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Sven
12-10-2013, 10:28 PM
as in shaping a neck with only cutting tools. I will probably give it a quick rub down with fine sandpaper to ease out any carving irregularities but I don't ever use abrasive tools for stock removal or shaping.

Included is a picture of the result, a bit more info about the chosen tools and a couple more pics can be found here:

http://www.argapa.blogspot.se/2013/12/carving-neck.html

And all posts I've bothered to label with "neck carving" can be seen here:

http://www.argapa.blogspot.se/search/label/Neck%20carving

There you will see the jig / holder I use when I carve, I can't recommend it enough.

Please consider the risk involved using sharp knives if you carve freehand - I've gone and bought kevlar gloves for carving wenge and other ridiculously hard species.

Sven

61794

PhilUSAFRet
12-11-2013, 12:33 AM
thanks for sharing

Gary Gill
12-11-2013, 01:07 AM
After sawing the basic shape of the neck, I begin removing material with various files. Next step I use strips (1/2" and 1") of sandpaper or sanding belts like shining shoes. They cut across the grain and form the even arc on the neck. Then it is back to finer grit sandpaper going with the grain. They must be better ways, but this works for me.

Sven
12-11-2013, 01:57 AM
As stated before, it's not about how you remove the wood. It's the wood you keep that makes a uke, inshallah. My way of doing it is fast (after 65 necks) and an excuse for buying nice edge tools. And I like that!

My preference for carving and planing is also heavily influenced by the conditions I work under - my workshop is in my apartment and it's so much easier to clear away shavings from the floor than to control wood dust whirling in the air. Plus my good friend who lives close to me appreciates the shavings and splinters for use in the fireplace, which in turn guarantees me evenings by the fire, complete with cognac.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-11-2013, 06:02 AM
Nice Berg chisel!

Where I used to work in Sydney had a full range of Bergs which was wonderful.

I just started this year to use a small violin knife to pair away around the nut/headstock area. It is now one of my favourite moments in building.

Sven
12-11-2013, 06:41 AM
Damn you've got a keen eye! It's a great tool that chisel, I use it all the time for paring and carving.

Titchtheclown
12-11-2013, 10:00 AM
My favourite shaping knife is made by the swiss army knife people
http://www.kitchenwaresuperstore.com.au/victorinox-shaping-knife-black-handle-p-5993.html?gclid=CJrHmYWGqbsCFYdcpQodqyIAmQ

Available at most good kitchenware stores for under ten bucks.

Chris_H
12-11-2013, 11:43 AM
Those are great knives Titch. Very sharp, and even better because they are disposable (forgive that word!) at that price, and can be sharpened. I fished commercially for a few seasons years back, and bought those knives by the case for use on deck because they are sharp and inexpensive. The serrated version can cut through 1" poly ground line in 1 slice with ease. I have a small stack of them in my kitchen drawer now.

Titchtheclown
12-11-2013, 06:28 PM
Those are great knives Titch. Very sharp, and even better because they are disposable (forgive that word!) at that price, and can be sharpened. I fished commercially for a few seasons years back, and bought those knives by the case for use on deck because they are sharp and inexpensive. The serrated version can cut through 1" poly ground line in 1 slice with ease. I have a small stack of them in my kitchen drawer now.

Any you feel like disposing of can be sent to my place. (Apologies for the thread drift)

Blade tools are usually quicker and cleaner than abrasive tools. Sawdust, or rather sanding dust is quite bad for the lungs as well as being messy.

Michael N.
12-14-2013, 09:17 AM
Good post and my type of approach!
Pretty much the same method that I use for carving Necks. Dangerous (for the Neck!) but the drawknife is a wonderful tactile tool for whittling away the excess material. It has to be high on the list of my favourite tools to use. With the drawknife I can take the dimensions to within around 1 mm of being finished, although I have to go very carefully towards the end. The rest gets finished with one of the Taiwan wooden spokeshaves. I'm not really a fan of using Rasps or files on Necks. I find that they throw me off seeing the actual shape of the Neck developing. The other tools that I use are two large Violin knifes, one of which is 'bellied' or convex sharpened. Such a knife is really useful for shaping the transition from Neck to heel. The whole process reminds me of the approach that some green woodworkers use to carve. Unfortunate but I'm afraid it's virtually impossible not to finish off with sandpaper. At least it is good to minimise it's use.

Sven
12-14-2013, 10:11 AM
Thanks Michael! Nice to know you use the same method and tools.

Sven