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yl78
04-07-2014, 05:23 AM
I need advice pls:confused:
currently learning to play using a concert ukulele. it sounds ok when i play as a group. however when i practise solo i can hear mistakes made when strumming the chord. F chord sound strange maybe due to the fact that my middle finger positioning on the fret board wasnt correct. so right now I face another dreaded Chord E that i am having problems cramming the required fingers on the fretboard. i google and saw some posts commenting that they switch to bigger size ukulele to practise and than switch back to smaller ukulele with no problems.
thus am debating do i get a tenor which is one size up from the concert to practise solo at home or i stick to my concert and juz practise practise. but than i get no motivation to continue the practice after hitting chord f :eek::eek:

graybones
04-07-2014, 05:29 AM
I have a soprano and a concert and I actually find the soprano easier to play. Sometimes if I'm frustrated with a song I'll practice it on the soprano for awhile and then go back to the concert. I think it depends on the person... I have small hands so reaching across a larger fretboard for a Bb or something is harder than trying to fit several fingers in a smaller space, like for an Edim.

Probably the best thing is for you to go to a music store and try out some tenors and concerts back to back!

yl78
04-07-2014, 05:51 AM
I have a soprano and a concert and I actually find the soprano easier to play. Sometimes if I'm frustrated with a song I'll practice it on the soprano for awhile and then go back to the concert. I think it depends on the person... I have small hands so reaching across a larger fretboard for a Bb or something is harder than trying to fit several fingers in a smaller space, like for an Edim.

Probably the best thing is for you to go to a music store and try out some tenors and concerts back to back!

ok! will go down store n test out. i have fleshly fingers. tried to press down by at positioning finger at 90 degree. but after some time start to cramp~~~ thus post on the forum to see what other players with the same issue will do.

Louis0815
04-07-2014, 09:12 AM
Reading about cramping fingers immediately makes me raise another question: are you fretting too hard? Uke strings don't really need much pressure. Press just hard enough to make the strings ring clearly - no need to squeeze it into the fretboard.
Might be worth having a look at your uke and lower the action a bit - too high action can lead to fretted strings going slightly sharp (esp. when fretted too hard).

And finally the old rule: it's all a matter of practice, practice, practice.

Ukejenny
04-07-2014, 01:08 PM
I started on tenor because I thought it would be easier. I don't know if it was or not, but I eventually craved a smaller fretboard. So, I got a concert, and then a soprano. Love them all and enjoy playing them all, but I'm starting to feel like I'm a concert girl. I think learning on a different size might make some sense, depending on the size of your hands and the amount of time you've been playing.

Once you get comfortable with chords, and you will get comfortable with them, even the dreaded E, size won't matter as much as it does now. Or, at least that's how it has worked for me.

PhilUSAFRet
04-07-2014, 05:36 PM
I am a concert fan, but play sopranos and tenors as well. Proper technique is a skill that must be mastered, along with strumming, finger picking, fretting, etc. No short cuts, sorry. Those chords will become easier to play as you continue to practice. There are many tutorials on YouTube that can help. Just search: ukulele, how to_____________ and fill in the blank with hold, fret, strum, play an e chord, etc. etc. Lots of good advice above. I found the e Maj easier to fret when I rotated my hand slightly toward the headstock. It allowed me to place three fingers in more of a straight line on the fretboard. Good luck. Keep asking for help as you need it. Here's a great tutorial on that pesky E Major chord: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTJllbp4Y8E

bazmaz
04-08-2014, 01:32 AM
A common misconception is that an increase in size of uke makes it easier to play - the actual changes in fret spacings are actually not all that huge. What makes more of a difference on ease of playing is the width of the nut, and I own some sopranos with wider nuts than some tenors I have seen (and consequently, whilst they have fewer frets, they have more space to move around).

Put another way - my two most played sizes are soprano and tenor as I like the sound differences. I dont even own a concert any more as I find them neither one thing nor the other.

