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AcousticMonster
01-31-2009, 11:48 AM
Hey guys!

I come from a guitar background and was taught to play scales using the "Three Notes Per String" method. I've been searching around the web but can't seem to find a complete guide on ukulele scales using this method. So I figure I would try to start my own.

Here is what I've come up with so far. Below are JPG's showing the Major, Natural Minor, Major Pentatonic, and Minor Pentatonic scales (in standard C ukulele tuning). I tried to write all in the key of C, but written the Natural Minor scale in the key of A. I've done this to show you how it corresponds to the major scales. To play them in another key just slide the "Root Note" up or down the neck, and all the patterns will move up or down as well. If you have any questions, or see that I made a mistake please let me know.

Thanks!

Edit: I edited the image and pdf links to redirect to my new website ( http://www.acousticmonster.com). I'm working on newer higher resolution versions of these patterns in Adobe Illustrator, and will be making those available at some point in the near future.

YouTube Major Scale Tutorial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBE_wRpQq1k&feature=PlayList&p=60DF4FB6EB3C4F75&index=2

YouTube Major Scale Tutorial - Using Them (quick tutorial): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bIgNsKYJrVE

Edit: Added the scales to a .PDF file. Here is the link: Ukulele Scales 3-Note-Per-String Method.pdf (http://www.acousticmonster.com/pdf/US3NPSS.pdf)



http://www.acousticmonster.com/image/FreeStuff/Major.jpg



http://www.acousticmonster.com/image/FreeStuff/MajPen.jpg



http://www.acousticmonster.com/image/FreeStuff/Minor.jpg

benmealer
01-31-2009, 12:26 PM
very nice. i've been looking for something like this. thanks.:cheers:

AcousticMonster
01-31-2009, 01:56 PM
You're welcome!

lisaxy424
01-31-2009, 09:11 PM
Now I just need to find the time (and patience!) to learn this well - thanks so much for posting them! :)

Link
02-01-2009, 01:49 AM
Well done. Nice and simplified without compromising any information. I love me some major scales. Amazingly easy to come up with good melodies while just dinking around with them.

Ukulele JJ
02-01-2009, 06:11 AM
Schweet!

:cheers:

JJ

therimidalv
02-01-2009, 03:44 PM
Thank you so much sir!!!! I know this was said but I have been looking so long for this. I found other scales but it didn't give me that versatility I wanted. Thanks again man!

russ_buss
02-01-2009, 04:01 PM
this is a great resource! thanks for sharing this Danny. :)

AcousticMonster
02-01-2009, 07:34 PM
Thanks again guys. I've been working on the other scales today, but with the Super Bowl didn't get too much done. I will be added additional cheat sheets as soon as I can. :shaka:

khrome
02-02-2009, 01:02 AM
Cool! I've been looking for something like this too.

pete1030
02-02-2009, 05:26 AM
Thanks, nicely done, it will be helpful.
Pete

Ukulele Friend
02-02-2009, 06:19 AM
Aloha AcousticMonster,

Just wanted to say, 'Mahalo' for the uke scales. This is just what I was looking for (and needed) to practice. :)

best,
Shawn

http://ukulelefriend.com

AcousticMonster
02-06-2009, 03:15 PM
Hi everybody. I've made some changes to the first cheat sheet, and added a second. The JPG's now show the Major, Natural Minor, Major Pentatonic, and Minor Pentatonic/Blues scales. I'm going to work on getting the Harmonic and Melodic minor scales up next. Please stay tune! :p

AcousticMonster
02-14-2009, 09:00 PM
I just added the the chart for the Harmonic and Melodic Minor scales. I think these are correct, but let me know if they are aren't. Thanks guys!

SLOuker
02-20-2009, 12:25 AM
Wow.. these are great! Thanks!

Sayyadina
02-20-2009, 12:48 AM
Very nice! Thanks alot for this. It's just what I needed.

Ben-jamming
02-20-2009, 05:11 AM
mahalo mate:D

Aloha Matty
03-02-2009, 10:09 AM
Excellent work!!! Thanks!!! :shaka:

AcousticMonster
03-02-2009, 10:31 AM
mahalo mate:D


Excellent work!!! Thanks!!! :shaka:

You guys are welcome!

