PDA

View Full Version : where is everyone?



urcuzzn
12-05-2013, 10:10 AM
615646156561566
Seems a lot of the professional builders have fled the scene.
have i missed something important?
I know u r really putting yourself out there when you participate.
feel free to pm me.
Yours truly
urcuzzn aka peter Lieberman
shameless promotion

soupking
12-05-2013, 11:26 AM
New stuff is looking mighty fine, Peter.

Doc_J
12-05-2013, 02:29 PM
I miss Rick's and Pete's quick wit and on-the-mark advice.

Beautiful uke Peter.

aaronckeim
12-05-2013, 05:17 PM
Hey Peter- I see you have one of those new fancy scrapers there. How do you like it?

dustartist
12-05-2013, 06:18 PM
You are right, there are people who do not post as frequently as they once did. I count myself among them. There was some unpleasantness earlier this year, and the bad taste lingers for a while. I am going back into the woodwork for now.

Sven
12-05-2013, 06:29 PM
Hey Peter- I see you have one of those new fancy scrapers there. How do you like it?

Aaron, I have the small one and I think it's worth having. Easier in some cases, better in some cases than card scrapers. Bit of a pain to sharpen though, but you don't need to do that too often.

As for where are people, I wouldn't think I'm missed as much as Rick but for some reason I don't post as much. Maybe I'm too set in my ways to ask for, or give any useful advice.

Sven

Teek
12-05-2013, 06:49 PM
Hi Peter, just chiming in to say LOVELY work, and that I just patted one of your older six strings and put it back in it's case a few minutes ago. It's a little beat up but it's a honey!

flyingace
12-05-2013, 07:25 PM
I was wondering if that "unpleasantness" has led to the lack of postings as of late. Did it put off the hawaiian builders over the Kimo/HMS thing? Hopefully the community will recover and come back!

OH and Peter, great looking work! Envious! I'd love to learn to build someday but I better just concentrate on learning to play better and better and admire the art of building from afar!

rudy
12-06-2013, 05:28 AM
Having joined not all that long ago and coming from an outsider's perspective I have to honestly say that UU builder's forum (at least from MY perspective) seems to harbor a tendency for acerbic replies, and I know I'm certainly not as inclined to participate here as much as I do on other forums.

I come at it perhaps from a different perspective, but as a "non-professional" builder I think of public forums more as a way to share and participate in methodology that might benefit the small shop builder. I might be that there just are a lot fewer participating builders than I'm used to seeing.

If I post something that I've just discovered it's a bit odd to have someone reply with "I did that a long time ago." It's not supportive, informative, it's somewhat mean-spirited, and IMHO totally lacking in taste. Maybe some just operate that way, but I think it contributes to some having the opinion that they would be better off not posting for fear of critical response.

That's just me, though.

rubber necker
12-06-2013, 05:32 AM
I was wondering if that "unpleasantness" has led to the lack of postings as of late. Did it put off the hawaiian builders over the Kimo/HMS thing? Hopefully the community will recover and come back!

OH and Peter, great looking work! Envious! I'd love to learn to build someday but I better just concentrate on learning to play better and better and admire the art of building from afar!

I was wondering what had happened too,i guess that explains it
but what happened to Rick Turner? he was the best at giving Real advice

Timbuck
12-06-2013, 05:39 AM
but what happened to Rick Turner? he was the best at giving Real advice
He still posts occasionaly on the "Uke technical support page"

mketom
12-07-2013, 08:16 AM
Having joined not all that long ago and coming from an outsider's perspective I have to honestly say that UU builder's forum (at least from MY perspective) seems to harbor a tendency for acerbic replies, and I know I'm certainly not as inclined to participate here as much as I do on other forums...

...Maybe some just operate that way, but I think it contributes to some having the opinion that they would be better off not posting for fear of critical response.


I understand how you could feel that way but in the couple of years I have followed this segment of the forum I have learned incredible info and building techniques from the best ukulele builders in the world.

