was captured. The colonists renamed her Nancy April. She lived as a servant in John Peyton, Jr.'s house for five years. In 1828, she was brought to St. John's, and died there a year later. She was the last Beothuk ever seen. Most of what is known today about the Beothuks was learned from Shanawdithit when she was in St. John's.

Tootler
07-20-2013, 10:49 AM
can't stop...entering....here's another..."and the band played waltzing matilda"
http://youtu.be/LuHWzbcoSSU
cheers!!

Great stuff, Dave. The song was actually written by Eric Bogle, an Australian born in Scotland. He has written some great songs. If you liked that one, check out No Mans Land (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1VD84SLW8I) (aka The Green Fields of France or Willie McBride). It was inspired by visits he and his wife made to the war cemeteries in Flanders. I prefer it to The Band Played Waltzing Matilda.

pabrizzer
07-20-2013, 12:15 PM
Thank you for this, pa. Like a lot of people from the southern Appalachia, my wife and I have some Cherokee blood (her much more so than I.) This song has always moved me, and your version is no exception.

I left it til late hoping someone else would do. It has been done as a "pop" song by some but the original by John D Loudermilk is a great song.
I didn't attempt the very effective first nation chant that he used - I thought that would have been a bit over the top being done by an Aussie.

My brother and I and grand daughter Charlotte did another of his songs - This Little Bird.
Just a beautifully constructed little song.
Our version - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oYH00GduK-Q
Loudermilk's original - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJMr2JkSEVM

uke4ia
07-20-2013, 12:46 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4oodKVKx14

Here's a bonus tune. This is "American Roulette" by Robbie Robertson. It's about Jimmy Dean, Elvis, and Marilyn Monroe.

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
07-20-2013, 03:00 PM
I wrote this song in 2003, based on what I was reading in the news. Ten years later, I wish this song was about history. But, sadly, it's still about the news. I added one line to the end of the song to bring it up to date. Lyrics and chords are in the youtube description.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEs2rkk_T4w

I've broken my run of stating the correct Season number at the beginning of my performance with this video, so I added a brief title. I would've gone for another recording, but this one took lots of takes. Heh.

29moons
07-20-2013, 07:15 PM
Here's a bonus tune. This is "American Roulette" by Robbie Robertson. It's about Jimmy Dean, Elvis, and Marilyn Monroe.[/QUOTE]

Uke4ia,
This would have been a good week for a King Tut Reprise.

29moons
07-20-2013, 07:31 PM
Here's my entry this week - Getting ready for some vacation - Gonna play some ukulele in Santa Cruz doing it California style.

"I Saw It On T.V." was off John Fogerty's "Centerfield" album that I absolutely love. It came out in 1985 during my last year of high school so it really resonated. I wasn't a part of most of what he sings about I remember seeing it all on T.V.


http://youtu.be/92kdFVb6Z7g

TCK
07-21-2013, 07:48 AM
July 16th, 1945. The Trinity site, The Manhattan Project, and the "Gadget" made history...in a questionable way.
Then the Louvin Brothers made the strangest gospel song ever about it.
And my wife- well she does not like the Louvin Brothers one bit (she does like other folks singing their songs), but when she suggested we do their song, I was over-joyed. See, I love 'em, even when they got weird.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzkK-LL2k3s

mattydee
07-21-2013, 10:42 AM
Here's my entry. This was one of my favorite songs as a kid. I had no idea it was a true story then.

From Wikipedia:

On March 18, 1965, a 35-year-old truck driver, Eugene P. Seski,[2] was on his way to deliver a load of bananas to Scranton, Pennsylvania. Seski, an employee of Fred Carpentier, who operated a small truck line in Scranton, was returning from the boat piers at Weehawken, New Jersey where he had picked up his load. While the exact information is somewhat lost in time, the load was clearly destined for the "wholesale block" on the western edge of Lackawanna Avenue in Scranton, the local A&P Warehouse or to Halem Hazzouri Bananas, the premier banana purveyor in the area at the time. Seski was driving a 1950s Brockway diesel truck tractor with a 35 ft (11 m) semi-trailer and was headed down Rt. 307 when he suddenly lost control.