PaulGeo
03-02-2009, 11:01 AM
Great stuff.
Does everyone memorize these or is there some other "short cut" way that I'm not understanding? Sorry... newbie here to music theory :)

AcousticMonster
03-02-2009, 05:46 PM
Great stuff.
Does everyone memorize these or is there some other "short cut" way that I'm not understanding? Sorry... newbie here to music theory :)

Paul, don't worry about memorizing all the patterns right away. Just take one pattern and play it till you get use to it. Then learn a pattern which is next to the one you learned. Eventually you will get use to moving between the patterns by soloing, or playing melodies.

If you have a way of recording, I would record yourself playing some chords (in the key of the scales). Then play back the chords and play the scales over top of them.

SuperSecretBETA
03-02-2009, 06:15 PM
Nice. I didn't use the three notes method. Looks easier than the way I did it though. I just learned the pentatonic boxes and later built the rest of the scale of out those boxes. What are Harmonic and Melodic Minor Scales, though?

AcousticMonster
03-02-2009, 07:59 PM
Nice. I didn't use the three notes method. Looks easier than the way I did it though. I just learned the pentatonic boxes and later built the rest of the scale of out those boxes. What are Harmonic and Melodic Minor Scales, though?

They are used mainly in Jazz music. But, you can use them with various chord progressions to get a European/Gypsy sound. It just depends what chords you play in the background.

There are some other scales besides these, but I haven't had the time to work on them. The ones I have at the start of the thread are going to be your bread-and-butter scales. There are odd ones like Whole-tone, Diminished, Chromatic, etc. Then there is Modes...and that's a whole other animal to tackle. :D

Weshwee
06-01-2009, 03:45 PM
how do you read/play thhat??????:confused: :confused:

Kanaka916
06-01-2009, 03:54 PM
how do you read/play thhat??????:confused: :confused:
See post #1 for the link to the tutorial . . .

smoothice
06-01-2009, 04:47 PM
AWSOME!!!

I just started learning the guitar (well its been almost a year). And I have been working on scales a bunch. Besides trying to learn all the scales I have been trying to learn 2nd's, 3rd's, 4th's, 5th's, etc, etc, up to 8th's.

I'm still in the whole "Oh My God there is too much to learn" mode. But once you do it over and over again you begin to see how it all relates and intertwines with itself.

Anyways. I was just thinking of asking about scales and here it is.

This place rocks :nana:

AcousticMonster
06-01-2009, 05:20 PM
AWSOME!!!

I just started learning the guitar (well its been almost a year). And I have been working on scales a bunch. Besides trying to learn all the scales I have been trying to learn 2nd's, 3rd's, 4th's, 5th's, etc, etc, up to 8th's.

I'm still in the whole "Oh My God there is too much to learn" mode. But once you do it over and over again you begin to see how it all relates and intertwines with itself.

Anyways. I was just thinking of asking about scales and here it is.

This place rocks :nana:

Hi smoothice! Yes, just go to the first post. I've recorded a quick video on Youtube and the link is in the first post. You play scales on the ukulele just like you would on guitar. The patterns are just different.

TokyoUketarist
06-06-2009, 09:03 PM
I like your charts alot. Good work. My only input would be that when you start on a note that is not the root you are actually playing a mode. Like your 1st position scale start on G and continues to D. If you made it go to G you would have the G Mixolydian scale. I think when you explain the Major scale people don't realize all the modes are also there too! Like the 2nd position starting on A gives the A natural minor scale.

TokyoUketarist
06-06-2009, 09:13 PM
Once you learn all the notes in 1 major scale you've actually memorized 7 modes! So there is a cheat when you realize that the scales are related to each other(same notes).
The C major scale also contains; D dorian, E phrygian, F lydian, G mixolydian, A aeolian(minor) and B locrian. You've got to learn the major scale the hard way (practice) but the others come easily!

AcousticMonster
06-07-2009, 04:47 PM
I like your charts alot. Good work. My only input would be that when you start on a note that is not the root you are actually playing a mode. Like your 1st position scale start on G and continues to D. If you made it go to G you would have the G Mixolydian scale. I think when you explain the Major scale people don't realize all the modes are also there too! Like the 2nd position starting on A gives the A natural minor scale.

Hi, yes I know modes. I just never covered that part. Thanks for explaining it for peeps!

By playing certain chord progressions this aids in modal sound as well.

UkeNukem
06-08-2009, 03:45 AM
Those are fantastic charts, thanks. I've used the same thing for guitar and it really helps. For the folks just seeing these for the first time, my advice is to play the scales and watch how the chord notes fall within the scales. Maybe even play a chord then the scale that matches and then if you are starting on a note other than the root you can get the sound. You'll have to play them a bunch but you will get the tones in your head and then will not have to think about the patterns.

casetone2514
06-08-2009, 04:00 AM
Very useful jpegs. Thanks

mangouker
06-12-2009, 10:33 PM
where are the charts?

grappler
06-12-2009, 10:42 PM
go to the first page of this thread!