For me, I first learned to search the archived posts for answers, because I have always found others willing to help and teach me if I said "Hey I read your advice about ___ and have a question" or "it didn't work for me, what's up with that?" I think the acerbic comments you may have seen were generally the result of someone posting something like - "hey, I want to make the world-best ukulele with my first one, AND I know all about that 'experience yadda-yadda' so just tell me what to do in one post"

Back to Peter's original post now - Thanks you guys, for being here. Ken (also ever-present) is right, people are still here if you look about a bit.

BlackBearUkes
12-07-2013, 09:07 AM
One of the major problems, in my view, with the section is that there is no seperation from the pro's and the beginners. First timers are overly excited by all this and tend to want to share, nothing wrong with that. However, many of the posts are redundant and are of no interest to the pro's for the most part. Someone asks a question and someone else will answer it with little or no knowledge and then the stage is set. Some luthiers were quick to jump in hard when they see misinformation presented as knowledge, and in my opinion there is nothing wrong with that as long as the person is not attacked, just the misinformation. Some people can not separate the two and problems arise.

Professional luthiers don't always agree on techniques, materials and methods and if they want to yell and scream at each other over those techiniques, etc., I think they should be allowed to do so. It makes for interesting dialogue and exchange of ideas. We can handle it and if some can't they can always stay away. It is when we are told we can't, well then we tend to lose interest and decline to contribute further. This forum has become somewhat dictortial IMO and hence the absense of the stronger personalities. That is my take on the current situation.

Dan Uke
12-07-2013, 09:10 AM
One thing to add, it's the owners of any website that dictates the flow of the forums

BlackBearUkes
12-07-2013, 10:27 AM
One thing to add, it's the owners of any website that dictates the flow of the forums

And so they have, hence the question :"Where is everyone?"

rudy
12-07-2013, 02:42 PM
I understand how you could feel that way but in the couple of years I have followed this segment of the forum I have learned incredible info and building techniques from the best ukulele builders in the world.

For me, I first learned to search the archived posts for answers, because I have always found others willing to help and teach me if I said "Hey I read your advice about ___ and have a question" or "it didn't work for me, what's up with that?" I think the acerbic comments you may have seen were generally the result of someone posting something like - "hey, I want to make the world-best ukulele with my first one, AND I know all about that 'experience yadda-yadda' so just tell me what to do in one post"

Back to Peter's original post now - Thanks you guys, for being here. Ken (also ever-present) is right, people are still here if you look about a bit.

Thank you for PC-ness and understanding my viewpoint. your comments are well-taken.

Being new to UU, the first thing I did as went back and sequentially went through ALL pages of the builder's section for the last year. You can get a pretty good idea of the nature of discussion going back and reading that far, and you start to run into the same topics being posted multiple times.

I learned a long time ago that search engines within the forums are a great way to not illicit a lot of grumbling from participants about the need to re-post something that's already been covered. It's oftentimes a forum's greatest asset.

As far as acerbic comments, I try to practice tongue-biting, realizing the old adage about what to do if you don't have anything good to say still rings true today. The world would be a better place if more folks adopted the practice.

I personally don't like adversarial discussions regardless of how well-meaning they might be, so I tend to leave all the heavy lifting to the big dogs.

Thanks again!

mm stan
12-07-2013, 03:34 PM
Aloha Peter,
That Uke looks amazing and beautiful....sorta like a Mac style....
Yes some feelings have been hurt, I hope they will start to contribute again...as the old adage goes, tomorrows a new day and yesterday is forgotten...

Timbuck
12-07-2013, 10:49 PM
Thank you for PC-ness and understanding my viewpoint. your comments are well-taken.

Being new to UU, the first thing I did as went back and sequentially went through ALL pages of the builder's section for the last year. You can get a pretty good idea of the nature of discussion going back and reading that far, and you start to run into the same topics being posted multiple times.

I learned a long time ago that search engines within the forums are a great way to not illicit a lot of grumbling from participants about the need to re-post something that's already been covered. It's oftentimes a forum's greatest asset.