http://youtu.be/xVveB8tmatU

decaturcomp
07-21-2013, 11:40 AM
Well...this was KINDA one of the suggestions for this week although maybe not exactly. From an open Mic today where Skidoo was kind enough to man the video cameraphone on short notice. Intro was a long bit where I explained the seasons and encouraged the attendant SEUKERS to join in the unparalleled funnage!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbOHxMNuHBY

UncleMoon
07-21-2013, 12:15 PM
I kind of hesitated to do this song for this season. I try to keep my conversations free from politics and religion. Our son is a US Solider stationed in Afghanistan. We (the US) wouldn't be there but for this incident, I figured the least I could do is show some respect.


http://youtu.be/ho_cD2bQ4eY

Mim
07-21-2013, 05:38 PM
MY FIRST SEASON ENTRY!
Need to figure out some technical difficulties, but have no time now! But, here it is!
Going to so do more of these! Really made me work on a specific song and enjoy some uke time! I play ukes all the time, but in order to listen for buzzes and intonation. Nice to have an excuse to play for me!

THANKS FOR THE CONTEST!!!


http://youtu.be/iRsGCgSFq8U

TCK
07-21-2013, 08:00 PM
MY FIRST SEASON ENTRY!
Need to figure out some technical difficulties, but have no time now! But, here it is!
Going to so do more of these! Really made me work on a specific song and enjoy some uke time! I play ukes all the time, but in order to listen for buzzes and intonation. Nice to have an excuse to play for me!

THANKS FOR THE CONTEST!!!


Sweet baby jesus- did Mim just make her first seasons entry with a Scorpions cover? My god, we are not worthy...way to completely kick ass Mim. So rad my head hurts.

myrnaukelele
07-21-2013, 08:45 PM
We've Got Franklin D. Roosevelt Back Again. 1936.
Lou Nathanson is helping out on guitar.

http://youtu.be/9cZkE-vSll0

myrnaukelele
07-21-2013, 09:12 PM
One last bonus for "It's A Fact" week. There were several other gold mining songs I thought it would be fun to learn for this Season but time got away from me this week. Here's North to Alaska (totally impromptu and with very little practice...)Sorry about the chair blocking out Jimmy (on his homemade uke). I didn't notice it before recording.

http://youtu.be/coc5uYBoQFs

TheUkeBloke
07-22-2013, 12:26 AM
My entry for Season 74. "Captain Cook's Endeavour Song" performed by some unknown author.

Hopefully I just scrapped in before closing time this season.

Its a fact - In April 1770, Endeavour became the first ship to reach the east coast of Australia, when Captain Cook went ashore at what is now known as Botany Bay.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ik8QvYoyyWo

alemarco
07-22-2013, 01:08 AM
And with that our week-long history lesson comes to a close! Thanks everyone for your entries and bonuses. I really enjoyed hosting this season.

Looking forward to re-watching all the entries and bonuses tonight. Hopefully, I'll get some results posted by Tuesday evening.

After a week of seriousness, it's time for some fun, so off to the races for Season 75!

pootsie
07-22-2013, 03:03 AM
I soooooo wanted to post but illness took over last night. Poop! And I practiced a new thing all week, too.
[sad face here]
Perhaps I will record and post as a bonus anyway. Good luck to all who entered on time!

Mim
07-22-2013, 03:06 AM
Sweet baby jesus- did Mim just make her first seasons entry with a Scorpions cover? My god, we are not worthy...way to completely kick ass Mim. So rad my head hurts.

Hells Yeah I did!

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii43/Sarah_Belles90/beavis-butthead.gif

Hahaha! I have always loved this song, but it is a little double special. Once I worked in a mental health facility in collage and there was a blind guy who was basically there just because he was blind and had no one to take care of him. And man, he could play some guitar. I told him I would bring my guitar in and asked him what kind of music he would like me to play. He said, "SCORPIONS!" in this really fervent almost reverently excited voice. So, I would bring my guitar in, and we would play Scorpions, mainly Wind of Change (because it was the song I was most familiar with). I accidentally left my guitar there and he took it with him when he was transferred out. But I was cool with it, because I knew it went with someone who would love it, and I hope somewhere out there he still has that guitar and is rockin' out to some Scorpions to this day!!!

lakesideglenn
07-22-2013, 06:51 AM
I soooooo wanted to post but illness took over last night. Poop! And I practiced a new thing all week, too.
[sad face here]
Perhaps I will record and post as a bonus anyway. Good luck to all who entered on time!