I still dont get all this im bad with theory

Captain_Lovehandles
06-29-2009, 03:48 PM
I missed this until now. Thanks for the scales. I'm looking forward to finding some useful stuff there.

built
06-29-2009, 04:52 PM
is it my computer or has the jpeg been removed?

Kanaka916
06-29-2009, 05:05 PM
Still there . . .

AcousticMonster
06-29-2009, 05:24 PM
I missed this until now. Thanks for the scales. I'm looking forward to finding some useful stuff there.

You're welcome CL. :shaka:


is it my computer or has the jpeg been removed?

Built, go to the beginning of the thread, the charts are still there.

AcousticMonster
07-03-2009, 02:42 PM
Hi all,

A couple people were asking me how to use the scales. So I made another quick tutorial on where to start. This is more for beginners, but hopefully it is informational for all! I added the video link my first post. Enjoy!

Danny

cornfedgroove
09-04-2009, 03:32 AM
Alright, here's my disclaimer so you can understand where I'm coming from. My ADHD kills me when something looks "busy", I just cant do it. So understand that

**also it would help me if you explained the relation of all the modes to the major scale. I never learned scales until I played a mountain dulcimer, and thats only because its fretted diatonic in D major scale (I guess). So what is the cheat? I actually fine it easier to learn all the single string scales as it helps me understand the intervals and the box scales.

That WWHWWWH thing was the best thing ever for my finicky mind. So if someone took the various scales and said.
Major Scale: WWHWWWH
Minor Scale: blah blah blah
Pentatonic: blah blah blah

Then I could memorize them all pretty quickly on the single string and then move that to the box scales.

***also explain the reason for playing in different positions on the same scale

anniekate76
09-28-2009, 01:30 PM
That WWHWWWH thing was the best thing ever for my finicky mind. So if someone took the various scales and said.
Major Scale: WWHWWWH
Minor Scale: blah blah blah
Pentatonic: blah blah blah

Then I could memorize them all pretty quickly on the single string and then move that to the box scales.


Okie dokie. These W-H patterns are actually written under each of the diagrams posted on the first page of the thread.

Major Scale: WWHWWWH
Minor Scale: WHWWHWW
Major Pentatonic Scale: W W W+H W W+H
Minor Pentatonic Scale: W+H W W W+H W

(That W+H means a whole and a half, or 3 half steps. Pentatonic means it's a five note scale)

notnick
10-05-2009, 07:41 PM
Thank you!!!!!!

AcousticMonster
10-06-2009, 03:02 AM
Thank you!!!!!!

You're welcome!

UkuleleHill
10-07-2009, 12:45 PM
Now I just need to find the time (and patience!) to learn this well - thanks so much for posting them! :)

Same here... :)


Well done. Nice and simplified without compromising any information. I love me some major scales. Amazingly easy to come up with good melodies while just dinking around with them.

Main reason I want to learn them!

Ken
10-08-2009, 10:53 AM
I just went outside and jammed out for almost half an hour just playing around with this 3 string method. Thank you very much for creating this, I think I'll find it easier to solo in the key of C now :D.

AcousticMonster
10-08-2009, 11:11 AM
I just went outside and jammed out for almost half an hour just playing around with this 3 string method. Thank you very much for creating this, I think I'll find it easier to solo in the key of C now :D.

Your welcome. You can use the patterns in any key. ;)

spazus_maximus
10-15-2009, 01:57 AM
Thanks for posting this man!

Is there anywhere I can get these as a pdf? I try to copy & paste the pics but they get fuzzy when i make them larger.

AcousticMonster
10-15-2009, 02:31 AM
Thanks for posting this man!

Is there anywhere I can get these as a pdf? I try to copy & paste the pics but they get fuzzy when i make them larger.

I'll see what I can do. I had to make these using Photoshop because I couldn't find any other program to make these in. I'll see if I can put them in a PDF.

buddhuu
10-15-2009, 03:16 AM
I'll see what I can do. I had to make these using Photoshop because I couldn't find any other program to make these in. I'll see if I can put them in a PDF.

Photoshop will save to PDF. The (free) Open Office (http://www.openoffice.org/) word processor will too. :)

http://www.openoffice.org/

buddhuu
10-15-2009, 03:23 AM
Oh, and great job on the scale charts, BTW. :cheers:

AcousticMonster
10-15-2009, 08:57 AM
Oh, and great job on the scale charts, BTW. :cheers:

Thank you.