As far as acerbic comments, I try to practice tongue-biting, realizing the old adage about what to do if you don't have anything good to say still rings true today. The world would be a better place if more folks adopted the practice.

I personally don't like adversarial discussions regardless of how well-meaning they might be, so I tend to leave all the heavy lifting to the big dogs.

Thanks again!
Rudy..You and me have a lot in common :)

Pukulele Pete
12-08-2013, 07:20 AM
Maybe all the good questions have been asked , and answered already .

rudy
12-08-2013, 10:46 AM
Maybe all the good questions have been asked , and answered already .

I like that! It reminds me of a friend I had in high school (over 40 years ago...) that said he wasn't going to play music any longer because all of the possibilities to write good songs were exhausted.:)

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
12-08-2013, 11:55 AM
And so they have, hence the question :"Where is everyone?"

Sadly, this is true. I've limited my contributions lately because being self appointed Misinformation Cop all the time was making me crazy. (Make that crazier!)
I think the lack of real content recently due to the absence of some key contributors is evident to everyone. Tis a pity.

Pondoro
12-08-2013, 12:30 PM
I appreciated the pros and their patience, but sometimes I was frustrated by replies that basically said, "Go buy a $200 piece of gear or you are not serious and I have no time for you." As a hobbyist I have to choose my investments. I make 1-2 ukes per year and if I buy an expensive "whatsit" it will end up used 10 times and sold for $5 at a garage sale when I die. I will put up with a slower less efficient method. Because I only make 1-2 ukes per year that is no big deal. I understand why the pros can't tolerate inefficiency. It is OK to tell me that the expensive tool is faster, but then do not become insulting if I ask for a cheaper way. If you truly do not have time for us amateurs then don't spend your time insulting us. This is not a general problem - many pros (Sven and Timbuck are two shining examples) are extremely patient. But some are not.

jcalkin
12-08-2013, 01:25 PM
If a question receives reasonable answers before I get to it, I don't see much need to add more. So I don't. What I see happening here is that some of the "beginners" and non-pros are doing very nice work, indeed, and there's no reason they shouldn't move into the slots as info providers to the newbies. A pro might know six ways to tackle a given problem, but six non-pros with varying experiences can offer the same advice. I think you are doing a very nice job of taking care of each other. This is my favorite forum on the whole damn web, but it can get tedious and I really should be doing real work instead of hanging out. The site is just evolving. Don't worry about it.

Rick Turner
12-08-2013, 03:38 PM
I've given about as much down and dirty advice and extremely specific information as I think I have that might be useful around these parts. I've also answered a lot of questions "off-forum", especially with regard to modern catalyzed finishes. I've also tired of some of the same old, same old topics and questions coming up where a reasonable search of the UU archives and also of the whole Internet would provide answers...it's my "do your homework before asking questions" routine. I've also gotten very tired of going up against the newly self-proclaimed experts whose knowledge is lacking in depth and experience...there are an awful lot of people (and I'm indicting the Internet "luthiers'" forums in broad strokes...I'm not pointing my fingers at anyone in particular here...) who are just rehashing something they heard or read or feel is intuitively correct...but is not.

I'm also back to writing for publications...Premier Guitar Magazine and Acoustic Guitar Magazine...which leave me less time to be clacking away.

And finally, I need to spend less time talking about it and more time doing it which, honestly, involves moving even farther away from techniques and methods of use to hobbyists. I'm on a major push to get all possible guitar, bass, and uke parts into CAD and then coming off of my CNC machine. The only forum that really covers that in the lutherie field is over at the OLF...the "Official Luthiers' Forum". Yes, it's a pompous and cumbersome title, but the CNC section there is pretty good. With a little luck, in about two months, my uke necks, fingerboards, and bridges will all be CNC carved. Then I'll take a good look at better and faster benders.

