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peaceweaver3
03-10-2014, 12:10 PM
I've struggled for a tactful way to ask this and I don't think there is one. :o So, with apologies, how do you fund uke purchases?

Couple of options:
Cash in hand (or account as it were)
Credit card
Seller's payment plan
Selling other instruments or things beforehand
Post-purchase "yard sale"
Some other method?

I'm thankful to say I got my most recent uke with ready cash. That felt good, because I've either put them on a credit card or used a payment plan before.

And those of you who want to share?F

ksiegel
03-10-2014, 12:24 PM
If I can't pay for it, I don't buy it - as simple as that.

I may use a credit card, but it gets paid off in the subsequent billing cycle.

We get tips weekly at Starbucks, and I make sure that any dollar coins that get tossed in the tip jar are part of my tips. (No one else wants the weight, anyway.) The coins then go into the dome from a stack of CDs, and I just cut a slot on the top (I can see the contents). And I leave it alone. (I have to - it gets pretty heavy, pretty fast.)

The year my father-in-law passed away, we came home after 3 weeks of caring for him to find the refrigerator had crapped out. I paid for the new one from that fund.
Last year, when I needed to put a new electrical service on the house before the solar panel installation, the down payment from the electrician came from that fund.
I paid for my Donaldson custom ukulele from that fund.

As long as the soda machines, car washes, and postal vending machines in this area keep giving dollar coins as change, I have a ukulele fund. I only get 5-10 per week, but it adds up.

So that's how I buy new ukes. I'll be counting the coins soon - there's a resonator I'm thinking about.



-Kurt

SailingUke
03-10-2014, 12:43 PM
I sold two kids and 3 grandchildren as well as a few brats that were in neighborhood. ;)

Most of my purchases were from disposable income. I do keep money from teaching and gigging as well as any instruments I sell for the instrument fund.

janeray1940
03-10-2014, 12:47 PM
As someone with only three ukes I hardly can say I have UAS, but - I've got a really strict "if the cash isn't there, don't buy it" rule (with ukes and just about every other non-emergency in life). The company I work for gives annual bonuses, and this year I'm planning to fund a uke with mine, as I have done in previous years. Last year, sadly, said bonus funded major repairs on my 15-year-old car...

Another player I know just bought a new uke and told me that it's what she does with her tax refund each year, which I thought was a pretty good plan.

OldePhart
03-10-2014, 01:41 PM
I've purchased a couple of instruments on the devil's coin (credit cards) when there was a really good deal and I didn't have ready cash but new I could afford to pay it off if not immediately then pretty quickly. Most of the time though I try to just spend "surplus" cash - and that used to be fairly easy because I hadn't had a car payment in years and the rest of my debt is pretty light. I finally had to replace my wife's car last September so I have a payment again - not a terribly high one but it's still going to cut into the surplus funds.

I do have a lot of instruments (ukes and guitars) that don't get played enough. I should sell them but listing them for sale is such a pain that I probably won't do it until and unless I reach a point where I really need to start thinking about cash flow.

I sometimes get annual bonuses and this is one of those years. That should pay for most of the Boat Paddle 5-string tenor I have on order. My secondary sources of income have pretty much dried up so I'm getting tax refunds again the last couple of years - those have funded my last couple of trips to UWC and probably will again this year.

Everybody has priorities and I accepted long ago that mine are different from those of many others. I make decent money in my job but my home and cars (even the new one) are quite "below my station" if you will. I'm fine with that because a home is just a place to park my butt when I'm not somewhere else and a car is just a way to take my butt from home to that somewhere else. I simply refuse to have a house or car payment that is so large that it runs my life. I've got friends who make substantially less than I do who are working 60 hours a week to pay for a beautiful home for their ex and kids to fight over. :)

John

Hippie Dribble
03-10-2014, 01:42 PM
I don't have a credit card and never will. I have limited income so I always need to sell one (or sometimes two) in order to fund my next purchase. That said, living off tap water and rice helps.

Doug W
03-10-2014, 01:46 PM
You've got me thinking....

I sold two kids and 3 grandchildren as well as a few brats that were in neighborhood. ;)

Most of my purchases were from disposable income. I do keep money from teaching and gigging as well as any instruments I sell for the instrument fund.

