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ShortCut
01-17-2009, 11:17 AM
Hey everyone. I'm an aspiring luthier ( I geuss you would call it that) and am trying to figure out how people bend the sides for the ukulele. Ive seen how the get put in the jig I think its called, to make the shape. But what has to be done in order for the sides to bend? Im sure you cant just start bending it right away, the wood would snap then right? Im a little confused on this if anyone would like to help clear this up!

Thanks, Mitch

Pete Howlett
01-17-2009, 11:45 AM
Try this (http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=qhRi6KWby5M) video for an explanation...

ShortCut
01-17-2009, 11:53 AM
That helped, thanks

dave g
01-18-2009, 01:43 AM
http://www.wsukes.com/bendingsides.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EzS0vWp3ycs

:)

Matt Clara
12-13-2009, 01:23 PM
http://www.wsukes.com/bendingsides.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EzS0vWp3ycs

:)

Great vid, Dave. I'm putting together a bending pipe using a bulb, much the same as yours, and I'm curious if you simply stick the bulb in the end, or do you try to get it right down to where you're actually doing the bending. Also, do you suspend the bulb in there, or do you just lay it on its side?

camface
12-13-2009, 04:10 PM
I like your forms, Dave. Nice and simple. Do you find those kinds of forms are easier than the full forms (do you know what I mean by full forms?) to work with?

Flyfish57
12-13-2009, 05:39 PM
Try this (http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=qhRi6KWby5M) video for an explanation...

Pete,

It said "This video has been removed by the user. "

Matt Clara
12-14-2009, 02:55 AM
Pete,

It said "This video has been removed by the user. "

I resurrected an old thread to ask my question of Dave, and, Pete does tend to remove his videos/images after awhile. Several of his old posts here have links like that in them.

dave g
12-14-2009, 02:57 AM
http://www.wsukes.com/temp/bender.jpg

pie_man_25
12-14-2009, 03:55 AM
you guys think I could use a (possibly modified) clothing iron for this? I figure, if you could use that male half-form as like a "workbench" so I'm pressing the board, using the iron, into the shape of the form, just an idea, I think it might make it a bit quicker.

edit: sorry I'm bad at wording things, I mean like, you clamp the male half-form level, either to a table, or with a bench-mounted clamp (don't know the exact name, but we all have 'em) then place the board onto said form, perhaps clamping in to one side, then using the clothing iron (again possibly modified, so as to accomodate the curves of the body) to heat, and press the wood into the form, then moving it onto that doweled-board form for drying.

was that better?

Matt Clara
12-14-2009, 06:00 AM
you guys think I could use a (possibly modified) clothing iron for this? I figure, if you could use that male half-form as like a "workbench" so I'm pressing the board, using the iron, into the shape of the form, just an idea, I think it might make it a bit quicker.

edit: sorry I'm bad at wording things, I mean like, you clamp the male half-form level, either to a table, or with a bench-mounted clamp (don't know the exact name, but we all have 'em) then place the board onto said form, perhaps clamping in to one side, then using the clothing iron (again possibly modified, so as to accomodate the curves of the body) to heat, and press the wood into the form, then moving it onto that doweled-board form for drying.

was that better?

Caveat: I'm a nube who hasn't tried bending yet. BUT, using a form like that, you're asking the wood to bend over the entire width of a curve all at once, so you need to spread the heat out over the entire curve being bent while bending it. A flat iron wouldn't do that (it would at first, but when the wood starts bending, flat wouldn't cover the entire bent area evenly). What you're describing is a poor man's Fox style bender. You might want to look into building one of those. With light bulbs instead of the flat iron, that is.

Timbuck
12-14-2009, 08:01 AM
Look at this film from the old days..No pipe, no fox bender, no now't:eek:

http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=83414

Pete Howlett
12-14-2009, 08:18 AM
You have far too much time on your hands Ken!

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
12-14-2009, 08:30 AM
Wow, what a wonderful video. Thanks for finding that. I'm not quite ready to try that bending method yet however, maybe Pete will. How supple that wood must be! I love that sanding method. Looks like they're building a guitar a minute.
Just goes to show, as has been said before, there is no one right way of doing things.

Pete Howlett
12-14-2009, 08:46 AM
That's gotta be plywood!

Timbuck
12-14-2009, 09:20 AM
I like the belt sander ..where do you get belts that long???.

The factory was "Egmond" in "Holland" I believe.

erich@muttcrew.net
12-14-2009, 11:52 AM
Great vid, Dave. I'm putting together a bending pipe using a bulb, much the same as yours, and I'm curious if you simply stick the bulb in the end, or do you try to get it right down to where you're actually doing the bending. Also, do you suspend the bulb in there, or do you just lay it on its side?

Matt, I'm just guessing here, but don't you think the light bulb is going to heat up the whole pipe, especially if you close the end. To some degree, it probably depends on what the pipe is made of and how thick it is - like a frying pan.

Anyway, side bending and finishing are two parts of the whole instrument building process that we really haven't mastered yet, and this is one question I've been wanting to ask for a while. So thanks.