I cannot afford for lutherie to be a hobby; I need for it to be a better source of income. So my mantra has to be: "Don't talk about it; do it." I still check in, primarily on Uke Talk and the tech forum to see if I can help without getting caught up in endless circular discussions, but that's about it.

Kekani
12-08-2013, 05:33 PM
Funny how things come in cycles. I've been playing a lot the last two years. Posting a fair amount. After my stint in setting up my sound system (and building bass cabs), I am rejuvinated in my new jigs (made of Baltic Birch ply - no, not the HD stuff), which I taught a class on at this year's UGH exhibition. Coincidentally, I remember Rick (or was it Chuck) stating a while ago, that endless posting is a "time suck". I've realized that, and have been aggressively getting into new builds. John's recent Ala Moana Koi was pivotal for me, as was MGM's passing.

I believe everyone's still here, checking in now and then, but not being the "forum police" as Chuck put it. Personally, I'm in the shop more now, and its well worth it. "People's Choice" at the UGH Exhibition is not a bad result. Yeah, totally self-serving, that last statement :p

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
12-08-2013, 08:10 PM
Funny how things come in cycles. I've been playing a lot the last two years. Posting a fair amount. After my stint in setting up my sound system (and building bass cabs), I am rejuvinated in my new jigs (made of Baltic Birch ply - no, not the HD stuff), which I taught a class on at this year's UGH exhibition. Coincidentally, I remember Rick (or was it Chuck) stating a while ago, that endless posting is a "time suck". I've realized that, and have been aggressively getting into new builds. John's recent Ala Moana Koi was pivotal for me, as was MGM's passing.

I believe everyone's still here, checking in now and then, but not being the "forum police" as Chuck put it. Personally, I'm in the shop more now, and its well worth it. "People's Choice" at the UGH Exhibition is not a bad result. Yeah, totally self-serving, that last statement :p

Congrats Aaron, Would love to see a pic.

AndrewKuker
12-09-2013, 01:29 AM
Personally, I have more to cover without Mike. That's not someone I'll ever be able to replace. And I'm super ambitious for what our team can give and accomplish and improve on. You know that drive Peter. You get it done. Your next batch is looking sweet!
Beyond work I have a wife and young family, including a son with autism. I used to go back to work when the kids were sleeping but I'm trying to get it done in the day because I "shouldn't be so crazy".
But I love this community, the builders and players, guidance seasoned with sarcasm. Love you guys. And we (HMS) are still large supporters of this forum through targeted Google AdSense. The most popular blogs and forums do over six digits a year from AdSense alone, and it's the result of having legitimate content consistently. Those with real experience that give of their time to share useful information here are by far it's biggest asset, and should be thanked for helping to make this portal legit, and for advertisers like myself and google even caring about it.
But honestly I hope anyone here will contact me direct if I can help them with anything, I really enjoy sharing or getting product info/ opinion, buying customs & photo video geek talk etc.. Hit me up.
I really like the friends and community here and I'm there for you guys any time. But I can't be here and there, at least not now. Maybe later.

\m/ahalo
andrew@theukulelesite.com
(808)781-9168

ernie kleinman
12-09-2013, 05:12 AM
I/ll throw my 2 cents in here. I am on abt 4 luthier forums. What I see is a lot of rude or unruly behaviour mostly from newbies and knowitalls and the occasional pro .This sets off a chain reaction. Bruised feelings , hurt egos etc. Pros have confided that they don/t want to be publicly bashed or have their clients read their posts .Other forums have advertisers that are patently dishonest and not censured by the moderator due to a conflict of interest$$.Again potential posters retreat to the peace and quiet of their workshops. Pros get short tempered and bored with newbie questions.Seperate boards for newcomers who have little or no woodwork experience.Lastly , Ingratitude. If there is one thing that ticks off pros, it/s how so many have forgotten to say please and thank you .Ingratitude is the halitosis of the soul. I hope I/ve answered the original question as best as I know how.Thanks.

