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Dwave
10-05-2013, 11:39 AM
:mad:

This uke is new! Within the last 7-8 days I have had this name brand Hawaiian solid mahogany ukulele from a well known dealer. 4 splits have appeared in the wood today and this thing is falling apart. I do not want to mention the brand but is well known as well as the dealer. Canít reach them today as they are closed, but I have reviewed there return policy and it is very limited.

Any thoughts?

cigarfan
10-05-2013, 11:47 AM
Certainly follow up with the dealer soon as you can. Sounds like you may have a humidification problem. I would get a humidifier in the case with the uke right away. A damp sponge in a ziplock bag with some holes in it would work too. Best of luck with it.

perep
10-05-2013, 11:48 AM
Wait till mOnday, usually the good dealers DO NOT want negative reviews of their wares. Good luck. If you do not get satisfaction I would be interested in knowing what part of the country you live, (climate) & the name of dealer

Dwave
10-05-2013, 12:11 PM
Certainly follow up with the dealer soon as you can. Sounds like you may have a humidification problem. I would get a humidifier in the case with the uke right away. A damp sponge in a ziplock bag with some holes in it would work too. Best of luck with it.

I have a Kamaka tenor and an Ohana tenor in the same room and I looked them over real close because that was my first thought but they are fine. If this would have happened to my Kamaka I think I would have jumped out the window.

ralphk
10-05-2013, 01:15 PM
I don't know about your particular situation and where you are living, but a humidity problem at this time of the year seems very unlikely.

I have had two tenor mahogany ukes crack, one clearly not a humidity problem and one where humidity might, might, have been a problem. Both were built in very high humidity areas of the world. I have had three other mahogany ukes w/o any problems and all are lightly built.

My guess, not a problem at your end.

Dwave
10-05-2013, 02:55 PM
Unusual for only having it a week and having so many cracks. Played it this morning around 10 am no issues; at 2 in the afternoon went to play it and discovered the cracks/splits. 4 so far in total, two on the top at the butt under bridge that follow the grain lines, two on the back and on at least 10 inches long. It is very lightly made compared to others I have owned. I really liked it real Hawaiian traditional sound and simple very vintage looking. Hope I can get this resolved with the dealer.

PhilUSAFRet
10-05-2013, 03:33 PM
Anxiously waiting to find out the brand of the " name brand Hawaiian solid mahogany ukulele "

Dwave
10-05-2013, 04:54 PM
Yeah, I can't believe it. I have owned other lesser mahogany ukes and this never happened with them. I understand that cracks and splits can happen but this happened so quickly and so extensive. I just want it resolved fairly.

Doc_J
10-05-2013, 05:34 PM
Yeah, I can't believe it. I have owned other lesser mahogany ukes and this never happened with them. I understand that cracks and splits can happen but this happened so quickly and so extensive. I just want it resolved fairly.

I have never heard of a new uke self-destruct like yours. Wow! In only a week too. I'm assuming it wasn't made in Hawaii.

Dan Uke
10-05-2013, 05:49 PM
I remember you living in Socal, somewhere in San Diego as you were looking for a luthier. It's been windy the last couple of days so very dry. For instance, I'm checking out San Diego and it's 5% humidity right now and 26% in Cerritos, where I live. There has been a red flag warning since Friday in San Diego as it will be 5 - 15% humidity most of the day and only rising up to 25% some hours in the night. That's horrible for any wooden instrument.

I think if you haven't kept it in your case with a humidifier, that could be the reason. When you say in the same room, that doesn't sound like it's been in the case but I could be over reading your comment.

Dwave
10-05-2013, 07:27 PM
All have been cased and I checked them all out this is the only one with any issues. We have had many Santa Ana type red flag days this year and I don't have humidifiers for my Kamaka, Ohana, two guitars all the other ukes I've owned and no issues. Anyway, I would agree that it is dry and that most likely is the culprit but there is more to it than that. There are 6 splits now, one at least 7 inches and now the center back seem appears to be spliting.

Yes this uke was built in Hawaii.

PhilUSAFRet
10-06-2013, 03:10 AM
Maybe the West Coast uke shop didn't store it properly. Could be a combination of factors. Sounds like you have a new uke coming to you

Skinny Money McGee
10-06-2013, 04:06 AM
Since your not giving out any information, kinda of hard to give you any "thoughts"...

HBolte
10-06-2013, 04:10 AM
Is it possible that your other ukes have acclimated to the dry weather slowly and that the new one cracked because it came from very high humidity to very low humidity suddenly?

Doc_J
10-06-2013, 04:47 AM
I remember you living in Socal, somewhere in San Diego as you were looking for a luthier. It's been windy the last couple of days so very dry. For instance, I'm checking out San Diego and it's 5% humidity right now and 26% in Cerritos, where I live. There has been a red flag warning since Friday in San Diego as it will be 5 - 15% humidity most of the day and only rising up to 25% some hours in the night. That's horrible for any wooden instrument.