KnowsPickin
04-08-2014, 02:30 AM
There is a fellow in our uke group who started on a concert and took to it quite well. He'd tried to get his wife interested, but she did not find the instrument particularly comfortable to play. Then he got a tenor as a Christmas present to himself. Fortunately/unfortunately, his wife took to that one like a duck to water. Now he's thinking he'll have to buy another tenor if he ever wants to play one.

As I have fairly large fingers, I find the tenor gives me enough space that I'm not inadvertantly muting strings.

Good luck with your choice.

PhilUSAFRet
04-08-2014, 02:39 AM
"I dont even own a concert any more as I find them neither one thing nor the other." ...which is the point LOL. Kind of like the Fairy Tail of the Three Little Piggies, "This house (tenor) is too big, this house (soprano) is too small, this house (concert) is right." Lots of concert fans here feel they are just right.

yl78
04-08-2014, 03:44 AM
Reading about cramping fingers immediately makes me raise another question: are you fretting too hard? Uke strings don't really need much pressure. Press just hard enough to make the strings ring clearly - no need to squeeze it into the fretboard.
Might be worth having a look at your uke and lower the action a bit - too high action can lead to fretted strings going slightly sharp (esp. when fretted too hard).

And finally the old rule: it's all a matter of practice, practice, practice.

nope. not pressing down very hard. had to press down to avoid the thud sound not sure if i describe it correctly. the strings dun go sounding sharp only dull thud or something like that. thats why my tutor told me to press hard enuff on the string to avoid that. i know alot practise is needed as i am juz picking it up.

yl78
04-08-2014, 03:47 AM
There is a fellow in our uke group who started on a concert and took to it quite well. He'd tried to get his wife interested, but she did not find the instrument particularly comfortable to play. Then he got a tenor as a Christmas present to himself. Fortunately/unfortunately, his wife took to that one like a duck to water. Now he's thinking he'll have to buy another tenor if he ever wants to play one.

As I have fairly large fingers, I find the tenor gives me enough space that I'm not inadvertantly muting strings.

Good luck with your choice.


ho ho ho. thanks for the advice~~~:o

to the rest who have reply my posts thanks too!!! now all i have to do is go test a tenor and see if its easier for me to play or its abt the same than i shall juz stick to my concert.......

Uke-Conn
04-08-2014, 04:28 AM
"I dont even own a concert any more as I find them neither one thing nor the other." ...which is the point LOL. Kind of like the Fairy Tail of the Three Little Piggies, "This house (tenor) is too big, this house (soprano) is too small, this house (concert) is right." Lots of concert fans here feel they are just right.

When I got the itch to try ukulele, I settled on concert size as a good compromise between the portability of a soprano and the more full sound of a tenor. My first was/is a Cordoba 15CM, which I gather has maybe a higher volume and richer tone than most concerts. I think it has more volume than my KPK concert - they're kind of like two different animals in a number of ways.

I'm quite happy with my two concerts. I have the KPK strung re-entrant with Worth CM's, and the Cordoba with Aquilas and a Savarez low G. I'm finding it interesting to have both re-entrant and low G available. I'd like to try soprano and tenor sizes at some point, but for now I'm happy with what I have.

WestyShane
04-08-2014, 11:42 AM
How long have you been playing? It's certainly fun to try out new ukes but buying one in hopes that it improves your playing may prove dissapointing. I find some chords and chord changes easier to do on my concert but barre chords usually seem easier on my sopranos. What's more, sometimes one uke will feel easier to play and the very next day the opposite will happen.

Also, when you say you're having trouble with the F cord and are already trying to learn the E chord, that suggests that maybe you're trying to move ahead a bit too quickly. You have to walk before you run. I've been playing "seriously" for over a year and not so seriously for 4 or 5, and I still try to avoid the E cord if I can.

Louis0815
04-10-2014, 01:04 AM
nope. not pressing down very hard. had to press down to avoid the thud sound not sure if i describe it correctly. the strings dun go sounding sharp only dull thud or something like that. thats why my tutor told me to press hard enuff on the string to avoid that. i know alot practise is needed as i am juz picking it up.Thx for coming back on that one, apparently you're on the right track already.