Wicked
12-09-2013, 05:21 AM
I'll be honest... I really don't see how you pros can find the time to post at all when I do the mental math on labor vs. price. The actual labor that goes into some of your ukuleles has got to be very close to the labor required for most custom guitars... but the market will bear a $10,000-$15,000 price tag on the guitar.

Timbuck
12-09-2013, 06:56 AM
I'll be honest... I really don't see how you pros can find the time to post at all when I do the mental math on labor vs. price. The actual labor that goes into some of your ukuleles has got to be very close to the labor required for most custom guitars... but the market will bear a $10,000-$15,000 price tag on the guitar.I find time to post:D....today I've glued on three bridges...levelled and dressed the frets on four necks...fitted linings and bracings on a new soprano body..and I have just glued on the back and top, Now I'm sat here with the iPad waiting for Mrs Timbuck to dish out the beef stew and dumplings..It's been a good day;)...But I'm not a Pro..I just do it for fun.

Pete Howlett
12-09-2013, 07:06 AM
I no longer participate here because I feel I have said everything I can say, videoed and published just about everything I have taught myself. Furthermore I am tired of having my honest criticism labelled as rude or otherwise. I admire the stunning work done by some who are posting details of their first builds. Great work - I will continue to visit and look at it for inspiration as I have always done. I am equally dismayed at the encouragement and praise given, without objective critique to other stuff which has merit but noticeable faults in design and execution. Now, if it's OK to praise the one and only make false comment on the other, then this is not a fair forum to have your work or working practices appraised by your peers, mentors or professionals - if that is what you are doing here. 15 minutes of fame can be got elsewhere without the pain of criticism.

For those who only use this forum to contact me; please use my webmail address as I no longer use the messaging service - thanks to UU for it in the past. I have done good business through my contacts here. And for those who are still waiting for the build video, I am shooting part 1 in January. See my website (http://petehowlettukulele.com) or Facebook group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/petehowlettukuleleclub/) for details.

Steveperrywriter
12-09-2013, 07:08 AM
I find this stuff fascinating, and am always interested in hearing from those Who Know How to Do It. I have asked some questions and gotten good answers, and some of my ignorant wonder must have made folks cringe. You speak to a passing parade; having gotten a lot of queries from newbies in my own field, I have come to understand that, and I cut them slack. I have tried to search for the answers here before putting my foot into my mouth, though sometimes that isn't easy. Plug in a search term and you get a broad list that isn't always easy to decipher. After I'd been here poking around for a while, I found a link one of the adepts put up:

https://www.google.co.uk/cse/home?cx=006086160372685481724:y43bmh-bwgc

This dedicated UU Search is easier to drill down and find stuff, and might save everybody some effort.

Steve

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-09-2013, 07:16 AM
I'll be honest... I really don't see how you pros can find the time to post at all when I do the mental math on labor vs. price. The actual labor that goes into some of your ukuleles has got to be very close to the labor required for most custom guitars... but the market will bear a $10,000-$15,000 price tag on the guitar.

Yep- i find guitars and ukes take similarish times- Work time is not represented by the size of the thing being made. Material costs are less though- eg a good Carpathian spruce guitar top is $80, the same wood in uke size is $7.50 (at least from oldworldtonewoods where i buy my Carpathian)


If a question receives reasonable answers before I get to it, I don't see much need to add more. So I don't.

Same for me.
Also, sometimes a new builder has the right answers- just by asking/typing the question they figure out the answer- i know ive done that here plenty of times then just deleted my question without needing to post it.


I appreciated the pros and their patience, but sometimes I was frustrated by replies that basically said, "Go buy a $200 piece of gear or you are not serious and I have no time for you."

There are few bad things about being a good luthier (so i've surmised with empirical evidence through teaching and observing my mentors reactions)- One is that you get asked you the same questions for decades- the same Q's over and over. My old boss got very frustrated when a new student (such as me back in 2003) would query his sound and sage advice learned over 40 years of treading over his own mistakes. When someone like Rick Turner who has been at it for (about) 45 years gives advice, it is backed by such a large body of small incidences and working in the field that it is frustrating to 1) encapsulate and define it all and 2) then have to back it up. It is similar to a math problem you know the answer too but are forced to write out your "workings" for the exam. It is frustrating and mind numbing and to have to defend such things is even more so. Such is what I observed in my teacher tackling the same student questions week after week. I can only surmise it is also true of every other older luthier that appears grumpy or short or at times rude.