Doc_J
03-10-2014, 01:50 PM
It helps to not have other expensive hobbies. I've cut back on golf, scuba, and driving (car pool saves me $30 per week).
I pack my lunch (it's healthier and less expensive).

Then buy some, and then sell some. You'll sell some you wish you hadn't, but you'll find some wonderful instruments.

actadh
03-10-2014, 03:28 PM
I have a yearly contract. That is part of the household money for utilities, car payments, insurance etc.

I teach at a state school so the pay isn't particularly huge, but it is the best job I have ever had and it always blows me away that I get paid to do what I love.

I teach overload every semester, I teach in the summer, and I teach over holiday break. That money is for my obsessions.

kohanmike
03-10-2014, 04:00 PM
Since starting to play over seven months ago, UAS got me good and I've accumulated 8 ukes (one on the way), but all at highly discounted or Asia prices. They each sell for average of $350, and my average cost was $150, that's part of what motivated me to buy. I also don't have credit cards, but I do use a debit card that's only good for the amount of money in the bank.

I retired a couple of years early last year, Social Security and work pension, but the thing that opened up my cash flow considerably was signing up for the new health care, which cut my Kaiser cost from $860 to $270 a month. I also manage my mother's three apartment buildings, which means I don't pay rent, and that helps a lot as well.

Up until now I've been restricting my price for a uke to under $200, but now that I'm getting better, I'm thinking of taking a step up in the next few months for a $600-700 high quality ready built. Down the road I'm looking at inheriting the three apartment buildings with my two brothers, splitting the rental income, which should double my income, that might be when I go for a custom build.

connor013
03-10-2014, 04:08 PM
I'm with Kurt -- my tips go into the uke/beer fund.

Interestingly, with two (young!) rugrats, I'm too damn tired most nights to do any proper drinking. Hooray for a growing uke fund!

Edited to add: I'm also a sometimes believer in the one-in-one-out program.

KevinV
03-10-2014, 04:55 PM
I keep my tastes within the boundaries of my pocketbook and order when the urge arrives. It's usually pretty infrequently, but when it does come, it's mostly in doubles or triplicate. Then I'm good for another year or so.

dismount
03-10-2014, 05:43 PM
I try to get the best sound for the cash (disposible income to a point.) If I get too much cash wrapped up in a uke, I feel guilty about spending it and I don't enjoy it as much.To me its all about enjoyment. I have about 25 ukes that are all under 300.00 except for 2. If I can get a 1000.00 sound out of a 150.00 vintage I'm happy. I buy when I feel the need and have xtra cash. No credit!!

Icelander53
03-10-2014, 06:14 PM
If I can't pay for it, I don't buy it - as simple as that.




-Kurt

words of wisdom.

Freeda
03-10-2014, 06:28 PM
I have a sugar daddy. He pays cash.

Dan Uke
03-10-2014, 06:32 PM
It's either my wife's Roth IRA or buy another uke...I haven't funded my wife's IRA since starting the uke. :p

katysax
03-10-2014, 07:24 PM
If I don't have cash I don't buy it. Sometimes I institute a rule that if something new comes in something old has to go out. Not so much to raise cash as to reduce the amount of possessions.

wickedwahine11
03-10-2014, 07:26 PM
I usually fund my ukes with sales of others, supplemented by savings and gifts, for example one of my ukes was an anniversary present. Luckily, my spouse is having a midlife crisis and buying a motorcycle. In exchange, I will get equal funds from the household account for a new uke.

JamieWG
03-11-2014, 07:10 AM
If there's something I want then something else has to go.

That's what I do too; otherwise there'd be waaaaay too much instrument hoarding going on around here!

Olarte
03-11-2014, 07:19 AM
For me, for better or worse I was outsourced from my 22+ year IT job two years ago. Ironically I still do the same thing for the same company under a different master. But in any case I got a decent severance package.

So after 22+ years,I figured I deserved a reward and grabbed a couple of grand for myself before handing over the rest of the package over to credit\bank and home improvements. It's not like it was a golden parachute... I got a decent amount but after 22 years, it was only a portion of what the execs that sold us out like fodder got to line their own pockets...

In any case, That's how I was able to get a nice collection of the more expensive ukes, 3 Koalohas My Myamoe etc..

I also bought a $500 vitamix blender which I love but would never had spend that kind of cash on... if it weren't part of my severance package.

