PDA

View Full Version : Electric ukulele. Why?



Fermin
08-20-2013, 02:04 PM
Ok, Iīll try to make this sound as not judgmental as possible (because Iīm not, but I realize some people have strong feelings about electric ukes and some of the things I will say can be taken and said in different ways).

I play acoustic ukulele and some acoustic guitar. I understand them as very different instruments, regardless of having some similarities. I get what the reentrant tuning, limited range and four strings offer. I also play some electric guitar (or used to, I had to seel it, but will buy another one soon), which I understand as completely different from an acoustic guitar.

Now, I have a mild case of UAS, and I may at some point be tempted to buy an electric ukulele (they look so cute, specially the LPs!), but with my income I have to be realistic about the benefit it would be for me.

The thing is that I donīt see an electric uke as something substantially different from an electric guitar, and I would like to hear from you and see if Iīm right or wrong in my view, and if I would regret allowing myself to be tempted into buying an electric uke.

I understand why some people who only play the ukulele would want the sound of an electric guitar without having to learn to play the guitar. Thatīs very respectable, but itīs not important for me, as I play the guitar as good (or as bad) as I play the ukulele.

I also understand they can be good for silent practice, but that is not a concern for me.

If portability is the concern (which is not mine nowadays, but that may change), Iīm not entirely sure if a travel guitar wouldnīt do the job at least as good. But anyways, portability is not a concern for me right now.

So that leaves us with music, and that is mostly why (ignoring the aforementioned aspects) Iīm not sure of what the point of an electric ukulele would be for me. Iīve watched a lot of videos of people playing them, and none of them did anything different than what they could have done with an electric guitar. If that is really it, I will just get a new electric guitar when I have the chance (and some other acoustic ukes, maybe a banjolele).

Of course people uploading videos on youtube are only a fraction of the electric ukulele players universe.

Do you know (or better yet, are you) anyone who plays their electric ukulele in a way that it doesnīt sound like either an acoustic uke or an electric guitar?

What can be done with electric ukuleles that would make them irreplaceable?

Please donīt hate me, I tried to word this this as objectively as possible and clearly referring to my personal priorities.

ukemunga
08-20-2013, 02:22 PM
Here's my simple take on it. Two reasons.

For fun. Because it is.
For volume when performing.

I don't "perform." But I've got and Epi LP and a little 15W plug-in-only acoustic amp and it's just fun. And you can play very softly with much nuance (yea, like I can do that) and still hear it.

Uke and amp = about $150 - $175. UAS fun.

Wicked
08-20-2013, 03:23 PM
This horse has been beaten repeatedly on this forum... But in response to your questions, I play my steel string, electric ukulele every day. When I play, it sounds nothing like when I play either acoustic ukulele OR electric guitar. As far as I'm concerned, ukuleles (of all types) are just tools with which we make music... and my electric ukulele is a great tool for me.

I don't have an electric ukulele to take the place of an electric guitar. I have a couple of those - and quite frankly, I can play the hell out of them. I have an electric ukulele to sound like an electric ukulele.

I came close to playing a couple of numbers with my Kamoa Evolve at an international jazz festival (with a huge name in Jazz) earlier this year, but my real job got in the way... so that pretty much legitimizes my tool selection, in my book...... not that I really need any validation.

PhilUSAFRet
08-20-2013, 04:30 PM
How about "Why Not?" A fine hollow bodied uke, with a fine pickup, and a fine "acoustic" amplifier does not sound like an electric guitar, any more than a fine acoustic guitar with those qualifications sounds like an electric guitar. Lots of valid reasons, including "I want my uke to sound like an electric guitar." Whatever floats your boat...........as long as you are having fun and enjoying the music you are making.

allanr
08-20-2013, 04:42 PM
Nobody should own an electric ukulele. Anyone that does is wrong. It is a well known fact that people that own and play electric ukuleles mistreat their dogs.

Fermin
08-20-2013, 04:48 PM
This horse has been beaten repeatedly on this forum... But in response to your questions, I play my steel string, electric ukulele every day. When I play, it sounds nothing like when I play either acoustic ukulele OR electric guitar. As far as I'm concerned, ukuleles (of all types) are just tools with which we make music... and my electric ukulele is a great tool for me.

I don't have an electric ukulele to take the place of an electric guitar. I have a couple of those - and quite frankly, I can play the hell out of them. I have an electric ukulele to sound like an electric ukulele.