This isn't me suggesting that people not ask questions. NEVER be ashamed of not knowing something your new too.
Just understand why some questions get answered the way they do by certain people. Also, this isn't me suggesting people in the know are in the right to be rude, however I will say that to know someone's history is to better understand why someone acts the way they do and to be perhaps less offended by it.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-09-2013, 07:22 AM
I no longer participate here because I feel I have said everything I can say, videoed and published just about everything I have taught my self and am tired of having my honest criticism labelled as rude or otherwise.

Pete- I hope you know that you and your thoughts and comments are greatly missed.

As for saying all that you can say. I doubt it. But if that is indeed the case, then it is time to start saying it to the next generation of builders :)

Hope you come back

rubber necker
12-09-2013, 07:57 AM
Pete- I hope you know that you and your thoughts and comments are greatly missed.

As for saying all that you can say. I doubt it. But if that is indeed the case, then it is time to start saying it to the next generation of builders :)

Hope you come back

I have read most of the threads on this forum and kept on top of Pete and Rick's situation,I would hope that most of the Pro builders can see what happened

I am pretty sure if you were treated like they have been you would not be here either

I wish them well

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-09-2013, 08:31 AM
yer,

Unfortunately, the more you say, the more people can object too.

The Big Kahuna
12-09-2013, 08:49 AM
Now I'm sat here with the iPad waiting for Mrs Timbuck to dish out the beef stew and dumplings

To be honest, if you can't tell the difference between a tablet and a plate, I'm not sure I want one of your ukes any more.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
12-09-2013, 08:57 AM
One of the worst things I've ever done was to put a computer in my shop. It's there primarily so I can listen to iTunes radio but the Internet can be such a distraction. Not only does productivity goes way down, it's murder on your computer. I took the back off my macbook last week and look at all the crap I found in it! It's really better off in a cleaner environment.

HBolte
12-09-2013, 01:05 PM
My father was a pattern maker and wood carver, I grew up with wood dust. It does get everywhere. :D

mm stan
12-09-2013, 08:54 PM
One of the worst things I've ever done was to put a computer in my shop. It's there primarily so I can listen to iTunes radio but the Internet can be such a distraction. Not only does productivity goes way down, it's murder on your computer. I took the back off my macbook last week and look at all the crap I found in it! It's really better off in a cleaner environment.

Imagine how much dust you breathe in your lungs and how they look....

The Big Kahuna
12-09-2013, 08:58 PM
You can buy environmental protection cabinets for computers (I used to sell them in fact). You could probably even build one easily, with a few filters, fans for cooling, a hinged plexiglass front, and run a cheap USB mouse and keyboard out through a gland.

Timbuck
12-10-2013, 12:36 AM
You can buy environmental protection cabinets for computers (I used to sell them in fact). You could probably even build one easily, with a few filters, fans for cooling, a hinged plexiglass front, and run a cheap USB mouse and keyboard out through a gland.
I've used them when I used to install projectors in smoky trendy bars ...without them they soon went dim and packed in..I don't know if the new anti smoking laws would make them redundant these days.........Oops! the thread is drifting:rolleyes:

Hms
12-10-2013, 01:32 AM
Drifting back a little in the general direction.
If you have a wireless network at home, get yourself a network radio!
Should be able to get something not too expensive from Walmart or elsewhere, let that clog up with dust and not an expensive mac!
h