:cheers: Erich

Matt Clara
12-14-2009, 12:52 PM
Matt, I'm just guessing here, but don't you think the light bulb is going to heat up the whole pipe, especially if you close the end. To some degree, it probably depends on what the pipe is made of and how thick it is - like a frying pan.

Anyway, side bending and finishing are two parts of the whole instrument building process that we really haven't mastered yet, and this is one question I've been wanting to ask for a while. So thanks.

:cheers: Erich

That is what I think, but I didn't want to spend a bunch a time bending unsuccessfully only to find out I just have to slide the bulb down to the other end. And, I should mention, my pipe is a full 12 inches long, where Dave's appears shorter, but bigger around, [insert tasteless joke about Mrs. G's preferences here]. ;)

thistle3585
12-14-2009, 04:50 PM
I like the belt sander ..where do you get belts that long???.

The factory was "Egmond" in "Holland" I believe.

That was a stroke sander. I have a company "Sandpaper America" make custom belts for my belt sander because t they're an odd length. They're a great company and very reasonable.

pie_man_25
12-15-2009, 05:24 AM
Caveat: I'm a nube who hasn't tried bending yet. BUT, using a form like that, you're asking the wood to bend over the entire width of a curve all at once, so you need to spread the heat out over the entire curve being bent while bending it. A flat iron wouldn't do that (it would at first, but when the wood starts bending, flat wouldn't cover the entire bent area evenly). What you're describing is a poor man's Fox style bender. You might want to look into building one of those. With light bulbs instead of the flat iron, that is.

you make some sense, about the flat surface of the iron, that's why I was going to modify the flat bending iron, to accomodate the curves. thanks a lot for the info, this has helped me figure out a lot about different side-bending methods, I'm just trying to find out as much as I can, BEFORE trying it out, so that I can minimise first-time mistakes

Matt Clara
12-15-2009, 05:27 AM
http://www.amazon.com/Hot-Tools-Supertool-Professional-Curling/dp/B0002L93N2
;)

erich@muttcrew.net
12-15-2009, 06:13 AM
And, I should mention...

We better not go into the "12 inch tool" jokes, as they might irritate other members and dismay the moderators ;)

Anyway, your longer bending pipe might not conduct the heat all the way from one end to the other. I guess it would depend on the metal, the thickness, etc. Do you really need the 12 inches or could you shorten the pipe to, say, 8 inches? (no joking intended)

erich@muttcrew.net
12-15-2009, 06:22 AM
http://www.amazon.com/Hot-Tools-Supertool-Professional-Curling/dp/B0002L93N2
;)

"Honey, I used your curling iron to bend some rosewood. I hope you don't mind..."

Screams of bloody murder, followed by three or more days of silence.

Naw, better not.

Matt Clara
12-15-2009, 12:05 PM
We better not go into the "12 inch tool" jokes, as they might irritate other members and dismay the moderators ;)

Anyway, your longer bending pipe might not conduct the heat all the way from one end to the other. I guess it would depend on the metal, the thickness, etc. Do you really need the 12 inches or could you shorten the pipe to, say, 8 inches? (no joking intended)

I've got a guy I know modifying it so I can clamp it or bolt it to my bench, and he's adding a little tab to the end with a small circular plate attached to rotate over the end, allowing me to regulate the amount of heat trapped in the pipe. I think I might be too late to tell him to take some off the end. I'll call him tonight.

funaddict
12-17-2009, 06:12 PM
This is what I've been using to heat up my bending pipe. I saw this somewhere on the web. I squeezed the charcoal starter in my vise so that it fit snuggly into my pipe. I cut the hot wire and wired the dimmer switch into the line to control heat level. Charcoal starter is 550 watts and dimmer is rated for 600 watts. I mounted the switch in an old single gang electrical box, and clamped the pipe in my (metal) vise while bending the sides and bindings.
Electric charcoal starter - $10
Dimmer switch - $4

Matt Clara
12-18-2009, 01:33 AM
This is what I've been using to heat up my bending pipe. I saw this somewhere on the web. I squeezed the charcoal starter in my vise so that it fit snuggly into my pipe. I cut the hot wire and wired the dimmer switch into the line to control heat level. Charcoal starter is 550 watts and dimmer is rated for 600 watts. I mounted the switch in an old single gang electrical box, and clamped the pipe in my (metal) vise while bending the sides and bindings.
Electric charcoal starter - $10
Dimmer switch - $4

Thanks. I haven't bought my 100 watt bulb yet, so I'll look into it. ;) I think the last one I saw like yours, the guy recommended some ridiculously expensive dimmer switch, and I didn't read any more after that. Question, do you find you use the dimmer switch, i.e., do you run it at less than full power?

funaddict
12-19-2009, 05:23 AM
Matt,
I believe I run it upwards of 80% of power. I haven't tested it on many different thicknesses or types of wood yet, but it seems to be able to do the job. I couldn't find that expensive dimmer from the original article, but the $4 one I use seems to work fine. I don't think you need to take apart the handle to get at the internal wiring either. I did, but just ended up putting it back together and cutting the hot wire and wiring the switch in.

Alan