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NukeDOC
12-10-2007, 05:36 AM
i wanted to start a new thread so as to not stray too far off topic on the other thread.

anyway, if you didnt follow, on my 6 string tenor lanikai, the E string is basically dead when it is plucked. there is about 20% of the sustain of any other strings at any given fret.

my other two ukuleles and my brother's do no do that at all on any frets.

e-lo has also had the same problem with his g-string tenor on the 5th fret but on the C string. his theory is that the harmonics kinda cancel each other out for some reason. makes sense.

so i was wondering if anyone has had this problem, has any other ideas why it happens, and has figured out how to alleviate it.

E-Lo Roberts
12-10-2007, 09:38 AM
Just had another thought. Perhaps the 6th fret is slightly too high, therefore, muting the 5th fret note. Being that the strings are nylon (not steel), it could cause a deadening effect instead of a typical fret buzzing noise found on steel string guitars. But on the another hand, this would probably cause a few other strings at the 5th fret to mute (deaden) also. Once again, another unproven E-Lo theory... Hey Dominator, you make ukes! Give us some insight and help dude! Thanks...e

Duke
12-10-2007, 10:30 AM
i think know whats going on....
i also had this problem on my bushman jenny at the tone g#. it sounds more like "plonk" instead of "plonnnngggg"... you know?

i think it has something to do with the body. every uke (i think) has a specific tone which the body resonate on. so if i pluk an E its ok; the tone can ring out on the string. a high C is a little higher -> also good.
but on my jenny the resonation point is on G# ; so on this tone the vibration of the string is taken away more from the body.

so if the body is a little bigger or smaller the tone that the uke is taken the vibraton of the string away is a little lower or higher. on my pono the body is little bigger and the plonk-bass-tone is on the open C-string.
i dont know... maybe on better ukuleles this problem is taken away by building it very right. mh...

hope this is it what you mean....

NukeDOC
12-10-2007, 10:57 AM
that makes a lot of sense too. so maybe when i install my pickup, the change in geometry of the cavity space will alleviate that? maybe? hehehe. i hope so. i love this uke. but i would love it even more if i could turn that "plonk" into "plooooooong" haha

E-Lo Roberts
12-11-2007, 03:10 AM
I'm with the DUKE on this one...but would still welcome more input on the subject. Thanks, e..

Dominator
12-11-2007, 06:12 AM
Guys, I'm by no means an expert in this area but I can share with you some previous information posted on another forum, regarding this topic, by Dave Means of Glyph Custom Ukuleles. Dave is an incredible luthier and I own one of his tenors. He really knows what he's talking about. One thing I do with the instruments I build is use a carbon fiber reinforement rod in the neck to not only add stiffness but to also transfer sound better and help eliminate those "wolf" or dead notes.

Here are some extracts from Dave.


Your diagnosis is correct. These kinds of problems are pretty much inherent
to the design and materials, and are nearly impossible to fix in an existing
instrument. About the only hope is to experiment with adding some mass to the
headstock or to the top or back (some "stickum" like "blue tac" putty, etc.)
on the inside of the instrument. This may shift the resonant frequency enough
that it doesn't fall exactly on a fretted or open-string note. -- Dave

Hope this helps in some way.

E-Lo Roberts
12-11-2007, 08:23 AM
Hope this helps in some way.

Dom, thanks for this very helpful response. I think I might experiment around myself with the inside of my G-String tenor to try and shift this resonant frequency a bit. My initial first thoughts on this would be to create a small, movable, wooden sound post that would send vibrations from the top of the soundboard to the backside of the body. Or perhaps a bendable material that would be flexible enough to shim and create a "bridge" between top and bottom without creating too much upward tension as to compromise the integrity of the Koa wood. Maybe I could find a "sweet spot" that helps the problem...who knows?? Any thoughts on my theory? Thanks, e..

grappler
01-16-2008, 07:15 PM
i've got a problem.

When i read This thread i dont quite understand what you guys mean by dead tones at certain frets.. can u guys give me a simple explanation?

Also what should i do if im playing a chord right.. usually its 1202. i hear this buzzing sound..
What does that mean? and how do i fix it? Hence me getting a new uke.

NukeDOC
01-16-2008, 08:22 PM
i guess the best way i can describe what im talking about is...

when i play the E string depressed at the 5th fret, instead of it sounding like:

piiiiiiiiiiiiiiing

it sounds like:

piiiiiinggh

hahaha just sound it out. hopefully you'll know what im talking about now.

as for your buzzing sound... play the chord. now make sure you dont move a muscle in your left hand. now play each string individually. are one of those strings buzzing when you play it? if so, thats the problem. either you are not pressing down hard enough, or the action on your uke is too low and that string is making contact with another fret as it is vibrating.

btw that chord 1202 is an E7.

do you have a pickup? if you do, try shoving the wires around inside. just shift them away from wherever they are at. but be careful not to damage anything (hard to do, but not impossible). now try it.

still buzzing? i dont know then. sorry.

grappler
01-19-2008, 04:53 PM
i guess the best way i can describe what im talking about is...

when i play the E string depressed at the 5th fret, instead of it sounding like:

piiiiiiiiiiiiiiing

it sounds like:

piiiiiinggh

hahaha just sound it out. hopefully you'll know what im talking about now.

as for your buzzing sound... play the chord. now make sure you dont move a muscle in your left hand. now play each string individually. are one of those strings buzzing when you play it? if so, thats the problem. either you are not pressing down hard enough, or the action on your uke is too low and that string is making contact with another fret as it is vibrating.

btw that chord 1202 is an E7.

do you have a pickup? if you do, try shoving the wires around inside. just shift them away from wherever they are at. but be careful not to damage anything (hard to do, but not impossible). now try it.

still buzzing? i dont know then. sorry.

Thanks man.

It still buzzes abit, but it gets really annoying sometimes. Just a tiny bit.
I think its time for me to get a new uke.