I think if you haven't kept it in your case with a humidifier, that could be the reason. When you say in the same room, that doesn't sound like it's been in the case but I could be over reading your comment.

5% RH explains a lot. Nominal RH limits without humidifying or dehumidifying are ~40% to ~60% RH, IMHO.

Some fairly recent, well known, mahogany ukes (made in a non-controlled environment in Thailand) developed cracks when not living in acceptable RH locations. So, with 5% RH, I would expect cracks. Kudos to Kamaka and Ohana for surviving. Heck, even my fingers can get a little dry and cracked in that low of RH.

UkeKiddinMe
10-06-2013, 05:47 AM
This stuff shouldn't happen. And when it does happen, it should happen over a much longer period of time.
Proper RH or not.

cigarfan
10-06-2013, 06:00 AM
Man, dampen a sponge and throw it in a ziplock bag with a few holes in it. Slip it in the case and stop the bleeding! You should be humidifying wooden instruments of any kind in RH like that.

Dan Uke
10-06-2013, 06:03 AM
This stuff shouldn't happen. And when it does happen, it should happen over a much longer period of time.
Proper RH or not.

I have no idea but that's like saying nothing will happen if you keep your uke in the trunk on a hot day since it's only a couple of hours.

UkeKiddinMe
10-06-2013, 06:36 AM
I have no idea but that's like saying nothing will happen if you keep your uke in the trunk on a hot day since it's only a couple of hours.

I will respectfully disagree. This winds up being more about builders cutting a corner and using woods that aren't ready for production than it is about an instrument not being at the right RH for a few days.

With today's current techniques, glues, and finishes, no acoustic instrument should start to implode after a few days of being
at the wrong RH.

BlackBearUkes
10-06-2013, 06:43 AM
If a uke cracks on the top or back plate due to extremes in humidity, once the crack happens and the pressure is relieved, that should be the end of it. If the plate continues to crack in multiple areas, that says to me the wood was not seasoned when the uke was built and the wood is now drying out. I have seen this in many ukes from Thailand and that part of the world.

If I were the OP, I would avoid ukes from that maker or company, or at least that kind of wood.

hawaii 50
10-06-2013, 06:50 AM
I have no idea but that's like saying nothing will happen if you keep your uke in the trunk on a hot day since it's only a couple of hours.

I agree with Nongdam..

5 % RH and your uke will dry up and crack right away...wow
40% RH is the lowest it should be...put a humidifier in your case and close it...you might need more than 1 humidifier as they only give you a 5 to 10% rise in the humidity each...so if it 5%...that only takes it up to 15% RH...way to low...

and just because your Kamaka does not have any cracks does not mean much...each Ukulele different,could be how the wood was dried....each compay has different ways...some better than others...IMO

get a real gage that reads the Relative Humidity...

RH is totally different from the humidity readings outside....

btw...I do not know too many Hawaiian Companies that build production Mahogany Ukuleles...so not say the brand has me thinking not built in Hawaii too..

my 2 cents

Flyinby
10-06-2013, 06:53 AM
I'm glad to see you didn't mention the dealer or brand yet. I've seen too many threads where someone posts a gripe before even contacting the dealer or manufacturer, and it seems really unfair, because the post will remain no matter what the cause or even if it's the buyer's fault.

It may be as simple as a defective batch of wood improperly dried, and things can happen to anyone, even the experts. Or, it may be the radical change in humidity. Your other instruments may have been more gradually acclimated, and the wood contracted more gradually. I once took a nearly new acacia koa uke to the desert near Palm Springs for a week, and the neck warped. A solid Mahogany was taken to a music festival in mid-June, and I noticed a seam appear that never showed in months in our normal 40-50% humidity area. It doesn't take long.

However, they may take care of it, so please give them the chance despite some urging you to let them know more details...better to report results than speculate on whose fault it may or may not be, but I think if I lived in the SD area, which isn't that different from Palm Springs area, I'd use a humidifier on the replacement, even though your older instruments have survived.

Dwave
10-06-2013, 07:17 AM
I'm glad to see you didn't mention the dealer or brand yet. I've seen too many threads where someone posts a gripe before even contacting the dealer or manufacturer, and it seems really unfair, because the post will remain no matter what the cause or even if it's the buyer's fault.

It may be as simple as a defective batch of wood improperly dried, and things can happen to anyone, even the experts. Or, it may be the radical change in humidity. Your other instruments may have been more gradually acclimated, and the wood contracted more gradually. I once took a nearly new acacia koa uke to the desert near Palm Springs for a week, and the neck warped. A solid Mahogany was taken to a music festival in mid-June, and I noticed a seam appear that never showed in months in our normal 40-50% humidity area. It doesn't take long.