I came close to playing a couple of numbers with my Kamoa Evolve at an international jazz festival (with a huge name in Jazz) earlier this year, but my real job got in the way... so that pretty much legitimizes my tool selection, in my book...... not that I really need any validation.

Of course you donīt need validation. Iīm just looking to hear from people with different views, and hopefully also find some electric ukulele players that do something I find interesting and educational. Where can I listen to you playing your electric uke?


How about "Why Not?" A fine hollow bodied uke, with a fine pickup, and a fine "acoustic" amplifier does not sound like an electric guitar, any more than a fine acoustic guitar with those qualifications sounds like an electric guitar. Lots of valid reasons, including "I want my uke to sound like an electric guitar." Whatever floats your boat...........as long as you are having fun and enjoying the music you are making.

I should probably have been clearer in that I was referring to steel string electric ukuleles. While "I want my uke to sound like an electric guitar" seems to be a very common reason, itīs not one that would work for me. As Iīve said, Iīm more interested in it not sounding like an electric guitar, and I havenīt seen a lot of that (I probably should mention that electric ukuleles are not sold where I live, so Iīm only judging by what I have been able to find on youtube).

Fermin
08-20-2013, 04:54 PM
Nobody should own an electric ukulele. Anyone that does is wrong. It is a well known fact that people that own and play electric ukuleles mistreat their dogs.


Erm... I donīt know if thatīs because of me or because of other people critizicing electric ukuleles. Iīm not implying anything like that, so please donīt go there, Iīm asking a honest question about a certain aspects of electric ukuleles.

itsme
08-20-2013, 06:00 PM
I'd say it boils down to whether or not you actually NEED amplification. Most of us don't.

Jim Hanks
08-20-2013, 06:07 PM
Nobody should own an electric ukulele. Anyone that does is wrong. It is a well known fact that people that own and play electric ukuleles mistreat their dogs.
:troll:

Pretty sure that was intended as a joke Fermin.

But since you clarified about steel string electric, I have to say I mostly agree with you that that has little appeal to me even though I have two nylon string acoustic ukes with pickups and another in the pipeline. To me, the only advantage of that format would be the shorter scale of the uke and tuning like a "normal" uke.

imagesinthewind
08-20-2013, 06:21 PM
i own two concert acou/elec ukes. the reason i bought them was to try out uke and reverb. i recently tuned in to my husbands love of surf music and thought we might be able to come up with some surf-y duets, but unless i'm plugged in, too, i can be heard over his jazzmaster. so having the ability to also plug in gives me more utlilty with the uke.

thats why. and they sound like louder ukes, not electic guitars.

The Big Kahuna
08-20-2013, 07:27 PM
I want an electric Uke purely for the fact that I used to be what my wife described as a "widdly widdly" guitarist...Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Gary Moore, Jeff Beck type stuff...and I'd like a Uke that I can shred on. I have Guitar Rig 5 and Overloud TH2 on my PC, and when the mood takes me and I feel like making my neighbours' ears bleed, I'd like a Uke I can do it on, instead of picking up my Patrick Eggle Berlin Pro.

I'm determined to have one built with a locking trem on it though (Kahler make bass trems, which I reckon will work). In the meantime, I'm after either an Epiphone Mandobird 4 or a Risa Tenor Les Paul.

PhilUSAFRet
08-21-2013, 12:57 AM
I have a Risa semi-hollow bodied tenor with twin lipsticks. I tried to learn guitar and failed, so now, if I want to play "electric guitar", I have a little, red, 4 stringed one that sounds like a big one. Makes perfect sense. Popular Pop song a few years back, "whatever maaaaaaaaaaakes you happy? A uke is just a small, 4 stringed instrument capable of much more than it's original developers intended. Some people look at an electric uke and say why? I say why not? (although I must admit I don't play it often)

Wicked
08-21-2013, 01:15 AM
Of course you donīt need validation. Iīm just looking to hear from people with different views, and hopefully also find some electric ukulele players that do something I find interesting and educational. Where can I listen to you playing your electric?

Fermin, I just re-read my response, and believe I owe you an apology for my tone. I did not intend to come across so snidely. You were asking legitimate questions, and my response reads like some kind of challenge.

Unfortunately, I don't post anything online - so I cannot point you to an example of my playing.

Jon Moody
08-21-2013, 01:58 AM
An electric uke (and NOT an acoustic uke with a pickup) will be a different thing. For myself, I have a slew of effect pedals that play nicer with a solid bodied electric uke over an acoustic with a pickup (and trust me, I've tried!).