AcousticMonster
10-15-2009, 03:41 PM
Well...I've added the scales to a PDF file. Is there anyway I can upload the file to Ukulele Underground so I link it for everyone to use? I don't have any web storage at the moment.

Kanaka916
10-15-2009, 04:36 PM
Well...I've added the scales to a PDF file. Is there anyway I can upload the file to Ukulele Underground so I link it for everyone to use? I don't have any web storage at the moment.
Check your PM . . .

buddhuu
10-15-2009, 11:37 PM
Mods, please consider making this thread sticky?

AcousticMonster
10-16-2009, 06:17 AM
I emailed Seeso on possibly have UU upload it to their site. If they do I'll add a link to the PDF at the beginning of the thread.

seeso
10-16-2009, 09:53 AM
I emailed Seeso on possibly have UU upload it to their site. If they do I'll add a link to the PDF at the beginning of the thread.

Why don't you just upload it to box.net? That's where I've been hosting my UU-related PDF's and MP3's.

AcousticMonster
10-16-2009, 11:16 AM
Why don't you just upload it to box.net? That's where I've been hosting my UU-related PDF's and MP3's.

I've uploaded it to box.net. Can you guys try and download the file to see if work right? I just opened a free account so I'm not sure if that was the way to go.

Ukulele Scales 3-Note-Per-String Method.pdf (http://www.box.net/shared/amlgs0q2h6)

seeso
10-16-2009, 11:58 AM
I've uploaded it to box.net. Can you guys try and download the file to see if work right? I just opened a free account so I'm not sure if that was the way to go.

Ukulele Scales 3-Note-Per-String Method.pdf (http://www.box.net/shared/amlgs0q2h6)

It works for me, dude. Edit your first post with that link.

Kanaka916
10-16-2009, 12:18 PM
Same here, works just fine. BTW, I've not had any problems with free storage.

badgerwolf
11-01-2009, 03:26 AM
this is brilliant! thankyou

rogue_wave
11-14-2009, 06:20 PM
Thank you for posting these, and an even bigger thanks for the "how to" vids. As someone with no music theory at all, this is a huge help. I have added 20 minutes of working on these scales to my daily practice. It is starting to help me learn the notes on the fretboard as well as really understand whats happening when I make a chord.

Good work, thank you.

AcousticMonster
11-24-2009, 06:41 AM
this is brilliant! thankyou


Thank you for posting these, and an even bigger thanks for the "how to" vids. As someone with no music theory at all, this is a huge help. I have added 20 minutes of working on these scales to my daily practice. It is starting to help me learn the notes on the fretboard as well as really understand whats happening when I make a chord.

Good work, thank you.

Wow, I just realized my thread got stickied! Sa-weet.

Badgerwolf/Rogue_Wave...sorry for not responding earlier, but you're welcome.

jrsp12
02-09-2010, 04:49 PM
Sorry for the noobie question: On the Major Scale (Ionian) in C Major (1st Pos) - According to the "Playing Notes" - you should start on the open "C" and end on the "C" 1st String 3rd Fret (Correct?). But what is the black dot on the 1st string 5th fret (D note) and the black dots on the 4th string for (Open G, A, B)????
Sorry for the elementary question but I have no musical education and am a little confused as to how to play the scale according to the diagram (I did watch the tutorial but am still a little confused.) Thanks for any help in advance!

jrsp12
02-09-2010, 05:04 PM
I think I figured it out. Disregard my previous post.

poppa uke
02-10-2010, 06:07 AM
oh why do I sooo love the UU? because of beautiful people such as you and the FINE tutorials and info freely givin' !!!! thanks for the info....the ukulele is more addictive than heroin!! maybe even nicotine!! :>}
cccc'cain't wait to practice!!! thanks again.

AcousticMonster
02-10-2010, 06:17 AM
oh why do I sooo love the UU? because of beautiful people such as you and the FINE tutorials and info freely givin' !!!! thanks for the info....the ukulele is more addictive than heroin!! maybe even nicotine!! :>}
cccc'cain't wait to practice!!! thanks again.

You're welcome. Sadly, I need to practice these myself. lol

Sic_Rob
02-18-2010, 09:58 AM
I just found this thread but I can not wait to get home to look at the How to Vid's. I only know the standard
1 3
1 2 4
1 3 4
scales. I am very anxious to see the 3 not scales. Thanks. From what I read here, you obviously did a great job. Thanks for the hard work.