As for the rest of the collection and other instruments.

I save a small portion of my pay for discretionary expenses and try to save whatever petty cash I can find.

Luckily most of my other ukes are in the 200-300 dollar range, and to be honest I already have way too many so I think I; about done with UAS.

Although as much as I'm running out of room, there is always room for one more.

I play most of them on a regular basis, and for some reason I can't seem to be motivated enough to sell any of them...

But at 52, I'm happy with my music journey and having these wonderful instruments at my beck and call, including my classical guitar, a new electric piano and the Cricket violin... I would not trade all this even for a nice Sports car or a cruise.

I get to play music each and every day! life is good and you need to make yourself happy as long as it's reasonable and you can meet all your other responsibilities.

SailQwest
03-11-2014, 07:38 AM
I've funded my UAS in various ways...commissions, gratuities, special occasion purchases, gift money, one-in-one-out, etc. I've also received a couple of ukes as gifts. My husband's ukes were all gifts from me.

Five Ways
03-11-2014, 11:03 AM
Dont drink, dont smoke, save hard.

sam13
03-11-2014, 11:12 AM
I am on straight commission.

I use purchasing a new Ukulele as a reward. When I sell $x,xxx then I get a new Uke.

It is very motivating.

OldePhart
03-11-2014, 11:25 AM
I sold two kids and 3 grandchildren as well as a few brats that were in neighborhood. ;)


Now there's a thought...I have a lot of grandkids..."Hey, Jerry, make me a 5-string baritone to match the tenor..." LOL

John

strumsilly
03-11-2014, 11:59 AM
I have a sugar daddy. He pays cash.

Ha, I have a sugar momma. I've bought distressed and /or underpriced ukes, fixed them up and sold them, and worked my way up to some nice ones.

Ukulele Eddie
03-11-2014, 12:10 PM
I separated from my prior firm last summer and have been looking for a niche manufacturing company to buy and doing some advisory work to augment my search. Since I have mostly "outcome" instead of regular "income" right now, I need to keep what I have invested in Ukes to a reasonable amount. I had a rare opportunity to buy a new, highly coveted Uke recently and had to pass on it. It was very difficult, but I could not imagine looking my wife in the eye and trying to justify the expense, especially since I just incurred several very large, unexpected expenses (rebuilt a transmission and replaced a furnace in two weeks - ouch!). If was single at the time, I would have said screw it, and went ahead with it. But I'd rather have a happy wife and once less Uke than vice-versa. ;-)

So as I've posted elsewhere, for the time being I am limiting myself to 2-3 Ukes and will be flipping in and out of Ukes (Rotating Uke Program) so that I can experience a wide variety these next couple of years. When my financial situation returns to where I'm accustomed, I may find myself with 4-5 really nice Ukes on hand at any one time. Even if I could afford more, I don't think I could ever justify many more than that because I would feel guilty that I'm simply not using some of them enough to justify having them. Accordingly, I think I will always have a RUP to some degree.

Lastly, I am an avid cyclist (and racer). I have been purposely selling old / little used equipment both to reduce clutter and to create goodwill with my wife. I just sold my Cordoba 35TS and bought an almost new KoAloha Super Concert at a slightly higher cost. Since I just sold $1,600 worth of cycling stuff, my wife doesn't complain about a relatively minor incremental cost. She sees the joy that I derive from this unexpected new obsession and she is supportive. I just try to keep balance so that she doesn't have a reason to stop being supportive.

guitharsis
03-11-2014, 02:25 PM
If I buy one, sell one. Keep upgrading and have a really nice collection now. Love the K brands. They each have their own unique qualities.

JJFN
03-12-2014, 08:41 AM
Whats UAS?

Shady Wilbury
03-12-2014, 08:46 AM
Ukulele Acquisition Syndrome. :)

good_uke_boy
03-12-2014, 09:11 AM
Play-a-way.

coolcow
03-12-2014, 09:36 PM
I sold two kids and 3 grandchildren as well as a few brats that were in neighborhood. ;)

hmm...I think i should start making babies now....lots of them...

OldePhart
03-13-2014, 03:23 AM
Play-a-way.

Okay...I just got this...made no sense to me at all when I read it yesterday...

Guess I'm a little thick between the ears this week...