So it goes back to the OP's comparison between an acoustic guitar and an electric guitar. Both are tuned the same and in the same family, but they both serve different roles and give different timbres and tones. It all comes down to what sounds you want to make.

Fermin
08-21-2013, 03:04 AM
Fermin, I just re-read my response, and believe I owe you an apology for my tone. I did not intend to come across so snidely. You were asking legitimate questions, and my response reads like some kind of challenge.

Unfortunately, I don't post anything online - so I cannot point you to an example of my playing.

No apology needed, I didnīt take it that way. The communication experience over a text only medium is very limited.

Can you point me to an example of someone else playing an electric uke not like an electric guitar? My efforts so far to find that have failed.



An electric uke (and NOT an acoustic uke with a pickup) will be a different thing. For myself, I have a slew of effect pedals that play nicer with a solid bodied electric uke over an acoustic with a pickup (and trust me, I've tried!).

So it goes back to the OP's comparison between an acoustic guitar and an electric guitar. Both are tuned the same and in the same family, but they both serve different roles and give different timbres and tones. It all comes down to what sounds you want to make.

Well, my intention wasnīt really to make a statement, or to compare an electric uke to an acoustic one, but to compare it to an electric guitar and challenge my current limited perception of that comparison.

kissing
08-21-2013, 03:13 AM
I really don't see what all the fuss is about.

It's actually quite simple.
Having an electric instrument with the playability of an ukulele opens up endless new possibilities with the instrument.
Why shouldn't it exist *shrugs*

I think too many people assume that just because an electric guitar and electric ukulele are both "electric", that they would sound and feel the same.

To me, this assumption is as big as saying "what's the point of a ukulele when you can just play classical guitar". The tuning, scale length, neck profile, instrument size, pickups, etc make all the difference.

Tootler
08-21-2013, 04:33 AM
Here's my simple take on it.
For fun. Because it is...

:agree:

I have a Risa "stick" so still a nylon string instrument and with a piezo pickup rather than a magnetic one. However, it is definitely a different instrument from a plugged in acoustic and it opens a range of different possibilities, particularly the use of effects which is just not the same with an acoustic uke fitted with a pickup.

True that these are effects that were developed for electric guitar but an electric uke still sounds different; even something like a Risa LP (steel strings with twin humbucker pickups). The ukulele lacks bass (even with low G, the lowest note is G below middle C) and the shorter strings mean less natural sustain - again even with steel strings. These guys (http://youtu.be/ubND8GxNeeE) do a fantastic job on Sultans of Swing even to playing Mark Knopfler's solos on a solid Risa (predecessor to their current LP range) but they still don't sound like a guitars. Notice particularly no real bass on the lead instrument and less sustain. Also a slightly "thinner" sound - and that's not meant as a criticism.

So you treat your electric uke as what it is, an electric uke not a pale imitation of an electric guitar. For all that you can still have fun by using effects units designed for electric guitar, so you can experiment with distortion/overdrive sounds, chorus, delay etc, etc and they work.

Here are a couple of my efforts

Lucille: (http://youtu.be/aeFmkNYY7cI) Alternates between an overdrive sound for solos and a "clean" sound for accompaniment.

I Can't Get Used to Losing You (http://youtu.be/hb71ccagqr4): Uses a chorused sound on the uke.

For both of these I used a Vox Stomplab IG effects unit.

In the first case, I plugged the Risa directly into my mixer and recorded the mixer output, together with vocals using an Edirol R09 digital recorder

In the second case, I played the uke through a Vox AC1 micro amp and recorded directly using the Edirol's built in mics. (It was actually the bass version of the AC1 which I bought for my U-Bass but it does a pretty good job with the Risa and played directly, you can get quite a good "acoustic" tone with suitable adjustment of the controls)

In both cases I then edited the recordings using Audacity.

In neither case, do I sound like an electric guitar, though the first probably comes closer.

DaveY
08-21-2013, 06:27 AM
In the meantime, I'm after either an Epiphone Mandobird 4 or a Risa Tenor Les Paul.

There's a Mandobird 4 for sale ($180 plus shipping) at https://www.fleamarketmusic.com/marketplace/default.asp -- don't know if being out of the U.S. will make the shipping too much.