AcousticMonster
02-19-2010, 05:22 PM
I just found this thread but I can not wait to get home to look at the How to Vid's. I only know the standard
1 3
1 2 4
1 3 4
scales. I am very anxious to see the 3 not scales. Thanks. From what I read here, you obviously did a great job. Thanks for the hard work.

You're welcome. I really want to do some more tutorial videos...but it's hard finding the time.

velvetsiren
02-28-2010, 11:05 PM
an old thread but i just wanted to add my two cents worth.

i find it interesting that you explain the patten whole whole half etc, i always learnt it as tone tone semitone tone tone tone semitone. same thing different words. i know that in the US music notation has different names to europe and traditional music language, like quarter note, being a crotchet, as a music educator i find the half not quarter note to be a really good way to teach the idea of note duration, children seem to get confused when you start saying crotchets minims and semibreves, but when you split it into fractions like whole note half note quarter note etc, it is easier for them to understand as they are already learning that stuff in numeracy at school.

scales are a really important to learning an instrument, for a number of reasons, it helps you understand the relationship between keys, also your udnerstanding of harmony and a whole heap of other things, like the modes that were discussed earlier. modes are really interesting, on a technical side they give the player skill in moving around their instrument. when i studied piano i had to learn all major harmonic minor, melodic minor, chromatic scales, and natural minor too, also had to do scales in thirdsand sixths, arpeggios, contrary motion. scales are a very important part to learning an instrument, they are like excercises. that being said i rarely practice scales these days on any of the instruments i play but what i know about them helps me with any instrument i pick up. but mostly it helps with knowing your relationships between scales, like 1 4 and 5 are primary chords, and then you have all the other secondary chords, all that harmony musical theory is really valuable to know, but you need to know yoru scales first to be able to apply all the harmony stuff, like A minor is the relative minor key of C. they are relatives as they share the same key signature which is no sharps or flats, g major has 1 sharp f# and its relative minor key is e Minor as it only has 1 sharp f# but technical it has two because the 7th note is always raised in a harmonic minor scale - (following the pattern tone semitone tone tone semitone tone and a half semitone. e F# g a b c d# e )

and then there are the special chords, the diminished, augmented, Neapolitan sixth and augmented 6th, all that fun stuff, that takes heaps to get your head around. but great for song writing and transpositions, etc

anyway probarly rambled enough about music theory. thanks for the charts btw.

velvetsiren
02-28-2010, 11:13 PM
also would like to add that the melodic minor scale has the raised 6th and 7th notes on the ascending but on the descending they are played as naturals. which is the same as the natural minor scale

AcousticMonster
03-01-2010, 02:47 AM
an old thread but i just wanted to add my two cents worth.

i find it interesting that you explain the patten whole whole half etc, i always learnt it as tone tone semitone tone tone tone semitone. same thing different words. i know that in the US music notation has different names to europe and traditional music language, like quarter note, being a crotchet, as a music educator i find the half not quarter note to be a really good way to teach the idea of note duration, children seem to get confused when you start saying crotchets minims and semibreves, but when you split it into fractions like whole note half note quarter note etc, it is easier for them to understand as they are already learning that stuff in numeracy at school.

scales are a really important to learning an instrument, for a number of reasons, it helps you understand the relationship between keys, also your udnerstanding of harmony and a whole heap of other things, like the modes that were discussed earlier. modes are really interesting, on a technical side they give the player skill in moving around their instrument. when i studied piano i had to learn all major harmonic minor, melodic minor, chromatic scales, and natural minor too, also had to do scales in thirdsand sixths, arpeggios, contrary motion. scales are a very important part to learning an instrument, they are like excercises. that being said i rarely practice scales these days on any of the instruments i play but what i know about them helps me with any instrument i pick up. but mostly it helps with knowing your relationships between scales, like 1 4 and 5 are primary chords, and then you have all the other secondary chords, all that harmony musical theory is really valuable to know, but you need to know yoru scales first to be able to apply all the harmony stuff, like A minor is the relative minor key of C. they are relatives as they share the same key signature which is no sharps or flats, g major has 1 sharp f# and its relative minor key is e Minor as it only has 1 sharp f# but technical it has two because the 7th note is always raised in a harmonic minor scale - (following the pattern tone semitone tone tone semitone tone and a half semitone. e F# g a b c d# e )

and then there are the special chords, the diminished, augmented, Neapolitan sixth and augmented 6th, all that fun stuff, that takes heaps to get your head around. but great for song writing and transpositions, etc

anyway probarly rambled enough about music theory. thanks for the charts btw.