Wow...I also got hit by a GI bug and didnt get my song in. Will try and post tonight as a bonus entry Myrna.

redpaul1
07-22-2013, 06:54 AM
A second late, late, entry in a row. Apologies. Spent too much time researching population statistics(!) and not enough time on songs. If I've missed the deadline, then so be it. But, like greyghost, I was determined not cover some tragedy or other.

I was away at a ukefestival this weekend, with no access to video/internet (old skool!!), but it occurred to me on the way up that virtually every other calypso is on some topic of current affairs. So who better to cover than Lord Kitchener?

I was going to cover 'Victory Calypso' and go for the longest rabbit trail prize, but I couldn't work out the chords in time. I had a bit more luck with this one though:

http://youtu.be/-GwLLFgZOFM

TCK - 54-46??

alemarco
07-22-2013, 04:22 PM
uke4ia - Mary March and Nancy April - The treatment of native peoples by settlers in the Americas is certainly a shameful chapter in history. A wonderful original song, glad you could share it this week!

OnlyUkeThatMatters - Criminal Justice - Great original in a very sobering way. I really like the lines about inalienable rights. Wish this was about history, too, and what's in the news regularly. Wonderful uke playing!

29Moons - I Saw It On TV - I can't believe that I've never heard this song before! A great contribution to this week, and wonderfully performed.

mattydee - 30000 Pounds of Bananas - I would never have thought that this was a really event. I really liked the way you sped up and changed key as the truck speeds up. Great storytelling

Uncle Moon - Angry American - Thanks for this song and for your son's service. Very nice job!

Mim - Wind of Change - Welcome to the Seasons! Please do more, this was amazing! Wonderful song and great job.

TheUkeBloke - Captain Cook's Endeavor - Captain Cook certainly got around the globe, charting large amounts of the Pacific Ocean. Great song and I'm glad you made it this week!

Just rewatched the whole playlist. So much great music!

TCK
07-22-2013, 09:10 PM
That story makes my heart work...so rad. Way to rock us like a hurricane the first time around Mim!
Hells Yeah I did!



Hahaha! I have always loved this song, but it is a little double special. Once I worked in a mental health facility in collage and there was a blind guy who was basically there just because he was blind and had no one to take care of him. And man, he could play some guitar. I told him I would bring my guitar in and asked him what kind of music he would like me to play. He said, "SCORPIONS!" in this really fervent almost reverently excited voice. So, I would bring my guitar in, and we would play Scorpions, mainly Wind of Change (because it was the song I was most familiar with). I accidentally left my guitar there and he took it with him when he was transferred out. But I was cool with it, because I knew it went with someone who would love it, and I hope somewhere out there he still has that guitar and is rockin' out to some Scorpions to this day!!!

TCK
07-22-2013, 09:13 PM
TCK - 54-46??
Would you believe I would take something with me, and give it to the Police man? I wouldn't do that.

chrimess
07-23-2013, 12:17 AM
Carolina Hell Yeah to you, Mim- one of the original judges enters the season as aplayer in '74-that IS history in the making.
-you do know that express appoval from a German is required when playing the Scorps-hereby granted.

Hells Yeah I did!

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii43/Sarah_Belles90/beavis-butthead.gif

Hahaha! I have always loved this song, but it is a little double special. Once I worked in a mental health facility in collage and there was a blind guy who was basically there just because he was blind and had no one to take care of him. And man, he could play some guitar. I told him I would bring my guitar in and asked him what kind of music he would like me to play. He said, "SCORPIONS!" in this really fervent almost reverently excited voice. So, I would bring my guitar in, and we would play Scorpions, mainly Wind of Change (because it was the song I was most familiar with). I accidentally left my guitar there and he took it with him when he was transferred out. But I was cool with it, because I knew it went with someone who would love it, and I hope somewhere out there he still has that guitar and is rockin' out to some Scorpions to this day!!!

alemarco
07-24-2013, 04:17 PM
And finally here are the winners for Season 74!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QaM1m1X9LCY

The condensed version:

Grand Prize - peewee for "Vigilante (zimmer)man"
Longest Rabbit Trail - TCK for "Charlie and the King"
Random Drawing - GaryC1968 for "Juarez, Mexico"

Winners, if you could PM me your addresses that would be great.