(Oh, and here, too: "http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?84786-FS-Classic-Epiphone-Electric-Mandobird-IV" )

pootsie
08-21-2013, 08:05 AM
Because I only have four fingers on my fretting hand and I want to be Johnny Marr ;)

Shastastan
08-21-2013, 11:14 AM
Well, I confess to wondering why anyone would want to amp their uke except for a stage performance. So, I just bought a les paul epiphone a couple of weeks ago. "How could I do such a thing?" I love the sound of acoustics-both guitar and uke. I tried guitar and I didn't like the steel strings and also I couldn't get my fingers to comply with my mind. Being an old guy, I at least had a chance with a uke. Hmmmmm, why would I want an electric uke when I don't like metal, heavy rock, etc.. Well, I like some of the old stuff like "Apache", "Johnny Be Good", etc.. I already knew what effects are from playing with my sound software and I heard V30's sound samples and that sold me. Realistically, it's just a toy for me. Heck, the multi-effects processor cost more than the uke! I am going to try and see what kind of a bass sound I can get out of it to possibly play something with our uke group. I might sell the stuff later on, but for now, I'm having fun. YMMV

The Big Kahuna
08-21-2013, 11:38 AM
Even if none of you like metal or technical rock guitar, or anything like that, how about playing a bit of Link Wray on a Uke ? Come on! Rumble! Think about it!

Tootler
08-21-2013, 11:50 AM
50s rock n Roll - Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Carl Perkins, Early Elvis, etc. etc. works pretty well on electric uke. Add plenty of echo/delay. Overdrive is good too, though it really belongs more to a later period. However, the valve amps of the 50s must have been overdriven in search of more volume.

Wicked
08-21-2013, 12:58 PM
[QUOTE=The Big Kahuna;1361941]Even if none of you like metal or technical rock guitar, or anything like that, how about playing a bit of Link Wray on a Uke ? Come on! Rumble! Think about it![/QUOT

Link Wray. Yes.

allanr
08-21-2013, 12:58 PM
:troll:

Pretty sure that was intended as a joke Fermin.

But since you clarified about steel string electric, I have to say I mostly agree with you that that has little appeal to me even though I have two nylon string acoustic ukes with pickups and another in the pipeline. To me, the only advantage of that format would be the shorter scale of the uke and tuning like a "normal" uke.

It was a joke... With a serious purpose.

I dislike posts that start with the premise that something or another requires justification in some way. There is an implication that people who own or like the object in question lack good judgement. It is a mean-spirited way to approach a subject. The poster is basically saying, "I have judged your decision to buy an electric ukulele to be stupid, but I am willing to give you the opportunity to argue otherwise."

Get it?

Wicked
08-21-2013, 04:15 PM
I'm actually in the final design stages of a semihollow hybrid ukulele (magnetic and piezo pickups). In theory, I could rig that as a ukulele synthesizer.... but that may be a little too far off the rails for me, at this point.

....maybe the next one.

Fermin
08-21-2013, 04:39 PM
It was a joke... With a serious purpose.

I dislike posts that start with the premise that something or another requires justification in some way. There is an implication that people who own or like the object in question lack good judgement. It is a mean-spirited way to approach a subject. The poster is basically saying, "I have judged your decision to buy an electric ukulele to be stupid, but I am willing to give you the opportunity to argue otherwise."

Get it?

Did you even bother to read my whole post?

We all have different reasons to do things. I whish I could buy every uke out there, but I canīt afford it. I canīt afford a fraction of what some people in this forum can, so I have to think if it will be worth for me, not buy it just because I think it looks adorable (which I do, and is why I have opened this thread). I.E: I already have a spruce top soprano, so Iīm not likely going to get another one anytime soon.

I believe I have said very clearly that while understand the arguments a lot of people have to decide to buy an electric ukulele, those reasons (the ones most often cited, over and over again), are not important to me. Read that again: TO ME, not anyone else, just me in my very personal situation. And Iīm looking to see if there are other reasons that would make me buy it. I believe I have said that very clearly too, strictly musical reasons that allow it to do stuff that canīt be done with an electric guitar. Thatīs all Iīm asking about, the musical aspect of it.

Iīm only asking to know if itīs something I should consider buying, not if anyone else was right or wrong in buying theirs.

I didnīt call anyone stupid. If you canīt help taking discussing different priorities as something personal, youīre the only one calling someone stupid, and it isnīt me.

My apologies to the mods and the rest of the posters that answered in good heart. I wonīt reply again to people who pass judgement without bothering to read and understand what was said. I will reply to other posts later, or tomorrow. This left me quite upset.

The Big Kahuna
08-21-2013, 06:50 PM
We have to draw a line somewhere, in my opinion.