Thanks V for the info. I hope my charts help out.

bigploch
03-01-2010, 07:54 AM
Wow... I get it. super excited about going home and trying it out. Great tutorials! Thanks!

bigploch
03-01-2010, 10:42 AM
Ok well I am home now and am stumped. How do I know where to start and stop? Can you number these? Even if it is rough, I can do a clean version. I was thinking of re doing these larger for those with less than excellent eye sight.

DWUke
07-13-2010, 05:51 AM
For 1st position (C Major), what fingers do you use on the left hand?
For 2nd, etc. position, what fingers do you use on the left hand?

AcousticMonster
07-13-2010, 06:30 AM
For 1st position (C Major), what fingers do you use on the left hand?
For 2nd, etc. position, what fingers do you use on the left hand?

It depends what pattern it is, but I try to use the same system. Look at pattern #3 on the C Major scales. From the top string (G string) it would be: index finger, middle finger, pinky finger. The next string down (C string) it would be the same fingers. On the next string down (E string) I use: index finger, ring finger, pinky finger. And finally the A string I use the same pattern. Use the reverse order in going back down the scale.

In cases like pattern #4 where you have whole step patterns, I use: index finger, ring finger, and pinky finger.

For scales like the pentatonic #3 I use: index finger, ring finger (on G string), index finger, pinky finger (on C string), index finger, pinky finger (on E string), and index finger, ring finger (on A string).

When you are picking, make sure you pick in a Down-Up pattern. Don't just pick Down, or Up. I've seen a lot of self taught players make this mistake. You will increase your picking speed by picking Down then Up. It may take some getting use to, but in the long run you will get it.

If you are playing without a pick I would suggest looking up the rules for Classical style picking. Or maybe someone on here would give you advice in that system of picking.

AcousticMonster
07-13-2010, 06:35 AM
Ok well I am home now and am stumped. How do I know where to start and stop? Can you number these? Even if it is rough, I can do a clean version. I was thinking of re doing these larger for those with less than excellent eye sight.

Hi, sorry I missed this post. I'm currently working on redoing these in Adobe Illustrator. I have the patterns done, I'm just working on the text portion.

malihini2some
07-16-2010, 05:21 PM
AcousticMonster, I have question or two which have puzzled me for some time. I think I have thought it through, but obviously not enough. Your video is perfect example of my difficulty. You use a chord progression of C,F,G and Dm. Playing the C maojor scale over all these chords sounds fine. What I don't get is why the B flat in F and Dm, and the G sharp in the G chord don't clash with the C major scale. I've been practicing progressions and changing to the scale of the chords key. Is that a mistake? What is the difference in the two approaches?

AcousticMonster
07-19-2010, 02:37 AM
AcousticMonster, I have question or two which have puzzled me for some time. I think I have thought it through, but obviously not enough. Your video is perfect example of my difficulty. You use a chord progression of C,F,G and Dm. Playing the C maojor scale over all these chords sounds fine. What I don't get is why the B flat in F and Dm, and the G sharp in the G chord don't clash with the C major scale. I've been practicing progressions and changing to the scale of the chords key. Is that a mistake? What is the difference in the two approaches?

Please see my PM response.

The most basic explanation is that every note within the the C scale can be found within one of the chords itself. To be more specific, the root note of the chord. The root note is the starting point of the chord, and defines its name.

Here is a link that shows the chords in detail: http://www.cyberfret.com/theory/chord-construction/basic/index.php

malihini2some
07-19-2010, 10:46 AM
Thanks for your help AM. I guess what was confusing me was that when playing a C scale over these chords the relevant scales that the chords themselves are built on are not important above the fifth. That kind of threw me for a loop. I did some hunting around on the internet and found that bebop musicians would switch to the the scale of the chord's root. Not that I am going to become a bebop player in this lifetime. Aloha.

AcousticMonster
07-19-2010, 10:57 AM
Thanks for your help AM. I guess what was confusing me was that when playing a C scale over these chords the relevant scales that the chords themselves are built on are not important above the fifth. That kind of threw me for a loop. I did some hunting around on the internet and found that bebop musicians would switch to the the scale of the chord's root. Not that I am going to become a bebop player in this lifetime. Aloha.

Wait till you start getting into "Modes". I'll let the smarty pants Jazz guys explain those to ya, lol.

malihini2some
07-19-2010, 06:19 PM
This is some pretty cool stuff, and I think I have learned a lot in the last week. In the past I played quite complex stuff, but I played in "parrot" fashion. In future I'm going to make a list of all the notes in the chords of a piece and see what scales will fit. Awesome!