Thank you to everyone who participated! See you at the races.

uke4ia
07-24-2013, 04:39 PM
Congratulations, winners! And thanks Alemarco for giving me incentive to get a song finished.

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
07-24-2013, 05:01 PM
Great week, Seasonistas! Thanks, alemarco, for a great challenge! And congratulations to the (very, very) deserving winners. peewee!!!! TCK!!!!! Garyyyy!

chrimess
07-24-2013, 11:55 PM
wne guys, looks like someone is developing a rabbit tail length winning streak!

TCK
07-25-2013, 03:57 AM
Well, I am sittin' in tall cotton here in the 'Dale. Thanks so much for a great week Alemarco, and the opportunity to play one of my favorite songs. I am glad I resisted the urge to employ what is heretofore referred to as the "TCK rule", but boy do I love a rabbit trail, especially one that involves a song. Glad you enjoyed learning about why someone would do a song about a pigeon- we don't often see them as noble here in the US.
Thanks everyone for so much entertainment this week, and every week.

GaryC1968
07-25-2013, 04:16 AM
I WON, I WON, I WON!!! (the random drawing)

Thank you alemarco for a fun and educational season! Great job to everyone who entered!
Congratulations to peewee for a very moving performance and to The Birdman from Cloverdale for another amazing bird song.

peewee
07-25-2013, 05:36 AM
What The...
Wow. No way, I am honored, thank you Alemarco! And congrats to TCK and Gary and all this week's factual singers. I was never one to get into fantasy, reality is so much weirder, so I really dug the stories this week. Too crazy can't believe it, thank you thank you thank you.

decaturcomp
10-04-2017, 05:08 PM
Well, this season is long since over but a song I recorded for it got picked up by The Bob Dylan Projec (http://thebobdylanproject.com/Artist/id/3981/Alan-Thornton)t. It seems that there are only 3 versions of this song around, a rare one by Dylan, one that was done by the guy I learned it from, and mine. Just a fun thing that happened as the result of SOTU and UU and yoU folks:

If you follow the link Above there's a page with just my name and you click select all.

Or, here's the video from this very season.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&amp;v=roUHtrg8GEo

~dave~~wave~
10-05-2017, 11:23 AM
^ ^ ^

Very cool, Alan. Congratulations and thanks for the update.

Barbablanca
10-11-2017, 11:23 PM
Cool! Very Cool! Super cool! (apparently a simple message of "cool" is too short for the UU programme to accept ;) )

redpaul1
10-16-2017, 12:16 AM
Well done, Alan! What a great compliment - And good to hear the tune again!!

lelouden
10-17-2017, 02:40 PM
Thats fantastic Alan! This season was before my time so I'm thrilled to hear it for the first time. Thats quite the honor!

Tootler
10-18-2017, 08:20 PM
Quite a compliment,Alan. Well done

BigDaddyUker
10-20-2017, 12:13 PM
Big King Velour and Pa are on that list as well.

pabrizzer
10-20-2017, 01:03 PM
Big King Velour and Pa are on that list as well.
Ha. Who knew? Thanks BDU.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z95ENNZKLUQ

Money Blues which i did for season 123 as a shout out to Librainian.
That's the seasons for ya...

And BKV is there for Sugar Baby which also featured Alan!


Got thousands of views for the one I did for this season though.
A song I thought about quite a bit before covering. Tough song.
Strange Fruit (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vj_GceM7vsg)

pabrizzer
10-20-2017, 01:11 PM
BTW this goes to show that once you post a video online they really do a have a life of their own.
So if you get thumbs downs (like I often do) blame the world and not fellow seasonistas.

lelouden
10-21-2017, 01:17 PM
Just noticed that I too have a song on the list.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o24enCVJcDk

decaturcomp
10-22-2017, 11:02 AM
Hey, this is FUN!