The Electric Banjo, for example, is a barbaric method of execution.

chefy
08-21-2013, 07:00 PM
I got a Mahalo surf e-uke plugged into a VOX Dynamic Looper and the fun I have at times is beyond epic! (My wife and the neighbors would surely disagree with my statement.)

I believe the only limitation in Music is yourself - the most important part is that you love and enjoy it - the rest and the others don't matter.

kerley
08-22-2013, 01:57 AM
We have to draw a line somewhere, in my opinion.

The Electric Banjo, for example, is a barbaric method of execution.

Only yesterday I came across an electric Accordian from Roland on Youtube which I thought seemed a mad idea. The player/reviewer loved it though.

Why do I now want an electric uke when I had no interest in one before this thread....

allanr
08-22-2013, 02:32 AM
For those interested in acquiring steel string electrics, there are some interesting options available, not all if them obvious at first.

I bought an Epiphone Madobird IV, which was actually manufactured as a four string electric mandolin. But with heavier treble strings, retuning, and some serious (but simple) intonation adjustments of the saddles, it has become a really cool electric ukulele. It does not sound all that traditional ukulele-like but it is great for a uke player looking to seriously expand the sonic possibilities of the uke, it is a whole heap of fun!

There are also the instruments by Jupitet Creek in Australia. They look cool but I've never had the opportunity to try one.

Another interesting option is to buy/try a tenor guitar. They can easily be tuned the same as a baritone ukulele. It could be argued that a four string guitar isn't a ukulele, but again... It is an easy and fun way for a ukulele player to instantly expand her playing possibilities. I've seen some interesting looking tenor guitars on eBay from a company called Soares.

There are also baritone and soprano steel string electrics from Konablaster. There may still be a used one on Fleamarketmusic, and last time I checked, Elderly Instruments was carrying them.

Anyone with a case of the UAS should consider one of these guys!

BTW. My Mandobird is currently for sale on the Market page. I've replaced it in my stable with a Godin. The Godin is not steel string, but it is very versatile.

Shastastan
08-22-2013, 08:35 AM
Only yesterday I came across an electric Accordian from Roland on Youtube which I thought seemed a mad idea. The player/reviewer loved it though.

Why do I now want an electric uke when I had no interest in one before this thread....

Because, like me, a thread made you curious. Except for my first uke, all of my other uke acquisitions were caused by threads on this forum. I have to say this or I would have to accept responsibility for my actions. :).

SparkyD
08-23-2013, 09:09 PM
Hi Fermin,
I hope you’re still reading this thread, because I think you asked a legitimate question. And I'm someone who loves her new Teton solid-body electric tenor and Kala acoustic travel tenor with equal enthusiasm. (I don't play the guitar and don't want to, any more than I want to play the violin or trombone, although I love both instruments.)

It seemed to me that you went out of your way in your original post to show that you are neither anti- nor pro-electric ukulele. (And that you were only talking about yourself, not judging others. You used the phrase “for me” numerous times, as well as other careful wording to make this crystal clear.) I got the definite impression that you are very willing to be convinced that there's an electric ukulele out there with your name on it. But why spend the necessary dollars to get a quality instrument if it can't give you anything different or better than what you already have?

I wholeheartedly agree with an earlier comment that it mostly depends what sound(s) you want to make, as a solid-body electric ukulele, especially in conjunction with various iPad apps, is capable of a wide spectrum. However, you're right that audio and video clips online of anything other than electric guitar emulation and amplified acoustic sound is pretty much non-existent. I can guess at all kinds of reasons for this, but one of them might be that electric ukes are new enough and evolving so fast that nobody’s fully explored and demonstrated all the possibilities.

The only way you can ever really know if an electric ukulele is right for you would be by actually playing a high-end model like a Ko'olau CE2 or Kamoa Evolve, connected to an iPad (or maybe a Mac or PC) with an audio interface such as an iRig HD, and experimenting with all that this setup is capable of.

All that being said, I suspect that there is not yet anything unique enough about the current crop of electrics that would make buying one worth it to you. And by “unique” I mean allowing you to achieve something something essentially different than you already have with your current instruments. As you play the guitar already, this may be all you need in the electrified realm. But do see if you can somehow try out one or more solid-body (or semi-hollow) electric ukuleles, and keep an eye on the market, as new-and-improved ones keep popping up, produced by larger companies and individual artisans alike.