AcousticMonster
07-21-2010, 03:48 AM
This is some pretty cool stuff, and I think I have learned a lot in the last week. In the past I played quite complex stuff, but I played in "parrot" fashion. In future I'm going to make a list of all the notes in the chords of a piece and see what scales will fit. Awesome!

You don't have to do that. You just need to understand Music Keys, and the Chord Progressions within the Keys.

For major scales the format would be:

Major Minor Minor Major Major Minor Diminished


For playing in Minor Keys it would be:

Minor Diminished Major Minor Minor Major Major

So for the Key of C Major you could play any of these chords, and it would sound good with the C Major scale:

Cmaj Dmin Emin Fmaj Gmaj Amin Bdim

Just remember to start playing with the C major chord to maintain the key.

You might have noticed that the minor scale looks like the major scale, accept it starts on the sixth chord and follows the same chord progressions. That is because a minor scale is a variation of the major scale. In other words, A minor is the direct counterpart to the C major scale.

So the A minor chord progression would look like this:

Amin Bdim Cmaj Dmin Emin Fmaj Gmaj

Here is a basic look at the "circle of fifths" wheel:
http://www.improvhq.com/pic/circle.gif

AcousticMonster
08-04-2010, 05:05 PM
Hi guys. I edited the image and pdf links in the original post to redirect to my new website ( http://www.acousticmonster.com). I'm working on newer higher resolution versions of these patterns in Adobe Illustrator, and will be making those available at some point in the near future. I'll let you know when I have those completed.


Danny

RobbieBoy
08-05-2010, 08:49 PM
Thanks for the work and post.
I did this for mandolin, and I used excel. It was pretty easy once I did the first one. Might save you some time as opposed to using Illustrator...

AcousticMonster
08-06-2010, 02:52 AM
Thanks for the work and post.
I did this for mandolin, and I used excel. It was pretty easy once I did the first one. Might save you some time as opposed to using Illustrator...

See my email reply. I've got all the patterns done in illustrator, I'm trying to write some text to explain how they are used. I suck at writing so that's whats taking so long. :(

I also plan on making a ukulele chord bible at some point. I don't like most of the chord charts I've found on the net. They are either incomplete, or they don't show root notes, and etc.

bigploch
08-06-2010, 07:47 AM
See my email reply. I've got all the patterns done in illustrator, I'm trying to write some text to explain how they are used. I suck at writing so that's whats taking so long. :(

I also plan on making a ukulele chord bible at some point. I don't like most of the chord charts I've found on the net. They are either incomplete, or they don't show root notes, and etc.

Cool deal. Danny. Waiting with high anticipation. Great work thus far and an awesome site. Keep it up!

-Dan

Papi
11-08-2010, 03:07 AM
Very nice thread. Extremely informative moving from guitar to Uke!

Sincere Thanks !

AcousticMonster
11-08-2010, 05:29 AM
Very nice thread. Extremely informative moving from guitar to Uke!

Sincere Thanks !

You're welcome, I'm glad I could help. I would recommend watching the UU University videos as well. Those guys have a lot of information there too.

greyflood
11-28-2010, 10:34 PM
it is so helping me to find the tone or the scale aah thanks :D

rerrett
01-27-2011, 08:24 PM
Monster, This looks like it was a lot of effort and has helped a bunch of people, thanks for putting it together! My question is, should I ditch the major scale pattern I learned for this one?

The one I learned matches the one aldrine talks about in uke minutes 103
http://ukuleleunderground.com/2010/10/uke-minutes-103-the-box-part-2/

I'd like to be able to improvise and I guess learning the scales from this thread are more flexible than the 'box' pattern right?
Thanks!

AcousticMonster
01-28-2011, 03:37 AM
Monster, This looks like it was a lot of effort and has helped a bunch of people, thanks for putting it together! My question is, should I ditch the major scale pattern I learned for this one?

The one I learned matches the one aldrine talks about in uke minutes 103
http://ukuleleunderground.com/2010/10/uke-minutes-103-the-box-part-2/

I'd like to be able to improvise and I guess learning the scales from this thread are more flexible than the 'box' pattern right?
Thanks!