John

bborzell
03-13-2014, 05:47 AM
After many years of buying guitars and mandolins, I'm at a point where buying ukes is as simple as selling off what I don't play as much and moving a uke in to replace it. That said, I currently have what I want from a playability standpoint. About the only thing that tempts me currently is the esthetics of the hybrid wood Compass Rose listed in the classifieds (although it also sounds very good).

I also pay for stuff with Amex, either directly or through Paypal, because Amex doubles the warranty for new stuff and goes to bat for card holders when transactions go into the toilet better than any other card company. I can vouch for that statement several times over. The fact that Amex is a 30 day payment turnaround ensures that anything I buy is the same as cash up front. They recently sent me something about utilizing a new revolving Amex feature and I said "thanks, but no thanks".

CTurner
03-13-2014, 06:51 AM
After reading through the thread, I would have to say that the accumulation of "ways to pay" pretty much describes how I've been buying/selling/affording my stable of ukes. In the end, the pleasure of ukes that you really enjoy playing make the real cost quite small.

Dan Uke
03-13-2014, 07:01 AM
I still find the buy one / sell one answer interesting as each person decides when this starts. You hardy see anyone owning one uke use this technique but rather someone who owns several ukes. What is everyone's number? I plan on never owning more than six ukes at any time and I currently own 3. ;)

I agree with CTurner...the cost of the uke is relatively small to the amount of joy I get from that uke.

janeray1940
03-13-2014, 08:35 AM
What is everyone's number? I plan on never owning more than six ukes at any time and I currently own 3. ;)


I've been steady at 3 for a few years now, and that number is about to increase to 4 (tomorrow!) - and frankly, I'm a little uncomfortable about that. I've always thought 3 was the perfect number - one reentrant, one low G, one spare - but I certainly don't see myself re-homing any of them. And there's a potential 5th on the horizon later in the year, so, I'd better start getting comfortable with that number :)

All of that to say - things change, never say never, and nothing is certain. Six really does seem to me to be a good maximum though, as it will allow for dedicated ukes for various purposes (reentrant/low G, different sizes or woods, different shapes, resonator/banjo/whatever, etc) but still isn't really out of control.

guitharsis
03-13-2014, 09:14 AM
Six seems to be a good maximum number for me too.

Gillian
03-13-2014, 04:32 PM
Like others have said, I pay for my new ukes by selling others that I don't play much anymore.

Plus I promised myself and my husband that I wouldn't screw any more uke hangers in my uke room wall. Six is enough.

coolkayaker1
03-13-2014, 04:35 PM
i mow lawns

Ukejenny
03-13-2014, 04:37 PM
I'm okay at the "buy one" method, but haven't gotten the hang of "sell one". I play a lot of instruments and teach lessons on wind instruments, so I have quite a few instruments around besides my ukuleles. I save up my own money from teaching lessons. Birthday/anniversary/Christmas gift ideas are good, too. I don't have expensive ukuleles at this point. I keep a uke stash hidden in the house. I put cash in it here and there. When I get curious, I count it and try to decide what to do with it. Right now, my clarinet and flute both need overhauls, which makes me sick. I could buy a really nice uke for what those two will cost.

Luke El U
03-13-2014, 04:56 PM
Like others have said, I also don't smoke or drink. I live and work overseas where no car is needed - haven't had one for 13 years now. Paying wholesale prices at NAMM-like events here in China also helps a great deal!

drbekken
03-14-2014, 12:37 AM
So far, all my ukes have been very, very cheap....except for my Martin OXK, which actually cost some money. That instrument is good, so I don't think I will be buying another uke in a long time.

NewKid
03-14-2014, 01:12 AM
A lot less golf, and no more golf trips.

notgeorgeformby
03-14-2014, 01:44 AM
You can always turn to crime, but not everyone has the stamina for a high speed cop chase. Alternatively….

Build your own. Do don't really need all that furniture, now do you?

Sell your organs. You don't really need TWO kidneys/lungs/eyeballs, now do you?

Swap your uke collection with that of a fellow uke enthusiast. To benefit fully from this arrangement choose someone with a much larger and better collection than yours. You will get some new and different instruments to play, which should damp down your UAS for a while and when it returns repeat the whole process.