Regarding the size question: My first uke was a soprano and it didn't feel comfortable, so I bought a concert which had just that extra tiny bit of space on the fretboard that I needed at that time. All over sudden I realized that the soprano fretboard was not that small at all.
Bottom line: sometimes the bigger scale helps getting a grip on the whole thing. And be warned, you might want to downsize sooner or later (I love my Kala travel soprano)

coolkayaker1
04-10-2014, 03:51 AM
I used to play a tenor because Jake plays one and it was macho and hip.

Now I play a concert despite Jake's niece playing one. Go figure.

Rllink
04-10-2014, 09:48 AM
I'm just a beginner. I'm playing a concert size uke and have been struggling with the E chord as well. However I'm determined to not only learn how to play it, but to own it. During this afternoon's practice I noticed that if I put my three fingers on the strings in the 4th fret first and get them positioned, then place my index finger where it belongs on the second fret of the A string, it goes much easier and ends up sounding much clearer. I don't know why that is, but I've been trying to train my fingers to go into that chord in that way all afternoon, and it has been getting smoother and smoother. You might try it and see what happens. It took me a while to re-learn that, as I had been trying to hit them all in unison which just wasn't working.

stringy
04-10-2014, 11:14 AM
IMHO your problem has nothing to do with the size. There just isn't that much difference between concert and tenor. Ukuleles are not all alike. A tenor in one brand will play easier than a concert in another brand and vice versa. If it was me I would try a different brand before I would try a different size.

Go to a local music store and play an Ukulele with good action. You will of course feel more comfortable with a particular size, but you see that they are both playable.

Nickie
04-10-2014, 02:44 PM
These are some pretty good answers....I play strictly concerts because I like the sound....not as chirpy as a soprano, and less guitar sounding than a tenor....the bari is a real challenge for me, I have short fingers. I was getting a lot of string buzzing and flat thuddy notes, and then somone showed me that I wasn't using enough pressure...

Louis0815
04-11-2014, 03:22 AM
The trick is too apply just enough pressure to have the notes ring clearly - and quite often this is way less than one might think. Thuddy notes are either a result of lacking pressure and/or wrong fretting position (fretting finger on top of the fret instead of just behind it; behind=closer to the headstock); only sometimes this is a desired effect called muting - and now you already know how to master that ;)

Zaki
04-11-2014, 04:20 AM
Found some really good advice here! I was an strictly soprano kind of girl until I had the chance to play a tenor IRL and realized they were not that bigger as I thought they were (and now I'm getting one, UAS here I come!)

So...if you have the chance to go try some tenors, I think that's the way to go!

In my case I chose a soprano 'cause I have short fingers and trying to play something "normal" like a guitar was a HUGE nightmare for me :) but I still haven't mastered the E chord yet :P so don't get discouraged if it isn't super easy for you at first :)

wlw4
04-13-2014, 03:36 PM
ok! will go down store n test out. i have fleshly fingers. tried to press down by at positioning finger at 90 degree. but after some time start to cramp~~~ thus post on the forum to see what other players with the same issue will do.

If you're having a hard time fretting the chord, it may also be that the action is too high at the nut. Most ukes come with the action set high because there's no buzzing, but that also makes it hard to make chords like F and A. You can search the internet for ways to lower the action yourself by filing down the slots in the nut. It's not neurosurgery, but you have to go slow or you'll end up with buzzing strings. Bu,t lowering the action at the nut will make the chords easier to get a clear note with less pressure required.

Wythe

pixiepurls
04-13-2014, 03:59 PM
my hand cramps more on my baritone then on my tenor... everyone has a different sized hand and muscles so it will certainly vary. I find it I play too long my hand cramps up also. So I STOP and play again later :) Listen to your body.

Newportlocal
04-13-2014, 04:57 PM
I started with sopranos. We still have a concert for my daughter. Now, all my ukes are tenor in low G except for an old gibson banjolele. One nice thing about tenors is that they are equally able to do linear or reentrant tuning well.
More than anything try to find a place or get together where you can try out the other sizes, and do what makes you happy!