Ken W
12-10-2013, 04:04 AM
Hmmmm....I've read through this thread and have done a fair amount of my own reflection about what this site and the contributors have meant me. My side bender looks a lot like Timbuck's because he took the time to chronicle the design and construction of his bender in this forum...and he gave me some critical feedback when I posted pictures of mine. Thanks, Ken! I probably had the courage to put tool to wood in my first build because of Dave G.'s posts and his build videos...the video of him passing a piece of firewood over a 6" sears jointer had me hooked from the beginnig. Dave also welcomed me into his shop, gave me a set of tenor plans, and accepted some purple heart I sent his way. Thanks, Dave, G! Vic D. also welcomed me into his shop, where we swapped ideas and tools. Thanks, Vic! I've played one of Pondoro's cigar box ukes (very light top, punchy and loud as a canon) and got his feedback on my build #2. Thanks, Mike! I know that build #2 was better because of all of Pete's posts and his videos. My body mold looks a lot like his and I'm still trying to beat his assembly time each time I join the back and top to the sides with my handheld electric drill. Pete's feedback on my neck drilling jig was positive, but he also shot back with adivce to add drill sleeves or mine would soon become sloppy...and he was right. Thanks, Pete! Sven's posts inspire those of us working in small spaces and often prompt me to take a few minutes to sharpen a plane or chisel. Thanks, Sven! Chuck's exceptional work (and friendly, helpful manner) always inspire. Thanks, Chuck! I read Rick Turner's article and saw pictures of his shop in The Fretboard Journal (#25) and thought "I'm learning from that guy!"....well, at least through this forum I am. Thanks, Rick.

O.K....this is really sounding sappy, so I'll bring the rambling to a halt. I could go on and name more, but the point it this - there is a ton of information on this forum that teaches, inspires, encourages, and humbles. Pros and hobbiest alike make this forum what it is: powerful and probably also a bit flawed...but aren't we all?

The Big Kahuna
12-10-2013, 07:18 AM
The entire thread can be condensed into the last post. Well said, that man.

lauburu
12-10-2013, 08:43 AM
there is a ton of information on this forum that teaches,

This is a great forum and it can teach us a lot - if we're prepared to go look for it. I don't have a problem with people's personalities or frustrations shining through - that happens in all families. What does really annoy me are the threads that start off "I am building my first ukulele and want to know what wood to use". It's extremely lazy and an insult to the collective wisdom that this forum attracts.
In my old PC support days we would respond "RTFM" - read the ... manual. Perhaps here we could have a thread entitled RTFF - read the ... forum to which all such posts could be relegated.
Many thanks to the many generous contributors who make this such a brilliant repository of information and inspirational ideas.
Miguel

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-10-2013, 10:33 AM
... contributors who make this such a brilliant repository of information and inspirational ideas.
Miguel

I thought we were all trying for a brilliant suppository of information and inspirational ideas....oh well :uhoh:

New builders will always ask the same questions, on a forum or in a one-on-one building workshop.

As for the search engine- type in "redwood" and you get 20 pages of hits. It is simply easier to ask a new question in the appropriate section. I have no problem with this as it keeps the ball rolling so to speak.

Lets not arrogantly/patronising/or disparaging look down on those with less knowledge.... as that is the great failure of any teacher.

AlaskaTheo
12-10-2013, 11:41 AM
I'm not much of a poster, but I have followed this forum daily for the last couple of years. Building instruments was something that I wanted to do for a long time, It was this forum and it's contributors that helped me to focus on ukuleles. I honestly had a serious under appreciation for the ukulele and was a guitar player for most of my life (I've all but abandoned the guitar for my ukes:)). When I started looking in to all of this, it was Pete's you tube videos that caught me and led me here. I was totally impressed with the quality of posts and discussion, and as I started to learn more about who some of the folks are that post here, I was awestruck that some of you guys were taking the time to answer my questions, even more so when folks had sent me incredibly helpful emails and PMs (Thanks).

I also think that the tone of discussion, often argumentitive and challenging, lends to a lot less BS and can raise the bar of the conversation. It's a delicate act, I think the 'nube do your homework' line 'or the iv'e got x exprerince' or 'your full of it' is important, it helps to maintain quality control. I also thank the kind individuals who respond to the beginners with helpful advise, and those whose wise and compassionate coments help to keep the peace.

