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View Full Version : Vintage Martin - reglued bridge ?



jimhuang
03-30-2014, 05:34 AM
hi folks,

just got a 1960s martin style O with original case. all original with a great martin sound. but i found the bridge is likely been re-glued at some point. not quite sure . any help ?

65349

thanks in advance.

Jim

jimhuang
03-30-2014, 05:37 AM
sorry for the duplicate post..

Mattyukaholic
03-30-2014, 08:08 AM
I'd say yes, definitely. You can see the glue residue.

As long as intonation is good I wouldn't worry about it. It's how they sound that's important IMHO.

OldePhart
03-30-2014, 08:27 AM
It's been re-glued and not very well. It's rough enough to affect collector's value but as Matty says, if intonation is good and it's stable it should be a good player. I've got some pretty rough looking ukes but as long as they play well that's all I really care about.

John

FrankB
03-30-2014, 08:54 AM
The good news is, it can be redone if it bothers you. www.frets.com/FretsPages/Luthier/Technique/Ukulele/ReglueUkeBridge/reglueukebridge.html
The bridge won't come off as easily as the one in the link above, but it shouldn't cost too much at all to have it done properly. I'd be careful about scraping that glue off to clean it up. Sometimes that sort of thing creates more problems. ;)

OldePhart
03-30-2014, 09:23 AM
The good news is, it can be redone if it bothers you. www.frets.com/FretsPages/Luthier/Technique/Ukulele/ReglueUkeBridge/reglueukebridge.html
The bridge won't come off as easily as the one in the link above, but it shouldn't cost too much at all to have it done properly. I'd be careful about scraping that glue off to clean it up. Sometimes that sort of thing creates more problems. ;)

Very good point about the scraping! I'm no expert and OP if you really want expert advice on how to repair it you might post something in the luthier's forum here. However, even I know that you don't want to scrape at globs of glue like show on the back of that bridge - depending on the type of glue and the original finish you can pull up whole strips of finish and even wood!

If you're concerned about collector value, or playing something that's a little visually rough bothers you, I recommend letting a professional remove the bridge and do a proper restoration. They have the experience to figure out what kind of glue was used in the previous amateur restoration and how to remove it without doing further damage to the uke.

John

ukantor
03-30-2014, 11:08 AM
If the intonation is good, my advice would be to leave it alone. The re-glued bridge is part of this uke's life story. We all have our imperfections, scars, and blemishes. I'm not ashamed of mine - well, I wish I'd looked after my teeth!

If you are concerned about its re-sale value, consider how much it would cost to have the job done properly, against how much that would add to the value of the uke. I think that would convince you just to play it and enjoy it.

OldePhart
03-30-2014, 01:36 PM
One last thing...if it were mine... (when reading the following, keep in mind that I am not a vintage collector type person...I play my ukes and value performance above all else).

That said, if it were mine and I liked the way it played I would probably convert it to a string-through-top by drilling small holes at the saddle end of the string slots, straight down through the top and the bridge plate underneath. You push the strings in from the top, fish them out the sound hole, tie a knot and then pull them up tight. This way you don't have to worry about whether the bridge is going to pop again with modern strings (modern strings tend to have a bit higher tension than old ones) or because the previous repair job was not well done.

I know, some of the vintage fans are cringing, and if you do this don't ever take the uke on "Antiques Roadshow" :)

Just for the record, though. If I ever do happen to find a vintage uke I really like and buy it...I will probably be converting the bridge to a string-through-top even if it is pristine. So there, vintage fans :p

John

jimhuang
03-30-2014, 03:24 PM
you guys are amazing ;-). thanks for all the replies.

yes the intonation is good, just visually bad around the bridge. some minor residue. just concerned about the stability by such a reglue work...:(

jimhuang
03-30-2014, 05:56 PM
hey thanks John & Frank,

yes, i was trying to clean it but soon i found it might cause some damage. i guess i would leave all things as is .

ukantor
03-30-2014, 09:09 PM
No need to worry about the stability of the re-glue. If it pops off, you should consider it an opportunity to have the job done properly. If it stays put, that's good too.

coolkayaker1
03-31-2014, 12:18 AM
One last thing...if it were mine... (when reading the following, keep in mind that I am not a vintage collector type person...I play my ukes and value performance above all else).

That said, if it were mine and I liked the way it played I would probably convert it to a string-through-top by drilling small holes at the saddle end of the string slots, straight down through the top and the bridge plate underneath. You push the strings in from the top, fish them out the sound hole, tie a knot and then pull them up tight. This way you don't have to worry about whether the bridge is going to pop again with modern strings (modern strings tend to have a bit higher tension than old ones) or because the previous repair job was not well done.

I know, some of the vintage fans are cringing, and if you do this don't ever take the uke on "Antiques Roadshow" :)

Just for the record, though. If I ever do happen to find a vintage uke I really like and buy it...I will probably be converting the bridge to a string-through-top even if it is pristine. So there, vintage fans :p

John

That was an epic thread--one of those rare, truly memorable threads bc you taught us all something new--when you did the drill thru string conversion on that uke, John. Thanks again for that.