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bigphil
11-17-2013, 04:25 AM
Has anyone here used the Kenneth Michael Guitars binding routing tool? If so, what is your impression. I'm still mulling over techniques to cut my binding channels. I could make something like this fairly easy...

http://kennethmichaelguitars.com/images/P10101054.JPG

jcalkin
11-17-2013, 02:38 PM
A lot of us probably tried that fixture, on the router base, though, not on a table. They can work fine. Multiple passes at the same setting may be necessary to make even rabbets all the way around.

bigphil
11-17-2013, 04:44 PM
Thanks for the response, I started making one today. :)

oudin
11-18-2013, 08:54 AM
I use this type of deal. I tried all sorts of fancy jigs but this one is by far the simplest and with multiple passes gets great results. Its virtually impossible to make any mistake or have any accidents except tearout. I use a bearing to set depth of cut rather than the adjustable KM style. Not better, just different. With my 35 year old home made router table and my ancient craftsman 5626 my setup sure does look contrived. And that it is. I'm about to use it this afternoon on a rosewood/redwood tenor. Aloha!

rudy
11-18-2013, 10:27 AM
Hi bigphil,
I'm always uncomfortable routing blind and prefer to see the cut as it's made. Check out my binding router ideas here:
http://www.bluestemstrings.com/pageUke1.html

resoman
11-18-2013, 10:41 AM
I tried a bunch of different routing methods and finally built a Fleischmen type jig and that has been the best for me. Like Rudy I want to see what's going on. You still gotta bend down to look but I can see and feel what's going on better. Some of those other methods can go bad fast and when it happens it's FAST. The only down side to the Fleischman type is that it's rather large and takes up more space.

bigphil
11-18-2013, 11:53 AM
I'm always uncomfortable routing blind and prefer to see the cut as it's made. Check out my binding router ideas here:
I've looked through your stuff pretty well Rudy. Thanks for the tips. The reviews on the Stew Mac site weren't very glowing though using their router base. I notice you have modified it a bit, but most folks say just trying to hold the dremel vertically takes a long learning curve at best. So I didn't consider that much...

bigphil
11-18-2013, 11:59 AM
I tried a bunch of different routing methods and finally built a Fleischmen type jig and that has been the best for me. Like Rudy I want to see what's going on. You still gotta bend down to look but I can see and feel what's going on better. Some of those other methods can go bad fast and when it happens it's FAST. The only down side to the Fleischman type is that it's rather large and takes up more space.
Yes, the articulated fixtures look like the way to go if you're going to be doing a lot of this. I keep saying, I'm just building this one! Indeed, I won't be doing a lot of this. So anyhoos, I'm pretty well along with my version of the KMG fixture. Here's the wood part, gonna mount it to the router tomorrow.

60980

We'll see how some test pieces go before risking the uke body.

resoman
11-18-2013, 12:08 PM
"I keep saying, I'm just building this one!"

Ya???? Just keep sayin that, ha ha ;)

rudy
11-18-2013, 12:23 PM
I've looked through your stuff pretty well Rudy. Thanks for the tips. The reviews on the Stew Mac site weren't very glowing though using their router base. I notice you have modified it a bit, but most folks say just trying to hold the Dremel vertically takes a long learning curve at best. So I didn't consider that much...
The use of a router base depends on the type of body binding you're using and if you're incorporating purfling, which I don't use. It also depends on how much of a body arch you have. The basic router base can be used for a low arch profile, and higher arches are better served with the modified convex base that I show on my website.
If you are referring to the actual Stu-Mac binding attachment for a Dremel then I'd agree that the learning curve is high. Too high. I used the original version several times with varying amounts of difficulty. The key to using the router setup successfully is to use a piloted bit. That takes all the finesse out of it as long as you have a base that keeps your router somewhat perpendicular to the top.
Binding is one of those personal issues that I think require someone to find a technique that they are most comfortable with.

jcalkin
11-18-2013, 04:02 PM
I bought the Stew-Mac tower rig. I'm perfectly happy with it. Any kind of router base design is a PITA. Many of us started there, just about everyone moved on. The Fleishman setup is easily the coolest looking, though.

Timbuck
11-18-2013, 10:20 PM
I made mine out of a swivel tv bracket..But the Balancing arm method is the best.

Here is a link to a discussion on binding cutters from a few years back.
http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?28134-Cutting-binding

bigphil
11-19-2013, 12:29 AM
I went and checked out your TV mount fixture Ken, very cool! If I get around to more uke building, I'll probably do something similar. Thanks!

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
11-19-2013, 04:03 AM
I've used 3 methods, the articulated arm, the tower and hand held.

Weighted articulated arm are definitely best but im not smart enough to make one and have no real need.

Some laminate trimmers come with an attachment (see 2nd link below) that is perfect for riding along the side.... Such as this one which is what i use for purflings with down cut spiral bit.
http://www.grizzly.com/outlet/Trim-Router-Metal-Body/H7790

A better pic of the attachment is here
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f4/Makita_laminate_trimmer.jpg

I found on ebay a pre built/owned stew mac tower with ridgid router, bit and bearings for $160 which was a good deal.

Before finding this, i was using the grizzly lam trimmer for bindings as well which worked just fine.

bigphil
11-19-2013, 06:20 AM
Thanks everyone for your thoughts and insight. As always, I appreciate input from those with much more experience than me! :D