I do feel that things have taken a pretty mellow turn around here for some time now, and that conversation has included less nuts and bolts building discussion. That, and we haven't had many arguments lately, kind of like someone needs to start a glue thread or something :). Maybe some of us non-posters should also start piping up, I've had a few questions lately

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
12-10-2013, 12:49 PM
I thought we were all trying for a brilliant suppository of information and inspirational ideas....oh well :uhoh:

New builders will always ask the same questions, on a forum or in a one-on-one building workshop.

As for the search engine- type in "redwood" and you get 20 pages of hits. It is simply easier to ask a new question in the appropriate section. I have no problem with this as it keeps the ball rolling so to speak.

Lets not arrogantly/patronising/or disparaging look down on those with less knowledge.... as that is the great failure of any teacher.

I'm always available to help people, especially those who are really interested in the craft. I do so on a daily basis either though email or with the folks who come by my shop. But if you're lazy in your request than I'm lazy with my reply. Part of the role of being a good teacher is not giving the student the answer but encouraging them to do the research and homework required to understand if the answer truthful or practical to them. Part of the necessary homework is bench time, gaining practical experience. I know for myself that the less time I spend on the computer and the more time I spend at the bench, the better my ukes are.

SeaArtNancy
12-10-2013, 02:04 PM
I've always admired the craftsmanship and skill that I see in this forum and any feedback and guidance is always truly appreciated! You are all an inspiration and thank you all for taking the time to encourage the newbies and weekend warriors!
My very first kit is sitting in my art studio...I'm assembling a tool here and a tool there and will probably start this project once I deliver the oil portrait I just completed. Already am looking at different soundboard woods, the hook is well set! My parrot Franko- who is my studio buddy, is eagerly anticipating any entertaining language that comes with such an daunting learning curve...; )

thistle3585
12-11-2013, 03:43 AM
For me, I consider this to be a "general population" discussion board where people interested in the ukulele discuss topics related to building. Fortunately, there are a few professional luthiers and highly skilled hobbyists that participate too. If I want to learn about being a luthier then I'll go to one of the many luthier forums where there are in depth discussions about the craft itself. I think the expectations of many people that visit this forum are too high and result in a lot of frustration. I just don't see these types of issues come up on a luthier forum. Personally, I have never understood why people feel like they have to post something and simply can't walk away from a discussion they don't agree with. The fact that THIS discussion has been longer than almost any building related thread simply proves my original point. There is more fascination with the politics of the thing than the thing itself. I just don't see that on a luthier forum.

resoman
12-11-2013, 05:02 AM
For me this place has been a wonderful resource. There are things you can learn here that a person could never find in a book. And, I for one am much more interested in the building of the thing rather than the politics of the thing. The politics just get in the way and cloud the real reason we frequent this forum which is (to me) to learn and exchange building information.
So to ALL that have contributed....thank you. My instruments are the better for your contributions.
terry

Ken W
12-11-2013, 07:37 AM
But if you're lazy in your request than I'm lazy with my reply. Part of the role of being a good teacher is not giving the student the answer but encouraging them to do the research and homework required to understand if the answer truthful or practical to them. Part of the necessary homework is bench time, gaining practical experience.

True! Several years before I started building ukes I was hip deep in making a hammered dulcimer for my daughter. Having found very little published on the internet or elsewhere about hammered dulcimers, I sent an email with a few questions to a builder who made a hammered dulcimer for a friend of mine. The swift and concise reply - "Yep, I struggled with those things when I started out too" - sent me (literally and figuratively) back to the drawing board. I finished the thing and it sounds pretty good, but boy was stringing it a pain.

Kekani
12-11-2013, 06:30 PM
Congrats Aaron, Would love to see a pic.

How's about a vid instead? Pale in comparison to your stuff and Crist's winning BIUG People's Choice, but here it is.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vOX1cCfy9s