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kwall
03-03-2014, 11:28 AM
Hey There,

my theory is AWFUL so I thought I would ask my silly question here.

If I were to play with my two friends who both play guitar do I have to transpose? like if i play a C chord and they play their C chord will it be ok? or do I have to reshape it due to the difference in tuning?

thanls

Camsuke
03-03-2014, 11:30 AM
It's the same.

kwall
03-03-2014, 12:28 PM
thank you very much :)

Louis0815
03-04-2014, 01:38 AM
Never mess up the chords with the fingering.

A chord is a defined group of notes - this is what you hear. This is independent from the instrument.

Fingering is the way you "produce" these notes on your instrument - this is what you do.

Bookworm
03-04-2014, 07:14 AM
What about the strum pattern? Do you play a song differently with other people than you do when you're just playing by yourself?

SailingUke
03-04-2014, 08:13 AM
What about the strum pattern? Do you play a song differently with other people than you do when you're just playing by yourself?

It is recommended you play the same tempo and rhythm as others.

Bookworm
03-04-2014, 08:17 AM
Thank you!

mailman
03-04-2014, 10:08 AM
Never mess up the chords with the fingering.

A chord is a defined group of notes - this is what you hear. This is independent from the instrument.

Fingering is the way you "produce" these notes on your instrument - this is what you do.

That is a wonderful way of explaining this. I may just steal this, for future use....:)

OldePhart
03-04-2014, 10:33 AM
It is recommended you play the same tempo and rhythm as others.

This is, of course, good general advice and especially for beginners. However, if you're just playing with a couple of friends and you play together often enough to be comfortable doing more than "robot strumming" you can often make a much more interesting sound if one counterpoints the rhythm of the others (tempo, obviously, has to be the same even when doing this).

For example, instrumentally the most interesting part of the Everly Brother's tunes was when one would do triplets or a broken rhythm for a measure or two while the other strummed straight and so on.

John (just stirrin' the pot) :)

Ukejenny
03-04-2014, 04:22 PM
That is a wonderful way of explaining this. I may just steal this, for future use....:)

I agree, it is a great explanation!

Ukejenny
03-04-2014, 04:23 PM
This is, of course, good general advice and especially for beginners. However, if you're just playing with a couple of friends and you play together often enough to be comfortable doing more than "robot strumming" you can often make a much more interesting sound if one counterpoints the rhythm of the others (tempo, obviously, has to be the same even when doing this).

For example, instrumentally the most interesting part of the Everly Brother's tunes was when one would do triplets or a broken rhythm for a measure or two while the other strummed straight and so on.

John (just stirrin' the pot) :)

I love duple against triple! Such a cool feel to it.