FYI, some of the current brands you might check out are (in no particular order, other than my beloved Teton at the top, and a mix of nylon- and steel-stringed):
-Teton
-Risa
-Pono TE (to be released in October)
-Godin
-Kamoa Evolve
-Ko'olau CE2 (and the earlier CE1)
-Mann
-Stagg
-Harley Benton (UK)
-Vintage (UK)
-Sojing
-Elekstick
-Epiphone
-YongChun / East-Start (E&S)

I haven’t included Eleuke, because of their quality-control issues. Such issues might also apply to any of the above, but I don’t know about that.

By the way, if anyone reading this knows of other brands of quality solid-body electric ukes, please post them here, as I'd love to find out (and buy, darn you, EUAS!) more.

I learned a lot from the many positive responses in this thread, and I hope they were also of help to you, Fermin, even if only to convince you to delay your electric ukulele purchase until you win the lottery and decide to buy one of everything.

Please don’t be discouraged. Keep playing and posting, and keep an eye out for more developments (and more videos!) with electric ukes, which will hopefully be reported here first!

Icelander53
02-06-2015, 09:33 AM
I got a Mahalo surf e-uke plugged into a VOX Dynamic Looper and the fun I have at times is beyond epic! (My wife and the neighbors would surely disagree with my statement.)

I believe the only limitation in Music is yourself - the most important part is that you love and enjoy it - the rest and the others don't matter.



I have that e-uke and it's inspired me to get a tenor solid/chambered electric. They have a surprisingly good sound which I easily prefer to the Gibson. Do you have the steel string or nylon version? If you are a child of the 60s-70s you likely understand why I must have one. With a little amp and some effects you can just have fun pretending you're a rock god.

Papa Tom
02-06-2015, 04:04 PM
I used to feel the same way about electric ukes (I don't own one or aspire to own one), but then I saw the cool things guys like James Hill do with it and now I can understand why some uke players go in that direction.

When I was drumming, there were certain licks that sounded phenomenal over a beefed up sound system in a huge concert hall, but when the faders came down and it was just the sticks hitting the drums, the magic went right out the window. Some effects can only be achieved when you have the ability to exaggerate certain aspects of your sound. With an acoustic uke, you're limited to what you can do with placement against your body, muting with your shirt sleeve, etc. Amplifying the instrument opens many other doors.

Still, I prefer the basic sound of the strings and soundboard resonating in the breeze...

CeeJay
02-06-2015, 04:41 PM
Electric ukulele.

Why?

Why Not?:music:

Cfiimei
02-06-2015, 05:36 PM
I built this one before they were widely available. Used the basic outline of the Flea because I thought it would look like a nice paddle in solid wood. Imbuia and figured maple with an under saddle pickup. This is my only electric build. Sounds nice but quiet unplugged... I practice withit a lot.

http://youtu.be/lhGu8JKcj9k

bnolsen
02-06-2015, 05:50 PM
smaller size, bigger string spacing.

bnolsen
02-06-2015, 06:19 PM
Only yesterday I came across an electric Accordian from Roland on Youtube which I thought seemed a mad idea. The player/reviewer loved it though.

Why do I now want an electric uke when I had no interest in one before this thread....

you just need to check out those vorson electic ukes. I used to think I wanted the strat model but now I want a les paul to go along with my gretsch junior jet. Or maybe not...steel strings can do some ugly things to your fingers.

wayward
02-06-2015, 11:07 PM
I totally get the OP's points on wanting a ukulele to sound like a uke and not a guitar (electric or otherwise). When I bought my acoustic baritone I opted for it because it didn't sound like a guitar (tenor or otherwise) even though it's tuned DGBE. When I had that baritone fitted with a soundboard transducer (pickup) & put it through my Roland AC33 it took me hours to get the transducers positioned correctly and the amp settings sorted, so that the sound had the same qualities through the amp as it did acoustically - and at one point I did almost give in and opt for an electric ukulele. Previously our lead ukulele player also almost got so frustrated with the intermittent feedback issues he was having (particularly when using an effects pedal) at our gigs that he tried a couple of electric tenors: but, although they got close, they didn't have the same tone as the acoustic ukuleles: as he already tends to play the ukulele in a similar style to some guitar players that wasn't what we wanted. Finally he "discovered" the Roland Cube 80, which gives him the volume we need, and has effects which allow him to be more versatile. There's one setting in particular which gives a distorted guitar sound when the ukulele is strummed or picked heavily, but which allows it to sound like an acoustic ukulele when played more gently - I think you can just about hear it in this recording: https://soundcloud.com/emptyfrets/copperhead-road-cover. Anyway, the struggles we had to get this sound live make me understand why people often opt for electric ukuleles :rolleyes: