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WashAshore
03-31-2014, 12:34 AM
I just read that a Stradivarius viola is expected to fetch forty five million dollars a Sotheby's auction!
That got me to thinking about what the world's most expensive Ukulele would sell for. Would it be a
Martin 5K?

johns777
03-31-2014, 12:43 AM
Taylor makes one that costs $9,999.99. Doh! Just realized that that's a set. http://www.guitarcenter.com/Taylor-Limited-Edition-Builders--Reserve-Series-IV-Guitar-Ukulele-Package-107624082-i2431031.gc

Icelander53
03-31-2014, 01:57 AM
what makes a ukulele worth ten grand?

RAB11
03-31-2014, 02:05 AM
It'd probably have to be made from the same tree that provided the wood for Iz's coffin, if ther was any left...

RichM
03-31-2014, 02:54 AM
Once you get up to five figures, you are typically looking at rarity and collectability driving price. Vintage Martin 5Ks tend to start around $10K and go up, due to the fact that there aren't that many of them and they are in high demand.

Price is ultimately always based on supply and demand. For a pricey new musical instrument, a very small percentage of that is tied up in the materials. Most of what you're paying for is the time, experience, and skill of a top-notch luthier. In the mandolin world, top builder like Steve Gilchrist and Lynn Dudenbostel command $25K and up for a new instrument and sell everything they build. Are they worth it? Clearly they are, since there are a lot of people willing to pay it.

coolkayaker1
03-31-2014, 04:18 AM
Wasn't there a new DeVine that was in Pua Pua for $18k a while back?

aquadan
03-31-2014, 04:20 AM
A 1931 national style 2 uke recently went for $13,500 on ebay.

Skinny Money McGee
03-31-2014, 04:34 AM
I just read that a Stradivarius viola is expected to fetch forty five million dollars a Sotheby's auction!
That got me to thinking about what the world's most expensive Ukulele would sell for. Would it be a
Martin 5K?

There's three vintage 5k's on ebay right now that aren't selling, and one is listed at 7450.00. He had it listed at 6895.00, a while ago, and it didn't sell then either.

ichadwick
03-31-2014, 05:30 AM
My next ukulele will be the world's most expensive, according to my wife. It will cost some parts of my body I've grown rather fond of, over the years....

UkerDanno
03-31-2014, 05:37 AM
If Iz's favorite uke wasn't cremated with him, it would probably be the world's most expensive ukulele!

janeray1940
03-31-2014, 05:39 AM
A few years ago there was a Gibson Poinsettia uke that went on eBay in the same ballpark as that National mentioned above.

FWIW - the folks at the shop where I play have pointed out that ukes over $2000 or so almost *never* go to players, mainly to collectors to hang on their walls. And as anyone who has ever been into vintage "anything" knows, collectibles are only worth what someone will pay for them, leading to some pretty arbitrary values.

UkerDanno
03-31-2014, 05:43 AM
this is the most expensive ukulele on ebay...
http://www.ebay.com/itm/automated-Ukulele-in-cabinet-jukebox-/120700309666?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1c1a4c90a2

next is a Martin 5K for $16,500.00.

Ukulele Eddie
03-31-2014, 05:49 AM
My next ukulele will be the world's most expensive, according to my wife. It will cost some parts of my body I've grown rather fond of, over the years....


Ha! Almost spit my coffee out!:rotfl:

Ukulele Eddie
03-31-2014, 05:54 AM
In the mandolin world, top builder like Steve Gilchrist and Lynn Dudenbostel command $25K and up for a new instrument and sell everything they build. Are they worth it? Clearly they are, since there are a lot of people willing to pay it.

I just learned this myself yesterday, while chatting with a cycling buddy who is a mandolin player. I think he said there were three builders who routinely command $25k and up and the next level down has a handful of builders who get $10k-15k. I was really surprised. Makes me appreciate even more so (as if that's possible ;-) Chuck Moore, Jay Lichty and Beau Hannam. Let's hope they don't convert to mandolin building. ;-)

kwall
03-31-2014, 05:55 AM
this is the most expensive ukulele on ebay...
http://www.ebay.com/itm/automated-Ukulele-in-cabinet-jukebox-/120700309666?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1c1a4c90a2


that thing has been up forever, as well is that really considered a ukulele? fortunatly most ukulele's are reasonable, thats why i like it i can collect tonnes without breaking the bank like a guitarist would

Steveperrywriter
03-31-2014, 07:24 AM
A few years ago there was a Gibson Poinsettia uke that went on eBay in the same ballpark as that National mentioned above.

FWIW - the folks at the shop where I play have pointed out that ukes over $2000 or so almost *never* go to players, mainly to collectors to hang on their walls. And as anyone who has ever been into vintage "anything" knows, collectibles are only worth what someone will pay for them, leading to some pretty arbitrary values.

I suspect your shop guys need to get out more, Janeray -- anybody here who has instruments by Chuck Moore, Beau Hannam, Jay Lichty, or John Kinnard, just to name the first few that come to mind, [I]not[I] playing them? I kind of have the feeling that if any of these builders knew their uke was going to be locked away in a glass case and unplayed, they wouldn't make it for you …

Of course, I have been wrong before ...

RichM
03-31-2014, 07:30 AM
I suspect your shop guys need to get out more, Janeray -- anybody here who has instruments by Chuck Moore, Beau Hannam, Jay Lichty, or John Kinnard, just to name the first few that come to mind, [I]not[I] playing them? I kind of have the feeling that if any of these builders knew their uke was going to be locked away in a glass case and unplayed, they wouldn't make it for you …

Of course, I have been wrong before ...

I'm pretty sure you're right, Steve. $2000 isn't considered an expensive instrument anywhere else but in the ukulele world. Right here on UU we probably have at least 100 examples of people who own high-end instruments and play them like crazy.

Steveperrywriter
03-31-2014, 07:35 AM
There's a local classical guitar builder, Jeffrey Elliott, whose waiting list at one point stretched out to twelve years before he closed it.

Twelve years.

His used instruments go for fifteen to twenty grand, and as nearly as I can tell, they go to players and not collectors.

I suspect there are some stashed away, and there are uke collectors with rooms full of 'em they don't play, but I'd guess they were the exception rather than the rule. There was a thread recently in which a player who has two Chuck Moore ukes was talking about taking a beater to the beach, and Chuck chimed in: Hey, you got two, take one with you. Seems like the sign of a man who wants his creations played.

janeray1940
03-31-2014, 08:38 AM
I suspect your shop guys need to get out more, Janeray -- anybody here who has instruments by Chuck Moore, Beau Hannam, Jay Lichty, or John Kinnard, just to name the first few that come to mind, [I]not[I] playing them? I kind of have the feeling that if any of these builders knew their uke was going to be locked away in a glass case and unplayed, they wouldn't make it for you …

Of course, I have been wrong before ...

I should have been more specific - I was referring to the typical vintage "collector" ukes, e.g. Martin 5K, Gibson Poinsettia, etc. since the shop deals in a lot of vintage. Can't say I've ever ukes from any of the above builders come through; probably the two most expensive ones I've seen have been a 5K and a Taylor.

Although when I bought my Ohta-San a couple weeks back, one of the guys at the shop commented that he was glad that it was going to someone who would actually play it rather than lock it away in a case... and that wasn't even price-wise close to those you just named.

Freeda
03-31-2014, 08:39 AM
Gibson poinsettia.

stevepetergal
03-31-2014, 08:46 AM
what makes a ukulele worth ten grand?

The buyer.

Kamanaaloha
03-31-2014, 10:05 AM
Vintage Ukulele most certainly...I would argue that Eric DeVine could be mentioned in this elite breath...along with Scheurenbrand, and MooreBettah, Koolau, Collings, etc. For the newer makers, hand carved arch tops...definitely (Collings and Koolau)...intricate inlays, as well as rare inlay materials DeVine and MooreBettah and Scheurenbrand...as for rare materials...woods...the aforementioned most certainly cover most bases, but I am sure that I left some out...like Hive...Turner...Taylor...etc.

gold tuners/inlay? let alone turquoise...and lapis lazuli...and gems would make the price pop for sure...but I am not that into blinging an ukulele...except for the wood...

an arch topped hand carved kou ukulele would be really cool, imho...that has rarely figured and curly!

Stevelele
03-31-2014, 10:15 AM
I wish that we could get a Scheurenbrand review from someone on this board. I have heard reviews only from Shawn Y, which are great, but I would love to hear from someone else, too. If anyone has played one and wants to PM me with their thoughts, if you don't want to talk about it here, feel free.


Vintage Ukulele most certainly...I would argue that Eric DeVine could be mentioned in this elite breath...along with Scheurenbrand, and MooreBettah, Koolau, Collings, etc. For the newer makers, hand carved arch tops...definitely (Collings and Koolau)...intricate inlays, as well as rare inlay materials DeVine and MooreBettah and Scheurenbrand...as for rare materials...woods...the aforementioned most certainly cover most bases, but I am sure that I left some out...like Hive...Turner...Taylor...etc.

gold tuners/inlay? let alone turquoise...and lapis lazuli...and gems would make the price pop for sure...but I am not that into blinging an ukulele...except for the wood...

an arch topped hand carver kou ukulele would be really cool, imho...that was rarely figured and curly!

Tigeralum2001
03-31-2014, 10:53 AM
Hey, I'm willing to part with any of my ukes for a new world record of expense... I'll definitely help you hit that, if it is your goal! ;)

bborzell
03-31-2014, 12:34 PM
One Outdoor Uke, new Martin Strings, kept in non smoking house. Jealously guarded by a 15 lb. grey cat. $28,5000 firm.

Nickie
03-31-2014, 04:01 PM
I wonder what one of George Harrison's ukes wuold sell for?

janeray1940
03-31-2014, 04:16 PM
I wonder what one of George Harrison's ukes wuold sell for?

I do believe we have a winner here. Probably more than any of the builders mentioned above, or the "holy grail" ukes. Heck, if I had pockets that deep that's the one I'd spring for :)

dalamaricus
03-31-2014, 07:14 PM
A couple of years ago there was a $12,000 Kamaka: http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?59671-12-000-for-the-Humu-Custom-Kamaka!!!

Guess it ended up in Thailand: http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?61968-Unbelievable-Collection

ukulelekarcsi
04-01-2014, 03:48 AM
When it comes to prices, there's what sellers ask (sometimes outrageous) and what buyers pay. And to me, it's the latter that counts in this search for a record price. The problem is that paid prices are harder to research than demanded prices. There are Gibson Poinsettas with high demanded prices, that keep floating on ebay for years and never get sold.

No matter how good the quality of work of modern day luthiers is, or how expensive the materials they use, I think none of the new ukuleles exceeds $4200, neither new nor on the second hand market (where prices may be higher because of long waiting lists). I think a new Martin 5K or a Sontagg archtop top that list. Compared to other musical instruments, that price ceiling is rather modest.

So it down to the antiques market, where higher prices are fetched, and not just based on the musical, material or aesthetic qualities of the instrument itself, but also on historical ones: the price climbs when it's older, rarer or played by high profile people. Looking at auction sites, certified 19th century Hawaiian ukuleles can certainly exceed $5000. If ever one of the six 1907 Martin spruce-topped prototypes would be on offer, it would multiply that price.

But for all I know, the current record for a paid price on a ukulele, is on a National style 2 resonator (one of just 2 or 3 ever made) from 1931-1932 once owned by Bob Brozman, sold on ebay on March 3, 2014 for just five dollars short of $13.500.

ukulelekarcsi
04-01-2014, 04:14 AM
Oops, I just found more expensive ones, both auctioned for charities and owing their sale value to a connection with a famous owner.
- Eddie Vedder's Kamaka sold for $17.100 on June 12th, 2011. Not a very old or rare ukulele, but used by Vedder for his 'Ukulele songs' album, and auctioned off for a benefit.
- George Harrisons 1947, top-of-the-line, gold plated Dallas special model E banjo ukulele, is rare as hen's teeth and was sold at Bonhams in London in £21.600 on June 18th, 2008.

stevepetergal
04-01-2014, 06:49 AM
I read that Warren Buffett's Talsma was auctioned off for 10 grand.

65457

Ukulele Eddie
04-01-2014, 07:21 AM
No matter how good the quality of work of modern day luthiers is, or how expensive the materials they use, I think none of the new ukuleles exceeds $4200, neither new nor on the second hand market (where prices may be higher because of long waiting lists).

There are several luthiers -- well deserving -- that regularly sell ukes for more than $4,200 new: Moore Beetah, Devine, and Jay Lichty just to name a few.

WashAshore
04-01-2014, 08:14 AM
All of the above pieces are chump change in comparison to 45 million. Maybe in a few hundred years....

mm stan
04-01-2014, 10:19 AM
I'm not intrested in how expensive a uke is, it is how they sound, only rich erratic people buy them for 45 million...
Now Chuck Moore and Beau is the very top on my list and they are the very very best in my book IN UKULELES....even more than a 45 million whatevers..

Dan Uke
04-01-2014, 10:55 AM
I'm not intrested in how expensive a uke is, it is how they sound, only rich erratic people buy them for 45 million...
Now Chuck Moore and Beau is the very top on my list and they are the very very best in my book IN UKULELES....even more than a 45 million whatevers..

Agree in that an individual luthier should command top dollars as hourly wage is the highest expense per uke. I rather have one person dealing with the process than having a bunch of people building my uke. Chuck's prices seem very reasonable compared to let's say a Jake model from Kamaka. Jake's model is expensive because one of the Kamaka brother is making the uke himself vs. using all the other employees.

KnowsPickin
04-01-2014, 10:56 AM
I wonder if any rich ex-Laugh-In fan might have purchased Tiny Tim's ukulele at any point. It might have fetched some bucks. This does NOT mean that it was in any way an exceptional uke. Only that the right famous person owned it.

This could also happen if George Harrison's ukes are ever auctioned. He would have at least purchased nice, playable instruments.

mm stan
04-01-2014, 11:08 AM
Agree in that an individual luthier should command top dollars as hourly wage is the highest expense per uke. I rather have one person dealing with the process than having a bunch of people building my uke. Chuck's prices seem very reasonable compared to let's say a Jake model from Kamaka. Jake's model is expensive because one of the Kamaka brother is making the uke himself vs. using all the other employees.

ha ha danny we don't know if casey is doing all the work himself...hee hee

Kamanaaloha
04-01-2014, 11:51 AM
No matter how good the quality of work of modern day luthiers is, or how expensive the materials they use, I think none of the new ukuleles exceeds $4200, neither new nor on the second hand market (where prices may be higher because of long waiting lists). I think a new Martin 5K or a Sontagg archtop top that list. Compared to other musical instruments, that price ceiling is rather modest.



This is so not accurate, imho. If Eric DeVine would construct a Master grade Curly Koa necked instrument...with abalone inlays...ebony fret board/bridge/bindings/slothead/scrolled inlays...with blond curly koa inlay to offset the ebony binding...and pillow curly underwater maple sound board...or even mastergrade curly kou everywhere...the price could be double that...add gold leaf/inlay/tuners...and we are over the 10k mark for sure...remember the value of the instrument...like baseball cards is what someone is willing to pay for it...the greater the value for the underlying materials to make the instrument...assuming it sounds stellar...adds to the value...bare bones DeVines start out costing $4,000...once you start adding things...the price goes up...it requires a $2,000 deposit to get in line and the wait time is over 2 years...if you want it now...Puapua had DeVines typically for sale at around $10K...which is a bit high given that you could wait for an entry level/base model one for $4-6K depending on what you add to it...still not $4,200...just saying.

ukulelekarcsi
04-01-2014, 10:32 PM
There are several luthiers -- well deserving -- that regularly sell ukes for more than $4,200 new: Moore Beetah, Devine, and Jay Lichty just to name a few.

Thanks, I stand corrected! Chuck Moore lists a whole menu of options on his website, but even evn one chooses the whole she-bang, I only reach $ 4.350. Add custom inlay which can range upto $ 3.000 extra (but probably replaces all the purfling options) and special koa grades, and you're at $7.500. Eric DeVine states a maximum price of $ 4.200 for a baritone on his own website. Jay Lichty has a price calculator on his website that gives a max. of around $ 6.500. So I stand corrected on the price ceiling for new ukuleles. I did say that these instruments are so hard to get, that they fetch slightly higher prices on resale.

BTW, I didn't mention Warren Buffett's Dairy Queen ukulele because it 'only' fetched $ 11,211.11 on May 26, 2006. [There was a rumour in May 2010 of the seller wanting to auction it off again for $100.000, but no sign of anyone buying that - literally].

Still I stand by my conclusions:
- prices for top materials and top luthier expertise are still 50% below what old age + rarity + connection with someone famous + charity auctions do to those prices.
- the highest prices for new ukuleles are still well below what a custom made piano, accordeon or oboe costs. Or indeed, if you look at the DeVine and Lichty websites, below what their guitars cost.


Of course these top luthiers deserve top prices! I said that when antique ukuleles fetch even higher prices, it's not because they're better musical instruments or more beautiful, but for completely other reasons. I could add some explanation for that gap between top prices for new and old.

Let's take a look at the two top buyers:
- Harrison's Dallas E: the Beatles Museum in Liverpool
- Buffett's Talsma Dairy Queen: online casino GoldenPalace.com
Not really bought for playing music, eh? Both of them had a lot of press coverage through the auctions. Consider what I would have cost them for those precious minutes on news stations and newspapers, making people briefly aware of their existence, activities and logo.

Also, consider that the top three (Harrison, Buffett and Vedder ukuleles) were sold for charities, which implies a substantial tax cut. There's another indirect financial stimulus for higher prices.

The $ 12.000 Kamaka is one I really can't explain: it's way beyond the other prices, and sure it's 'rare', but if they'd want to, they could make another one tomorrow.

Thanks for the interesting, and contrasting opinions!

PS: Rereading my earlier message, I noticed the bit about 'outrageous prices demanded by sellers' can be the source of misunderstanding. I didn't refer to luthiers at all, the prices mentioned above are probably well deserved and not outrageous for people with a decent income. I did want it to refer to the ebay scams offering toy ukuleles for thousands of dollars, or auctions for old and broken ukuleles with starting bids at $20.000 that never receive a single bid. But it came out too vague, and therefore possibly insulting.

Kamanaaloha
04-02-2014, 12:37 PM
/agreed Thanks for the very thoughtful response! Would I spend > $2K for a ukulele? probably not...maybe a DeVine eventually...or even a custom arch top handcarved Koolau...it would be difficult for me to play...as i would be worried about it...and want to put it into a vacuum sealed vault...

:drool:

Freeda
04-02-2014, 01:59 PM
Thanks, I stand corrected! Chuck Moore lists a whole menu of options on his website, but even evn one chooses the whole she-bang, I only reach $ 4.350. Add custom inlay which can range upto $ 3.000 extra (but probably replaces all the purfling options) and special koa grades, and you're at $7.500. Eric DeVine states a maximum price of $ 4.200 for a baritone on his own website. Jay Lichty has a price calculator on his website that gives a max. of around $ 6.500. So I stand corrected on the price ceiling for new ukuleles. I did say that these instruments are so hard to get, that they fetch slightly higher prices on resale.

BTW, I didn't mention Warren Buffett's Dairy Queen ukulele because it 'only' fetched $ 11,211.11 on May 26, 2006. [There was a rumour in May 2010 of the seller wanting to auction it off again for $100.000, but no sign of anyone buying that - literally].

Still I stand by my conclusions:
- prices for top materials and top luthier expertise are still 50% below what old age + rarity + connection with someone famous + charity auctions do to those prices.
- the highest prices for new ukuleles are still well below what a custom made piano, accordeon or oboe costs. Or indeed, if you look at the DeVine and Lichty websites, below what their guitars cost.


Of course these top luthiers deserve top prices! I said that when antique ukuleles fetch even higher prices, it's not because they're better musical instruments or more beautiful, but for completely other reasons. I could add some explanation for that gap between top prices for new and old.

Let's take a look at the two top buyers:
- Harrison's Dallas E: the Beatles Museum in Liverpool
- Buffett's Talsma Dairy Queen: online casino GoldenPalace.com
Not really bought for playing music, eh? Both of them had a lot of press coverage through the auctions. Consider what I would have cost them for those precious minutes on news stations and newspapers, making people briefly aware of their existence, activities and logo.

Also, consider that the top three (Harrison, Buffett and Vedder ukuleles) were sold for charities, which implies a substantial tax cut. There's another indirect financial stimulus for higher prices.

The $ 12.000 Kamaka is one I really can't explain: it's way beyond the other prices, and sure it's 'rare', but if they'd want to, they could make another one tomorrow.

Thanks for the interesting, and contrasting opinions!

PS: Rereading my earlier message, I noticed the bit about 'outrageous prices demanded by sellers' can be the source of misunderstanding. I didn't refer to luthiers at all, the prices mentioned above are probably well deserved and not outrageous for people with a decent income. I did want it to refer to the ebay scams offering toy ukuleles for thousands of dollars, or auctions for old and broken ukuleles with starting bids at $20.000 that never receive a single bid. But it came out too vague, and therefore possibly insulting.

Fascinating! Thanks! I enjoyed this post.

Patrick Madsen
04-02-2014, 03:07 PM
For myself, my Moore Bettah "Two Feathers" is the most expensive in the world cause no matter the offer; it would never be enough.

AndrewKuker
04-02-2014, 08:56 PM
The $ 12.000 Kamaka is one I really can't explain: it's way beyond the other prices, and sure it's 'rare', but if they'd want to, they could make another one tomorrow.



I think itís a matter of whether or not you appreciate art.
Look at what paintings go for. I saw this gorgeous piece from Jackson Pollock that sold for like 150 million. Itís not stupid. You canít judge art or what it gives to people. Art is more real than money.
Our enitre monetary system is built on the fact that secret stock holders of the federal reserve pull currency out of their imaginary pockets and banks loan out 10 times what they have.

A timeless piece of art on an exquisitely built ukulele selling for 12 grand. You guys canít fathom that? Really?

This is the day of CNC and mass production but there are still true artists in this business and itís demeaning to say that they did not deserve good money for their amazing talent and the joy it brings someone that appreciates it and has worked hard to afford it.

WashAshore
04-03-2014, 02:03 AM
The world of art and high fashion is something I don't get. Another mystery to me is how the price of
something owned by a famous person is way out-of-bounds to it's actual value. Years ago my wife
and I purchased some items from the estate of a famous Hollywood star. The paperwork was lost in
a flood, now the value is less than a third of what we paid. Lesson-Elvis' dirty underwear is just dirty
underwear.

stevepetergal
04-04-2014, 09:43 AM
For myself, my Moore Bettah "Two Feathers" is the most expensive in the world cause no matter the offer; it would never be enough.

Some would say the same about thier Dolphins.

Skinny Money McGee
04-04-2014, 09:54 AM
For myself, my Moore Bettah "Two Feathers" is the most expensive in the world cause no matter the offer; it would never be enough.


Some would say the same about thier Dolphins.

Not sure I ever want to meet the owner of that Dolphin... lol

Kamanaaloha
04-04-2014, 10:19 AM
I think it’s a matter of whether or not you appreciate art.
Look at what paintings go for. I saw this gorgeous piece from Jackson Pollock that sold for like 150 million. It’s not stupid. You can’t judge art or what it gives to people. Art is more real than money.
Our enitre monetary system is built on the fact that secret stock holders of the federal reserve pull currency out of their imaginary pockets and banks loan out 10 times what they have.

A timeless piece of art on an exquisitely built ukulele selling for 12 grand. You guys can’t fathom that? Really?

