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View Full Version : Any Bodhran Players out There?



PhilUSAFRet
02-20-2014, 02:25 PM
I just purchased a like-new, used Remo 14" deep shell bodhran online. It will replace the Pakistani one I learned on a few years ago. I can't wait to play a decent one and hear those deep, deep bodhran tones. They seem to be getting a little of a reputation as a "world drum" and are being used for several genres including country, jazz, and I think they sound great with some of the South American music, especially from the Andes. I like them because my old hands can't bang on a drum head much any more, so I like using a stick.

hokelore
02-21-2014, 05:08 AM
I still play an old tourist model that I bought in a record shop in Dingle in the '80s. Nothing fancy, but I always liked the way it sounds. As far as playing style goes, I listen to, and imitate, the old timers.

PhilUSAFRet
02-21-2014, 11:27 AM
I have a decent DVD and have found many great channels on YOuTube that provide lessons on the bodhran at all levels. I hope to get good enough to sit in some open mic's at a local pub.

igorthebarbarian
02-21-2014, 07:58 PM
Pics please?!

PhilUSAFRet
02-21-2014, 10:35 PM
I got a killer deal on this one:

64094

DaleR
02-22-2014, 09:29 AM
I have a whole fleet, but this one is the king!

64109

igorthebarbarian
02-22-2014, 11:38 AM
Dale R & PhilUSARet - those are cool. Would they be fairly easy (for someone like my wife) to pick up and have a little fun with?



I have a whole fleet, but this one is the king!

64109

PhilUSAFRet
02-22-2014, 01:33 PM
That's a big'un Dale. Igor, that's a tricky question. I want to say yes, it is "easy", and it isn't "mandatory" that one use it for Irish music, but if one does, and doesn't know the correct beats for a given type of song (reels, etc.), and an Irishman hears her, he may not be very happy she is playing. That being said, many many how to play bodhran tutorials on youtube. She would be able to get a very good idea if she might like it. The right size bodhran and beater (stick) would also make a difference. It does take a little practice, but if she has a good sense of rhythm, shouldn't be hard. Here's the bodhran fiveos on my youtube page:

http://www.youtube.com/feed/SCXOP3ixU0JrnshUmPhF4Phww-6h7Q4tBlsW2bzRkRwAcQ

igorthebarbarian
02-22-2014, 06:36 PM
Thanks for these video links Phil!


That's a big'un Dale. Igor, that's a tricky question. I want to say yes, it is "easy", and it isn't "mandatory" that one use it for Irish music, but if one does, and doesn't know the correct beats for a given type of song (reels, etc.), and an Irishman hears her, he may not be very happy she is playing. That being said, many many how to play bodhran tutorials on youtube. She would be able to get a very good idea if she might like it. The right size bodhran and beater (stick) would also make a difference. It does take a little practice, but if she has a good sense of rhythm, shouldn't be hard. Here's the bodhran fiveos on my youtube page:

http://www.youtube.com/feed/SCXOP3ixU0JrnshUmPhF4Phww-6h7Q4tBlsW2bzRkRwAcQ

DaleR
02-23-2014, 07:19 AM
Jigs: groups of three, Reels: groups of two. You need to see it done and it really is not that easy. But, it is fun to play! Just get one and see if you like it or not-- could be the best $60 you spend!

PhilUSAFRet
02-23-2014, 09:07 AM
Been thinking about your question Igor. If Irish music isn't your primary interest, I think your wife might get more use out of a frame drum. They are very versatile and used for many types of music. Doesn't involve sticks (in case you piss her off). If she can tap out a beat with her hand and fingers, they this may be the way to go. Can even get a bodhran beat going by rocking the thumb and hand on the head. They are priced cheaper than a decent bodhran and are way better than a crappy one. Great prices at Musician's Friend. http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=remo%20frame%20drum%20renaiss ance&sm=1

They run from 8" to 22" and are available through most Remo dealers. Here's Musician's Friend's selection. Note the free shipping when comparing prices. You'll also find some on ebay:

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/drums-percussion/remo-world-wide-pretuned-hand-drum

igorthebarbarian
02-23-2014, 03:42 PM
Gaaaaah Phil! I was leaning maybe towards a Cajon, or Bongos even, but these Frame Drums are cool too. The 22" sounds really cool especially at :40 in:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwHZMePP6Jg

The good thing is they all look fairly "affordable". It looks like I could start a hand-drum collection easily.



Been thinking about your question Igor. If Irish music isn't your primary interest, I think your wife might get more use out of a frame drum. They are very versatile and used for many types of music. Doesn't involve sticks (in case you piss her off). If she can tap out a beat with her hand and fingers, they this may be the way to go. Can even get a bodhran beat going by rocking the thumb and hand on the head. They are priced cheaper than a decent bodhran and are way better than a crappy one. Great prices at Musician's Friend. http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=remo%20frame%20drum%20renaiss ance&sm=1

They run from 8" to 22" and are available through most Remo dealers. Here's Musician's Friend's selection. Note the free shipping when comparing prices. You'll also find some on ebay:

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/drums-percussion/remo-world-wide-pretuned-hand-drum