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young-lecky
12-03-2013, 07:01 AM
What is the maximum thickness people on here would accept for their soundboard?

I bought a bit of spruce to use and i thought it was going to be pre thicknessed but it isn't :(

I don't have a thicknesser planner so this will now have to be done by hand...

Cheers :)

ksquine
12-03-2013, 07:51 AM
what size uke?
Tenor I'd say 0.1" max for spruce. Soprano, 0.08"

young-lecky
12-03-2013, 07:59 AM
whoops forgot to mention that, yea its a soprano that I'm gonna make :)

Thanks

What about the sides and back? I know they are thicker, but is there a ratio in which it works?

Timbuck
12-03-2013, 09:10 AM
I make the sides and back .075" and the soundboard .0625" (1/16") :D

bluesuke
12-03-2013, 09:11 AM
We take ours anywhere from 2mm to 1.7mm it all depends on the wood

young-lecky
12-03-2013, 09:15 AM
Cheers all :)

Mark Roberts Ukuleles
12-18-2013, 02:01 PM
My suggestion is that it's all about stiffness...not thickness. Every tonewood is different. Two Koa trees growing right next to each other can have very different densities and strength-to-weight ratios. Don't generalize your wood.
Start at thickness you know will be too thick, then slowly start taking it down little by little...testing it for tonal response and deflection. Look at it, feel it, listen to it. Build your instrument, and remember what you built into it.
Only then can you judge how to improve the next one.
Aside from these things you can start taking notes for each "piece" and type of wood.
I use those methods, plus I measure/record weight thickness, and deflection for each piece. It will be a reference for the future.
You can see a simple system I use for recording deflection here......
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=699957660034522&set=a.158182737545353.35004.158169180880042&type=3&theater
There are three photos in a series.

dmecha1012
12-18-2013, 02:17 PM
My suggestion is that it's all about stiffness...not thickness. Every tonewood is different. Two Koa trees growing right next to each other can have very different densities and strength-to-weight ratios. Don't generalize your wood.
Start at thickness you know will be too thick, then slowly start taking it down little by little...testing it for tonal response and deflection. Look at it, feel it, listen to it. Build your instrument, and remember what you built into it.
Only then can you judge how to improve the next one.
Aside from these things you can start taking notes for each "piece" and type of wood.
I use those methods, plus I measure/record weight thickness, and deflection for each piece. It will be a reference for the future.
You can see a simple system I use for recording deflection here......
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=699957660034522&set=a.158182737545353.35004.158169180880042&type=3&theater
There are three photos in a series.

I looked on your Facebook page. How does that work?