This is the day of CNC and mass production but there are still true artists in this business and it’s demeaning to say that they did not deserve good money for their amazing talent and the joy it brings someone that appreciates it and has worked hard to afford it.

I am glad you weighed in...I agree here...hand carved ukulele...along with ukulele from rare woods and rare inlays...are awesome...I would have a difficult time playing something like an arch top...because I would be so worried about ruining it...and I would have to keep it uber new as a piece of art...you cannot play paintings/sculptures...but you can surely enjoy looking at them regularly! That being said...if I had one...or the scripts for one...I would buy it (DeVineMooreCollingsKoolau custom(s)) yesterday!

WashAshore
04-05-2014, 02:32 AM
I've been buying/selling/hoss trading guitars and antiques for 35+ years and know that
provenance plays a big role in the price. Although the market places a high value on it,
I don't. As I said before, when you come right down to it, Elvis' dirty underwear is just
dirty underwear. I would much rather own a custom piece of my design rather than a
tourist Uke owned by some "star".

Dan Uke
04-05-2014, 04:45 AM
The world of art and high fashion is something I don't get. Another mystery to me is how the price of
something owned by a famous person is way out-of-bounds to it's actual value. Years ago my wife
and I purchased some items from the estate of a famous Hollywood star. The paperwork was lost in
a flood, now the value is less than a third of what we paid. Lesson-Elvis' dirty underwear is just dirty
underwear.

yeah but a third of the price is still higher than if it only belonged to you

Dan Uke
04-05-2014, 04:48 AM
Some would say the same about thier Dolphins.

and some would say a Schoenhut is better than a dolphin. :D

WashAshore
04-05-2014, 05:32 AM
yeah but a third of the price is still higher than if it only belonged to you

No, the one-third reflects the actual value of the items regardless of ownership.

ukulelekarcsi
06-20-2014, 03:57 AM
Would it be a
Martin 5K?

Just to answer your initial question, there are modern and older Martin 5Ks. The recent paid prices for the new ones are somewhere around 4200-5300$, for older ones slightly higher, around 6000-8000$, depending on the factors discussed above (condition, provenance, rarity of the production year).

Staying with Martin, the 5Ms (or Daisy, as the very first testcase as well as the modern batch were called) are more rare, going somewhere between 5500$ for modern ones to 10.000$ for the older ones.

That's all a lot of money, but still nothing compared to that Stradivarius viola

iamesperambient
06-20-2014, 04:36 AM
I just read that a Stradivarius viola is expected to fetch forty five million dollars a Sotheby's auction!
That got me to thinking about what the world's most expensive Ukulele would sell for. Would it be a
Martin 5K?


the uke isn't a classical instrument or regarded as highly
like a violin or alike instrument so I doubt a uke will ever be
1 million unless owned by someone super famous. but to me
the price of a national reso or kamaka or high end Martin
is still a lot lf money for the avarage person.

coolkayaker1
06-20-2014, 05:50 AM
I read that Warren Buffett's Talsma was auctioned off for 10 grand.

65457

Since it has Warren Buffett's mojo on it, it's true value is at least twice that.

Word has it that he's an outstanding picker, but seldom does he wash his hands.

Kamanaaloha
06-23-2014, 11:03 AM
Hand carved arch top Koolau/Collings with super figured rare wood...then the vintage one of a kind things owned by someone famous(these are priceless)

The Big Kahuna
06-23-2014, 11:26 AM
It'd probably have to be made from the same tree that provided the wood for Iz's coffin, if there was any left...

That's just daft talk mate, there's loads left.

https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5247/5327327870_6610804e3c_z.jpg

The Big Kahuna
06-23-2014, 11:30 AM
Kanile'a used Hawaii beach sand for the inlays on their 50th state anniversary ukulele.

Iz was cremated, so his ashes are somewhere.

Martin like making tribute instruments.

#justsayin

Ukuleleblues
06-23-2014, 07:17 PM
You would think a Nunes uke would top the list, but most folks probably have no idea who he was. I always remember the book "the day after " where this fellow trades his Caddy for a bicycle tire. It all depends on your situation what things are worth to you.