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garbel
02-03-2014, 03:19 PM
Hello,
This is my first post. I'm new to Ukulele.

If you have a Ukulele that is strung with a low-g string, do cords change?

e.g. is a F cord still 2010
is an Am still 2000

Just curious more than anything else.

-TIA

coolkayaker1
02-03-2014, 03:27 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJnMMHFGbd0

Chord shapes same, low G and high G. Enjoy

Famous (mostly) high G players: Jake Shimabakuro, Aldrine Guerrero, Gerald Ross, James Hill, Kalei Gamiao.

Famous (mostly) low G players: Taimane Gardner, Brittni Paiva, Kimo Hussey, Herb Ohta, Jr.

garbel
02-03-2014, 05:15 PM
Thanks for the response ... learned a lot!

vanflynn
02-03-2014, 05:25 PM
Welcome to UU. Glad you joined us. It's personal taste and the subject of many a thread!

Enjoy your uke and keep us posted

TheCraftedCow
02-03-2014, 09:19 PM
Would you believe they are both the same and different? Middle C on a piano is our C string (#3).A major chord is the 1, the 3 and the 5. 1c-2d-3e-4f-5g-6a-7b-8c. Cmajor is c-e-g. that is called a root chord. If you want to plant an apple tree, you plant an apple seed. The tree comes up from the root. When the position is e-g-c, it is called a first inversion.
When the position is g-c-e, it is called a second inversion. Yes, they are all the same notes, but the different positions produce a different sound. When one has a low g string, it is 5 half steps below middle C. Playing a C chord as 5-4-3-3 gives a root C chord, because the lowest note is the root note of C. In reentrant ,0-0-0-3 has g higher than the c,C, so it is a second inversion structure. There are times and reasons why each string gets to be the first or last to be heard. Yes, this is technical. We have no idea...you probably have yet to realize how great of a player you will become. To tell you as a blanket statement that the two stringing produce the same chords is really only partially correct. There is another stringing where the G is low and the A string is replaced with another low G string pulled up to an A tuning. Yes, the chord shapes will be the same, but the sound of the notes in the sequence they fall makes a big difference. Once you begin chord solo playing, you will see how different structuring of the same three notes makes a song easier in one of the three positions. [I am intentionally not explaining the 3rd inversion now]

PeteyHoudini
02-04-2014, 06:29 AM
I find that my songs arranged on a high G don't sound the same on the low G. I have to modify them to make them sound better. Likewise the other way around. I tend to add some melody notes in my arrangements and they can fall often on the first string and the 4th (G). So, the type of high or low G makes a difference. I would stick to the high G when learning the uke.

Low G is good for playing those low notes for classical melodies. I have one low G uke and I like using it for classical music.

Petey

Jon Moody
02-04-2014, 06:40 AM
Hello,
This is my first post. I'm new to Ukulele.

If you have a Ukulele that is strung with a low-g string, do cords change?

e.g. is a F cord still 2010
is an Am still 2000

Just curious more than anything else.

-TIA

The chords shapes stay the same, but the voicing changes to a more open sound because of the tonality of the low G.