However, they may take care of it, so please give them the chance despite some urging you to let them know more details...better to report results than speculate on whose fault it may or may not be, but I think if I lived in the SD area, which isn't that different from Palm Springs area, I'd use a humidifier on the replacement, even though your older instruments have survived.

I agree with your entire post. But has anyone every seen so many splits appear so quickly? 6 total now and yes I started humidifing it immediately after discovering the splits.

v30
10-06-2013, 07:30 AM
You need to give thanks to the uke gods for sparing that kamaka up to now in such low humidity. I hope your luck continues.

Dwave
10-06-2013, 07:36 AM
No issues with other 7 wood instruments in my house and my hollowbody electric is in stand not a case. Yes when I saw the splits I immediately checked out my Kamaka first and am very thankful.

Dan Uke
10-06-2013, 07:53 AM
I have never heard of a new uke self-destruct like yours. Wow! In only a week too. I'm assuming it wasn't made in Hawaii.

You could be right...there are several brands that are imported to Hawaii especially the hog ones.

Ukejenny
10-06-2013, 09:10 AM
I would definitely give some humidity love to the other ukes that are still okay. I feel sure that the maker and seller will be shocked with the amount of cracks, and with them being on the front and back, they will feel the need to make it right.

BlackBearUkes
10-06-2013, 10:55 AM
"It may be as simple as a defective batch of wood improperly dried, and things can happen to anyone, even the experts. "

Actually, all the expert luthiers I know test the wood before they build with it, so building with green wood isn't going to happen. Also, pumping lots of moisture back into the uke now isn't going to fix the cracks, the damage is done. More than likely the uke will continue to come apart even after the repairs.

Shastastan
10-06-2013, 12:03 PM
I live at the other end of the state and we have low humidity here from time to time. I haven't had any problems yet. I have been remiss in putting humidifiers in the cases. A local guitar pro/tech said that they have not had any problems that he knows of. I do have at least one solid mahogany uke but no problems yet. None of my ukes are what is considered as expensive though. We were thinking of getting new ukes on our trip to Kauai next May, but maybe I should reconsider that. I'm going to do more checking regarding this issue at my locale.

I'm sure all of wish you a fair resolution to your problem. Really sorry that this happened to any uker.

Stan

Radio Flyer
10-06-2013, 04:21 PM
i personally would like to know the name of the ukulele. i don't think this is a humidity problem from what has been said and i am in the process of deciding on a uke buy in the near future. i don't think the dealer is at fault, they assume the product is of good quality (you did say it was from a reputable, good dealer) so i don't think we need to know their name, but the uke manufacturer should be known. this is a forum about ukes, the good, the bad and the ugly. if the maker has a good reputation, then a mistake was made. if they acknowledge it and correct it i don't think they will lose sales, possibly even gain respect. i do believe in fairness, but to the consumer as well as the maker.

Dwave
10-06-2013, 05:44 PM
i personally would like to know the name of the ukulele. i don't think this is a humidity problem from what has been said and i am in the process of deciding on a uke buy in the near future. i don't think the dealer is at fault, they assume the product is of good quality (you did say it was from a reputable, good dealer) so i don't think we need to know their name, but the uke manufacturer should be known. this is a forum about ukes, the good, the bad and the ugly. if the maker has a good reputation, then a mistake was made. if they acknowledge it and correct it i don't think they will lose sales, possibly even gain respect. i do believe in fairness, but to the consumer as well as the maker.

Respectfully, I would like to wait until I hear from the dealer and yes I would agree it is more of a builder issues then the dealers. Also the dealer may have more insight into this brand or if this issue has happened with this brand or like quality before. They touch allot more ukes than I do and would like to give them the benefit of the doubt. I would tend to agree with BlackBearUkes post and a few other knowledgeable posts on this issue, to include a few PM on this matter have been appreciated.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-06-2013, 09:06 PM
This stuff shouldn't happen. And when it does happen, it should happen over a much longer period of time.
Proper RH or not.

Not true. I've seen an uke pop in a matter of hours when it was transported from the wet side of our island to the dry side. It's the rapid changes that are the dangerous ones.

Kekani
10-06-2013, 09:20 PM
I'm still trying to figure out the "well Known" builder that makes Mahogany ukes for production, in Hawaii.

hawaii 50
10-10-2013, 12:37 PM
I was wondering what ever happened with this uke....

Dwave
10-10-2013, 05:32 PM
It took a few days but issue is resolved with help from dealer through warranty, waiting on my new replacement ukulele. Thanks to all for the opinions, support and PM's.

mm stan
10-10-2013, 06:59 PM
I'm still trying to figure out the "well Known" builder that makes Mahogany ukes for production, in Hawaii.
Aaron, I am sure you know which it was....he he :)