If you don't fancy that, get a good friend to hit you repeatedly on the head with a cricket bat until you pass out unconscious. When you come round with any luck you'll have some degree of amnesia. This is when you can rediscover your uke collection as if you've never seen it before. Of course there is always the danger you will suffer such brain damage you can't play any more, but it's a risk you have to take.

sonomajazz
03-14-2014, 05:30 AM
Mostly just buying and selling here...looking for the "perfect" uke. With a Collings and Mya-Moe in the house, one would think I'm "done"...but actually thinking about selling my Goodall to fund further uke madness!!

Lori
03-14-2014, 06:26 AM
I still find the buy one / sell one answer interesting as each person decides when this starts. You hardy see anyone owning one uke use this technique but rather someone who owns several ukes. What is everyone's number? I plan on never owning more than six ukes at any time and I currently own 3. ;)

I agree with CTurner...the cost of the uke is relatively small to the amount of joy I get from that uke.
Choosing a perfect number for a ukulele collection is difficult. Each size has it's own properties, and wood types and low g, and amplified. Well I guess that is why I have so many. Besides the fact I like the way they look. I don't think I would seriously put a limit on my hobby based on a random number. There will always be the exception that might come along, and I wouldn't want to pass it by.

That said, funding for the collection is helped by not owning a house, no kids, and a grateful elderly mother. In addition, my early Uke Leash earnings fueled my collection (when I still had my "day job"). These days though, I consider Uke Leash to be my main source of income.

–Lori

Concertina
03-14-2014, 06:36 AM
I have it bad...and I've only been playing for a little over a year now.

I never buy on credit (Bill me Later with Paypal only...but that gets paid off every two weeks). It's not just that...I don't buy anything on credit...I'm way too irresponsible for that crap.

I've worked for GameStop for 11 years...so I get paid pretty well, I have very few bills, paid off my car, no credit cards etc...so I only pay for insurance, cellphone and mortgage. The rest of my money is mine. I also sell stuff on Etsy which helps when I can't really justify spending money on something...if I have a little extra in my Paypal account...it's like getting a discount.

So far, I've bought most of my ukuleles on eBay at discounted prices, either used or factory second. You'd be surprised what people will mark down for...I don't care if there's a scratch or something as long as it sounds good...that just gives it character!

I also have relatively no other "fun" expenses. The boyfriend and I go to Dungeons & Dragons conventions (we are super nerds) but that doesn't usually cost a lot. I have a lot of art supplies that I've amassed when money was plentiful so I don't buy that regularly...my makeup habit is well stocked (that stuff is EXPENSIVE!!!)...and my sport of choice is running, which has little to no cost associated with it. Once you buy good shoes, you are done. :)

Appalachian picker
03-14-2014, 07:02 AM
Lucky for me I've not been afflicted with UAS. (I'm not a collector by nature.) I have one baritone uke and one 6-string guitar and I'm satisfied with that!

But I do have other potentially expensive passions.....bicycle riding (titanium bikes and carbon bits cost $$$$$) and fly fishing can certainly drain a fund!

I'm of the mindset too....that if I don't have the cash then I don't buy it.

stevepetergal
03-14-2014, 07:45 AM
Blood bank.

OldePhart
03-14-2014, 03:14 PM
...But I do have other potentially expensive passions.....bicycle riding (titanium bikes and carbon bits cost $$$$$) ....

So that's how they keep you at it, bits in the mouth, like a horse, I always wondered. Why carbon, though? LOL - I really knew what you meant but this was too good to pass up!

John

Appalachian picker
03-17-2014, 06:18 AM
So that's how they keep you at it, bits in the mouth, like a horse, I always wondered. Why carbon, though? LOL - I really knew what you meant but this was too good to pass up!

John

Oh man....don't even get me started on horses. My wife has a horse that I call a "hole in the air that I throw money into."

Booli
03-19-2014, 05:39 PM
get a good friend to hit you repeatedly on the head with a cricket bat until you pass out unconscious. When you come round with any luck you'll have some degree of amnesia. This is when you can rediscover your uke collection as if you've never seen it before. Of course there is always the danger you will suffer such brain damage you can't play any more, but it's a risk you have to take.

I'm sorry, but this is the funniest thing I read today and made me laugh so hard I fell out of my chair.

In my case (in the USA), I'd probably substitute a ball-peen hammer for the cricket bat.