Hi Rerrett,

I looked at that video, and he is basically playing the same notes at the open position as in my 1st pattern; but for some reason he is not playing the notes on the G string. I'm not sure why though. I have to admit I've only watched a few of their videos. :(

The patterns are just a learning tool so you can figure out how the notes fall into place on the neck. Scales are made up of tones (some people, like me, call them steps). To play a "whole step" place your finger on the C note on the bottom string. Then move your finger up two frets and play the D note. That is called a "whole step". To play a "half step" place your finger back on the C note. Then move your finger down one fret to the B note. This is a "half step". That's all scales are, a series of half steps and whole steps.

In the case of the Major Scale the notes flow in this order: Whole Step, Whole Step, Half Step, Whole Step, Whole Step, Whole Step, and a Half Step. This is also represented by: W--W--H--W--W--W--H. In the case of C Major the notes would be C, D, E, F, G, A, B, and C (the octave).

There really isn't a "best system" to playing scale patterns. Use whichever pattern system that helps you learn the easiest. I prefer the system I learned (the three note per sting method), but others may prefer Aldrine's box system. The important thing to learn is how the notes flow together in tones (or steps).

In the end, once you figure out the tones (or steps) your not going to use every single note within a certain position anyways. When soloing your going be jumping to different position on the neck - using three notes here, bending notes there, and etc. Hopefully my ramblings make sense, lol. Let me know if they don't.

rerrett
01-28-2011, 07:38 PM
Thanks for the clarification AMon! Great stuff!

clouded
02-09-2011, 03:32 AM
these scales are the best!
I just learned some of them and would like to mess around with them.

Any tips?

maybe some cool blues solo tab or something like that?

UkeToaster
09-20-2011, 09:16 AM
Very cool for people that want to learn like that! I particularly don't play scales like that because going from c4 to c3 back to c4 sounds rather weird in my opinion. I think playing from the C string is a more fundamental way to play/understand a scale because you start on a lower root, and finish at the octave.

Example:
G
C
E
A

C Major Scale: (1 octave)

-------------------
-0-2--------------
-----0-1-3--------
------------0-2-3-

Also with this method, it is much easier to visual chords and intervals as well as soloing patterns because the C, E, and A strings go from lower to higher, thats why i normally don't touch the G string when it comes to soloing, its more of a "support note."

Hopefully my explanations weren't terribly hard to understand, i had trouble putting these ideas into words that people of all skill levels could take away from.
Thanks for listening

UKEON TERRITORY
12-21-2011, 04:19 AM
Very helpful post . but one question . GOT MORE SCALES ?
OH! And thanks tons for the .pdf file .

AcousticMonster
12-21-2011, 06:40 PM
Very helpful post . but one question . GOT MORE SCALES ?
OH! And thanks tons for the .pdf file .

You're welcome RD! Unfortunately, I haven't got anything else at the moment. I've been working on guitar stuff, so haven't been playing uke in a while.

PhilUSAFRet
08-29-2012, 05:46 AM
Me too, thanks for sharing

etf
04-21-2013, 08:48 AM
Hi, just found this thread through another post. When I click on the link for the PDF is just says, Page not found. Has the link been removed?

Brother7
08-24-2013, 09:09 AM
At last no more searching and not finding! Cheers.

mistydoo
06-24-2014, 08:55 AM
Thank you so much, this is perfect.

dave p
01-28-2015, 04:54 AM
Hi Guys,

Does anyone have a printable version of these scales as the link is no longer active?

TIA

Dave

dave p
01-29-2015, 01:46 AM
Hi Guys

Worked out how to print, really cool stuff.

Thanks.
Dave

Robin Harrison
10-26-2016, 02:25 AM
Same question for me............link doesn't link to a pdf .
Any help.
Thanks

Robin Harrison
10-26-2016, 01:13 PM
Well, thank you.
I think read from #1 to #56 and resumed at #58 !
Many thanks
Robin

lelouden
01-19-2017, 07:42 AM
Is there an update to this thread. None of the links will open for me in the OP :/

The YT links do work but the scale link and the website won't open on my computer. Is anyone else having that problem?

I am able to get to the scales from post # 57 but Im not sure if that is all of the scales from the OP.

strumsilly
01-19-2017, 02:24 PM
the files are ?not found? so the the links are not working

ukatee
01-20-2017, 04:55 AM
This is the link on post 57: https://app.box.com/shared/amlgs0q2h6 but haven't watched the videos to see if he covers more scales

kypfer
01-20-2017, 06:15 AM
This is the link on post 57: https://app.box.com/shared/amlgs0q2h6 but haven't watched the videos to see if he covers more scales

Thanks for posting that link ... I must admit to having not found it when I looked :o