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View Full Version : Why are there different chords for the same note?



cheesysalt
04-17-2014, 04:24 PM
And they sound different?
For example when I google "E", not E7 or Em or etc, just E, I get a couple different chords / where the fingers are placed, and they sound different. Im not sure if im wording this eloquently.

Camsuke
04-17-2014, 04:34 PM
Hi Cheesysalt, Aaron's videos should help. http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?92655-Chords-Up-The-Neck-Workshop-Posted-On-Youtube&highlight=chord+forms

Bill Mc
04-17-2014, 04:36 PM
You are getting different chord shapes for the E chord - E major is understood by E. The voicings, i.e., where the different notes appear in the chord shape do give a different color to the chord. But the different shapes consist of the same notes, E, G#, B. Is that helpful?

YorkSteve
04-18-2014, 05:14 AM
Imagine you are playing the chord on a piano. The three (or maybe 4) notes which make up the chord could be played in many different places on the piano, as each individual note appears lots of times in different places up and down the keyboard. Yes, each version of the same chord will sound different - some notes higher or lower - but they are made up of the same notes.

DownUpDave
04-18-2014, 05:36 AM
Cheesysalt

Thanks for asking that question. I am new and kinda figured I knew the answer...........but I really did not. I got one of those light bulb moments reading the answers above. If you had not asked the question I never would have been presented the information in such an impactful way. I still have that OMG look on my face

Thanks, got any more question that I might benefit from :confused:

Shastastan
04-19-2014, 12:30 PM
Hi Cheesysalt, Aaron's videos should help. http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?92655-Chords-Up-The-Neck-Workshop-Posted-On-Youtube&highlight=chord+forms

Thanks! This is a great answer to the op's question. Aaron is a good teacher! There's a lot of meat in that 10 min video, too.

ichadwick
04-27-2014, 02:14 AM
Get a chord dictionary that shows the various ways you can make a chord. When you play along with others, then you can create a richer sound by playing an alternative shape. For example, if they play C as 0003, you play it as 0787....

Ukejenny
04-28-2014, 03:50 AM
Cheesysalt

Thanks for asking that question. I am new and kinda figured I knew the answer...........but I really did not. I got one of those light bulb moments reading the answers above. If you had not asked the question I never would have been presented the information in such an impactful way. I still have that OMG look on my face

Thanks, got any more question that I might benefit from :confused:

Ukulele Underground is the best, isn't it?

sukie
04-28-2014, 04:05 AM
Ukulele Underground is the best, isn't it?

Yes. Yes, it is.

SoCal Ukester 713
04-28-2014, 06:27 AM
You are getting different chord shapes for the E chord - E major is understood by E. The voicings, i.e., where the different notes appear in the chord shape do give a different color to the chord. But the different shapes consist of the same notes, E, G#, B. Is that helpful?

Cheesy,
I'm a newbie on this board too, but I've been playing guitar and bass for 20 years. There are multiple places along the neck where the same chord (that is, the same combination of 3 or 4 notes) can be played. As you play farther up the neck, the notes will obviously sound higher. The chord's shape will change, but the chord's basic sound will be the same. Although, most of the time you'll just play the open chord version (usually the simplest fingering, with open strings). These playing choices are called phrasing.

If you're wondering about the actual chord notation... I think by "E" you mean an E major (the notes E, G sharp, and B played together). "E7" ("E seventh") adds a note to the chord, the seventh note of a major scale. It makes the chord sound jazzy. "Emin" ("E minor") lowers the G sharp by a half step, to G. It makes the chord sound sad.

Studying a little music theory would be really helpful. I started with a great workbook called "Practical Theory" by Sandy Feldstein.

Ramart
04-28-2014, 12:44 PM
... if they play C as 0003, you play it as 0787....

Exactly. Or try 5037.

ichadwick
04-29-2014, 01:06 AM
Exactly. Or try 5037.

Bit of a stretch on a tenor...

For beginners: a C chord requires C, E and G. This has 5 (C), 0 (C), 3 (G) and 7 (E) ...